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Home Selling in San Mateo County : Real Estate Advice

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  • Local Info4
  • Home Buying22
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Activity 60
Sun Apr 14, 2013
Michael Kaprielian answered:
Hello RCA888,

Improving the curb appeal will help yield better on your returns than a new roof. Do those thing to your home that help the buyers picture themselves in the property. Items like Landscape front and rear, fresh interior and/or exterior paint and upgrades to the kitchen and baths all increase both the value of the home and the interest from buyers. A good Realtor should not only be able to guide you on these matters but have the contacts to get the job done.

Picking a Realtor isn't hard at all, you just found one.

Hope to hear from you soon,
Michael

MKaprielian.com
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Thu Feb 14, 2013
Mack McCoy answered:
Thu Nov 22, 2012
Debra (Debbie) Rose answered:
If you have no savingss, not to be disrespectful, but why are you looking to move to a bigger home?

Maybe the best thing to do is stay where you are......keep current on your payments, keep you credit scores up............ and save some money.

You don't mention any financial hardship, or job transfer.............so..........this might not be the time for you to "move up".
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Tue Sep 4, 2012
Glen Mitchell answered:
which one makes more money? which one will cost more in repairs and or time? which one will you most likely get repeat visitors too? highway noise issues may be important, but there are probably bigger factors that you should be looking at in terms of purchase. For example if the property on the highway makes twice as much but costs the same, who cares about the noise :) ... more
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Fri Apr 29, 2016
David Tapper answered:
If I'm understanding your question regarding lead based paint, you don't have to do anything, jus don't eat the paint.

If this isn't your question, please rewrite it and I am happy to answer it for you.

Best.

Tap
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Tue Jul 24, 2012
Scott Godzyk answered:
NO, only licensed agents and brokers can list a home for sale on Trulia.
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Tue Feb 21, 2012
Sabrina Simpson answered:
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Tue Oct 18, 2011
Ron Thomas answered:
Please explain your question.
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Thu Aug 15, 2013
Doug & Bud Zeller answered:
Tue Sep 4, 2012
Ron Thomas answered:
Many people will tell you that you can dump it on the Bank and they will justify it by saying that the banks got us into this mess.....

The fact of the matter is that everyone helped and the Banks are not going to just sit there and accept everything like they had a target on their backs.

California is a Non-Recourse State: What this means is that the State has protected us by putting up a thin shield against Deficiency Judgements. I don't know if this has been tested in the Courts yet, but I would predict that we are going to hear a lot more about this in the future.

Right now, these are your choices:
1.) Keep the Townhouse, live in it and ride it out.
2.) Keep the Townhouse, rent it out, accept the negative cash flow for 1-3 years and ride it out.
3.) Do a shortsale; you will have to submit a letter to your lender telling them why you need to do the shortsale; just being Upside-Down is not enough; you need to demonstrate financial distress amd/or insolvancy. If you try to do this, and you have a vacation home, three apartment complexes, $250,000 in the bank and a job that pays $300,000 a year, you might have a tough sell.
4.) You can let it go to foreclosure; force their hand: This will take a year or more to accomplish, you will have to stop paying your mortgage and after three months, start calling them. You will ruin your credit and you are in for a year from h--l.
5.) Do a Voluntary Foreclosure, that is; give them a Deed-in-lieu, and you can walk away right now. This won't be as bad for you as the full foreclosure, but it will still affect your credit.
6.) If you do the SS or the Foreclosure, it will 2-3 years until you can buy something else, assuming that you can reconstruct your credit.

Please do not shoot the messinger.

Good luck and may God bless
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Fri Jul 1, 2011
Kerry Howard answered:
On the average homes in San Carlos priced between 800,000 and 900,000 from December of 2010 thru Jume of 2011 have been 30 days or less
0 votes 6 answers Share Flag
Thu Nov 14, 2013
Dan Gilmartin answered:
They have the right to pass, but hopefully by doing the work you can keep the deal together.

Dan Gilmartin
The Gilmartin Group
650-348-2020
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Fri Apr 22, 2011
Brad Davidson answered:
If your question is, can the seller make repairs to defects found in a home inspection and keep a buyer in the deal to buy the home? The answer is, no.. If a buyer wants out after the inspection, and you are still in the contingency period, they can cancel the contract.

Hope this helps.
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Mon Mar 28, 2011
Und asked:
0 votes 0 Answers Share Flag
Tue Mar 22, 2011
Moises Pelayo answered:
Good morning Jason. It truly depends on what part of San Bruno the property is located and the status of the detached living area. In the last 6 months there have been approximately a dozen or so homes and about 4 duplexes that fall within your parameters give or take some square footage. The single family homes ranaged from high to mid 400Ks to the low 600K. The duplexes rangede from the high 300K to the mid 500Ks. Keep in mind this is a braod blanket of San Bruno. One of the best approaches is to study the general area then focus on the local area trends in which the property is located.

If you are working with a realtor now, he/she should be able to give a pretty good idea of what the value is. If you are not working with someone and would like my assistance in any way, please give me a call at 650.333.0207
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Mon Feb 7, 2011
The Laugesen Team answered:
Dear Barry
It is best to sell your current home prior to buying a bigger home, you will be in a much better negotiating position once your property is sold. You can sell your house contingent upon you finding a home and typically you would give yourself 30 days to do, in the rare event you can't find a property to buy with in those 30 days you can either renegotiate the terms and ask for a longer period of time to find a home or rescind the contract. That usually never happens...
If you go in on an offer to purchase contingent upon the sale of your home, your offer might not be considered unless their is no competition on the new property that you want to purchase...So far this year I have been in multiple offer situations...I think we are coming out of the recession and people are finally ready to buy...
Good luck to you and if you have any other questions and you are not working with an agent already, feel free to call me.

Respectfully,
denise a laugesen
Top 1%
International President's Elite
Coldwell Banker
650-465-5742 (cell)
650-403-6225 (direct line)
email: denise.laugesen@cbnorcal.com
http://www.deniselaugesenteam.com
DRE 01011089
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Wed Mar 2, 2011
Anna M Brocco answered:
Commissions are always negotiable between you and your agent, there are no set standards as it would go against Federal Laws...therefore, consider interviewing in person a few agents, or as many as needed, from different realty companies, then choose the one you like best and who has the most to offer--choose your agent with care... ... more
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Fri Sep 5, 2014
Marcy Moyer answered:
Marinasea,
Commissions are always negotiable. You should speak to several realtors and see what they are willing to offer you. Most (including myself) will not discuss the details on a public forum and could vary depending on what you need and how realistic you are about the price of your home.

Marcy Moyer
DRE 01191194
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0 votes 11 answers Share Flag
Tue Mar 29, 2011
Mack McCoy answered:
Often. Not always, but often. Maybe even usually.

Think of it this way. How many days have you been on the market when you receive that first offer? Well, three weeks from now, it will be that plus twenty-one; will buyers think that it's become more valuable with extended market time? ... more
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