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Home Selling in Pittsburgh : Real Estate Advice

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  • Home Buying388
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Activity 59
Wed Apr 10, 2013
Michael Rayno answered:
Osvaldo: You should at the very least talk with several Real Estate professionals they can point out the plus's & minus's of trying to sell on your own. Good luck which ever way you decide to go. ... more
0 votes 5 answers Share Flag
Sun Mar 1, 2009
__________________ answered:
Where do you see that trulia is showing your home as a foreclosure? Please provide a link.

I just looked at your address and it does not say anything about it being a foreclosure.

Here's a copy of what I pulled from Trulia:
972 Old Leechburg Road, Pittsburgh PA 15239Map Sold for $74,900 on Jun 21st, 2001
3 br 2 ba 1,176 sqft Single-Family Home
This Single-Family Home located at 972 Old Leechburg Road, Pittsburgh PA 15239 is currently sold. 972 Old Leechburg Rd is in the 15239 ZIP code in Pittsburgh, PA. The average listing price for ZIP code 15239 is $178,950. 972 Old Leechburg Rd has 3 beds, 2 baths, approximately 1,176 square feet, and was built in 1925.
... more
0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Tue Mar 10, 2009
Jackie Hamilton answered:
Todd, we typically don't use a price per square foot except for new construction. If you tried to do a cost analysis using estimated sq. ft. your averages would be all over the place. We are one of those unique areas that don't advertise existing homes with square footage. What I could do for you is a Comparative Market Analysis on certain property specifics and give you average listing price and average sales price. You can email me if you want additional information. ... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Mon Feb 23, 2009
Terrence Charest answered:
In the state of PA, commissions are always negotiable. This may be a "norm" for the area or the office, but is cannot be a solid rule. $4K from $20K is 20%. No, don't fall for it.

I know I wouldn't do that. Check out other agents in the area.

Hope that helps,

Terrence Charest
... more
0 votes 24 answers Share Flag
Wed Feb 6, 2013
Terrence Charest answered:
That's a very broad question which would require further information in order to give an appropriate answer. You need to get in touch with a professional real estate agent or even an appraiser from your area. An agent can give you a market value for free while the appraiser will cost you.

A real estate agent can tell you what the market is actually doing in your area. Also, you need to realize that selling your exceptional home in an average neighborhood will take exceptional marketing skills to sell it. Interview several agents before picking one.

Hope that helps.
... more
0 votes 10 answers Share Flag
Fri Jan 24, 2014
Travis Broadwater answered:
Unfortunately some finance options will not be available if peeling paint is evident. I believe it varies by state but FHA, First time home buyer programs, VA, and other loan programs require a special appraisal that will reveal peeling paint among other things to the underwriter of the loan.

I have had many situations where peeling paint has been an issue, hopefully you can find someone who is going conventional or cash. Otherwise you might want to consider a good paint job. Im sure for the cost your curb appeal will be improved significantly!
... more
0 votes 13 answers Share Flag
Thu Dec 4, 2008
Christopher Thomas answered:
Kari,

Please send me a list of the property addresses and asking prices. I will review them with potential customers.

Thanks.

Chris
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Thu Oct 2, 2008
The Florida Property Experts answered:
That all depends on what your listing contract says. If the buyer wants to offer an additional 6% and have you pay it back to them in the form of closing costs, that raises the sales price of the home. If your listing contract says that your agent gets paid a percentage of the sales price, then yes, you do pay a percentage of that to the agent because the sales price went up.

You could always ask the buyer to raise their purchase price by 6% plus the difference in the agents commission and then you would break even...I would think that would be fair considering the buyer doesn't want/isn't able to come up with closing costs and their situation really shouldn't cost you more money.

Everything is negotiable - but if you've already got a written agreement with your broker to pay them based on the gross sales price of the home, then they may very well expect you to abide by that agreement.

If I can be of any further assistance, please don't hesitate to contact me at http://www.HernandoLuxuryHomes.com - I'm happy to help!

Thanks,

-Josh
... more
0 votes 7 answers Share Flag
Tue Apr 11, 2017
Erin J. Marton answered:
Hello Dar!
It really is a question of whether or not you are ready to move on and take a loss. I would certainly say that if there are issues, some of the major ones would need to be repaired before you put your house on the market. Which ones it would be would be difficult to say without me having more information. Anything that is purely cosmetic could be left as is, but if there are major structural problems I would recommend looking into repair. You could also list your house as-is with an agent, but I would not recommend it as the market is pretty competitive and you could easily get passed on by buyers who are not willing to make any major repairs.
Have you had a home inspection? It may be a good investment in your case as it would give you a good picture of what your home is in need of and how much it could cost to fix.
Let me know if I can be of any assistance!
Erin
... more
0 votes 14 answers Share Flag
Sun Jul 6, 2008
Alina Kanevsky answered:
Kristin,
I work for a bank in the lending department and i do have to tell you that your husband is right because you must try to do naything possible to avoid a foreclosure. There are a few options that you might want to take a look at if you house is not able to be sold such as working with a company that specializes in foreclosure buy outs, short sales, ect....however that all depends on where your husbank stand on the mortgage at a current time. If money is a problem there are ways to get financing to be able to get through this rough real state market we are in where people are having such a hard time selling their homes. However to really be advise you property i'd have to have a much better understanding that you are in.
Feel free to contact me any time.
Thank you,

Alina Kanevsky
Lending Specialist

Mid Atlantic Capital
405 Kings Highway South
Cherry Hill, NJ, 08034
Phone: 856-429-2207
Toll Free: 800-232-5171 ext. 501
Fax: 856-429-4118
Cell: 267-474-8050

Email: akanevsky@midacap.com
Web Address: www.midacap.com
... more
0 votes 11 answers Share Flag
Mon Jun 2, 2008
Crystal Alfonsi answered:
As long as it is your primary residence and your net proceeds are less than $250,000/individual or $500,000/couple - you do not have to worry about capital gains taxes at all. If you are close to either of those numbers, make sure you speak with your accountant first! ... more
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Sun Mar 30, 2008
James Hsu answered:
I think that is a very diplomatic way solution to your problem. First, see if you can get an objective opinion of your roof from a roofing contractor. Maybe ask if the roofing contractor could or would give it a 5-year certification...meaning..in his opinion, he thinks that it's in good enough condition that it would last 5 more years. This certification is by no means a guarantee (make sure you and the buyer aren't confused about that point). What this does is provide you...as the seller...a bit more justification for your proposal.

Even if you can't get a 5-year cert, I still don't think its unreasonable in your counter of the buyer's request to say what you said here. There have been no issues with the roof past or present, but you recognize the buyer's situation. Rather than just flat out say no, you would be willing to contribute half to the cost of a replacment ...(oh here's another reason to get a roofing contractor out there to look...you can get an estimate of how much half really will be).

If you're armed with facts and are willing to work things out (as it sounds like you are), then it's not unreasonable to do what you are proposing.

Whether or not it's practical is a whole different subject. I'm not familiar with your area's market condition, but if there are plenty of houses like yours without the roof issues, ..the buyer could simply walk and find something else.

Keep in mind, it's not just what you're offering that matters, it's your delivery.

Good luck.
It's like saying ..Hey..I realize your inspector says the roof is old and should be replaced, .. I've got a roofer that says this
... more
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Wed Dec 8, 2010
Crystal Alfonsi answered:
Not at all...they have no obligation to you until you both sign a contract. That's why it is always best to have your agent present your offer in person or at least make sure that you and your agent are in constant contact and you are ready with answers immediately so that you can quickly come to terms. The worst thing for a deal is too much down time. ... more
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Tue Dec 30, 2008
YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD REALTOR answered:
You can always put to much into a property whether it be a townhouse or even a house. There is always a limit when you can over remodel the place but the kitchens and baths are the biggest reason why the properties sell and with the remodeling it will sell that much quicker than everything else out there as long as you have it priced right. So remember to keep the costs to a minimum and son't go overboard. ... more
0 votes 5 answers Share Flag
Tue May 25, 2010
Deborah Madey answered:
If the fees are part of the listing contract, yes. This is similar to UPS charging a fuel surcharge on every shipment, and the car rental companies who charge extra fees for airport locations, or attorneys who charge you for postage, or the service station that charges you for disposing of oil, or the vet office who charges for waste disposal, or the bank who charges you for a copy of checks or ATM charge, or the phone company who charges for an unlisted phone number.......etc, etc.,

The list is endless, and it is, unfortunately, a part of all walks of life and business.

I expect to see more more and more add on fees in real estate in the next few years.

Your term of doc preparation fees and the fee you are quoting leads me to believe that you might be using some Coldwell Banker affiliated companies and those fees might be for those services, and not real estate brokerage services.

Add on fees that I see for real estate brokerage are generally not that high.

Mortgage companies generally have a lot of add on fees.

Your brokerage fee may or may not have add on fees. Check your listing agreement.
... more
0 votes 10 answers Share Flag
Fri Oct 24, 2008
Carol Andres Baer, Realtor® answered:
Dan,
Your question covers a broad area. What price range? How many number of bedrooms? There are many factors to consider, especially with the current state of the mortgage industry. I can give you a very generic answer if you can give me a few more details. However, having an agent visit your home to create a personalized comparative market analysis will provide you with the most accurate information. ... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Tue Jun 26, 2012
Carrie Crowell answered:
Just like with any property if the city, government needs the property to grow or build, they will buy it. In what capacity do you mean?
0 votes 9 answers Share Flag
Fri Aug 10, 2007
Kendra Garcia ~ Realtor, CBR answered:
Mr. C Franklin, I do not have access to that information since I'm not in PA but you can find that information on your local courthouse or city hall. You can also contact a local real estate agent as they can assist you.

Here are a few links that can help you:
http://www.washingtonpa.us/
http://www.washwow.com/
... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Tue May 5, 2015
Herman Chang answered:
Normally no grace period. Unless agent had shown property to a buyer and this same buyer decides to buy after the listing period (time frame should be specified in contract). Review contract for clauses regarding expiration and commission. ... more
0 votes 14 answers Share Flag
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