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Fremont : Real Estate Advice

  • All827
  • Local Info66
  • Home Buying482
  • Home Selling42
  • Market Conditions30

Activity 827
Mon Feb 4, 2013
Walter 'Skip' Kersten answered:
The main problem is going to be costs. It will cost you approximately 6-8% to sell your home. Although there has been some price appreciation the last 6 months, it may not be enough to cover your costs.
Good luck,
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0 votes 15 answers Share Flag
Sat Aug 17, 2013
Claudia Muller answered:
It should not take longer than 2-3 weeks maximum.
0 votes 5 answers Share Flag
Tue Jan 8, 2013
Tina Lam answered:
Yes, it's worth that much or more. The offer price depends on your offer package.

1. Is there any train noise?

>> This depends on how sensitive you are to any train noise.

2. Are schools good in this area?

>> Yes they are.

3. What interest rate should we expect for 10% down.

>> This depends on the loan terms and your credit scores. It can be anywhere from 2.5% to 6%.

Have you worked with a Realtor?
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0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Tue Jan 8, 2013
Steven Ornellas answered:
goel.puneet88:

You should mentally prepare for the possibility the Seller's passing may become a higher priority to the Seller's family than closing escrow in two weeks.

The best thing you can do is remain patient and look to your Agent for providing status from the Seller's Agent who should contact the Negotiator making them aware of this extenuating circumstance.

-Steve
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0 votes 9 answers Share Flag
Tue Jan 8, 2013
Dean Paul Dominguez answered:
My sympathies to you and your seller. This is a very complex legal question. Not to be morbid but I wonder what is the nature of the incapacitation and also wondering if the seller signed a Do Not Resuscitate Form. If this was signed, maybe an estate attorney can do something for you. Of course what I say above is pure speculation and I'm just throwing ideas out there. Good luck. ... more
0 votes 6 answers Share Flag
Sun Jan 6, 2013
Brian Ripp answered:
Trains do use this track on a regular basis.
They only blow their horn at Alvarado Blvd.

It is not hard to sell a home in this area due to the homes are newer and well-built homes, good elem. school and an overall nice area.

The only other noise you might hear is from Southwest or Fed-X as this is the flight path to Oakland Airport.

good luck,
Brian
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0 votes 6 answers Share Flag
Fri Dec 28, 2012
Steven Ornellas answered:
Hi Randy,

These sites may be of help in finding a rental:

http://www.rentometer.com
http://www.rentalhomesplus.com
http://hotpads.com
http://geo.craigslist.org/iso/us/ca
http://www.myapartmentmap.com/

-Steve
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0 votes 7 answers Share Flag
Wed Dec 26, 2012
Riffat Husain answered:
Hi, Randy.
Typically it means that it is a stand alone house for a single family. It is not a condo or a town home or a duet, or any other kind of residence.
0 votes 7 answers Share Flag
Sun Dec 23, 2012
Brian Ripp answered:
yes you can. There are several options, as low as 3.5%.
If you need a list of loan officers, I can refer you a few.

Brian
0 votes 16 answers Share Flag
Wed Feb 26, 2014
Tina Lam answered:
If you're still in your inspection contingency period, you can back out of the contract for anything you don't like about the property. California laws are very favorable in protecting buyers.

However, I'm not sure this issue should be a reason for you to back out. For each property, there's a legal and physical description. Sometimes they're the same and often they're not. That's why the legal description is the one listed on the title.

You can live in a community where all the homes are detached and look like any other single family residence. (Similarly, you can find townhomes and apartment-style units all classified as condos.) But the community itself may have common areas which are jointly owned by all the owners. So, depending on how the prelim reads, you may own the land under your home and co-own the common areas. Or, if you're referring to the Robson community in Warm Springs, you co-own all the land.

Either way, if you find the home offers what you want at the right price, then you should consider completing the sale. Have you discussed this with your Realtor?
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0 votes 12 answers Share Flag
Mon Dec 17, 2012
Steven Ornellas answered:
Hi Sudha,

Check out "MyNewPlace Pet Friendly Apartments for Rent"
http://tinyurl.com/c3chquv

-Steve
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Sun Feb 17, 2013
Dean Paul Dominguez answered:
Your question is vague. Are you asking: What is the easiest way to travel to SFO *and* to Cupertino? If so, what is your starting point and what mode of transportation do you prefer?

Or are you asking what is the easiest way to travel *from* sfo downtown to Cupertino?
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0 votes 5 answers Share Flag
Tue Nov 19, 2013
Ken Vasan answered:
The offer that you present itself is an AS IS offer. Meaning, what you see is what you get. However, this does not include major issues that are unearthed during inspection process and you have every right to renegotiate on the price or back out if you have not removed the contingencies. When some listing agent explicitly puts "Buyer to take property AS IS" means they are trying to emphasize that seller will not fix any small issues. ... more
0 votes 13 answers Share Flag
Fri Dec 21, 2012
Pacita Dimacali answered:
Busy

How "slow" is his response time? More than an hour? More than 24 hours?

If he doesn't respond right away, like within an hour of your call or text, he may be engaged in other activities, not necessarily working with other clients. We do have classes, sales meetings and conferences to attend as part of our continuing education.

I'm wondering if your realtor is also thinking the same thing -- are you taking HIM seriously? Do you listen to his advice? Are you focused on your search? Or are you looking for all kinds of properties in several cities?

The best thing both of you can do for each other is to focus on the type of property and budget range for your search. If you aren't clear on what and where you want and what your budget range is, it's like looking for a needle in a haystack.

Make one more attempt and set expectations. If you are still unhappy or dissatisfied with your realtor, and since you apparently didn't sign a buyer broker agreement, you'll see that there is a number of realtors who may want to give it a shot.

Good luck.
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0 votes 13 answers Share Flag
Sat Nov 24, 2012
Joe Patel answered:
You may check with Vikki.she is working with property management company.below is her contact. I hope this helps.

Vikki L Vincenzi
Regional Manager, CCRM
Bay Property Group
39465 Paseo Padre Parkway # 1500
Fremont, CA 94538
OFFICE: 510-505-5545
MOBILE: 510-459-2010
vikki@baypropertygroup.com
http://baypropertygroup.com

Lic#: 01461386
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0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Wed Nov 28, 2012
Cindy Davis answered:
Closing costs have to be paid one way or another. You can't expect lenders, title companies and escrow companies to work for free....!

Closing costs average between 2.5 - 3% of your purchase price. About half of that are lender fees (borrowing is expensive)...then you have escrow fees, title fees for you loan, appraisal fees, doc fees, etc etc.

You particular lender may be able to wrap some of these fees into your loan...but one way or another, they need to be paid.

Best of luck.
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0 votes 9 answers Share Flag
Tue Mar 28, 2017
Steven Ornellas answered:
Hi Vishal,

Here are a number of links that should help you very much:

"Retail Banks vs. Mortgage Broker/Bankers"
http://tinyurl.com/6qln6nd
Personally, I only work with Mortgage Broker/Bankers.

“Pre-Qualified vs. Pre-Approved vs. True Pre-Approval”
http://www.Steven-Anthony.com/GettingStarted

http://docs.Steven-Anthony.com/SAR-HowMortgageRatesAreDetermined.pdf
http://docs.Steven-Anthony.com/RateShopping-DoItRight.pdf

Best Regards, Steve
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0 votes 13 answers Share Flag
Sun Mar 12, 2017
AMIT GAMBHIR answered:
Yes the interest rate will change when you will refinance and show it as a rental property. The taxes will not have a change in it because taxes is based on the location not whether its a primary residence or rental property. No implication just make sure when you are buying the property as owner occupy use it as a owner occupy and if you buy it as a investment use it as an investment. ... more
0 votes 11 answers Share Flag
Thu Mar 13, 2014
Daphne Sun Lau answered:
Like any neighborhood, there are parts that are safer than others. Court locations away from the main avenues like Decoto & Fremont Blvd., and away from places -- 7/11's -- that tend to attract less than desirable elements would be best.

Last summer, we sold a home on a court location in Brookvale. It was a lovely house with neighbors who know each other and watch out for each others. That house sold on the first weekend!

So, it depends. If you should care to message me with the address, would welcome the opportunity to take a closer look.


Daphne
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0 votes 8 answers Share Flag
Wed Nov 14, 2012
Ron Thomas answered:
LISTING PRICE
Understand that the LISTING PRICE has one primary objective, to attract attention: It is not intended to be set in stone, and in many cases it is not even a good guideline toward the SELLING PRICE.
Some Sellers believe that by setting the LISTING PRICE high, they can always come down, and people will make an offer anyway: WRONG! Buyers will just bypass the property and look at houses that are within their price range. And six months from now, the Seller will slowly start lowering the PRICE, (this is called “chasing the curve”) and Buyers will be asking the question; “What’s wrong with that house?” and “Why has it been on the Market so long?”
Other Sellers set the LISTING PRICE low, to attract multiple offers. (The correct strategy.) We are asked; “Aren’t you obligated to sell at this price if someone offers it?” The answer is probably not; for that to happen, you would first have to have only one offer, and secondly, the offer would have be exactly the same, down to the smallest detail, (please discuss this with your Realtor).
Another thought; Buyer will search for potential properties by groups; for example, $400,000 to $450,000, and $250,000 to $300,000. If your house is priced at $460,000 or $310,000, the Buyers will never see it. (something else to discuss with your Agent.)
Different Banks have different philosophies about pricing their properties: You cannot draw any conclusions without a good analysis.
Have your Realtor do a CMA, (Comparative Market Analysis) to help you determine your Offering Price. It is the surest way to determine the Market Value of the property.
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0 votes 10 answers Share Flag
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