Trulia Community - Advice from neighbors and local experts

Find Your Community
We couldn't find that location. Please try again.
Get Expert Advice

Rental Basics in 33309 : Real Estate Advice

  • All48
  • Local Info5
  • Home Buying13
  • Home Selling7
  • Market Conditions0

Activity 16
Fri Apr 26, 2013
Keith Jean-Pierre answered:
Normal wear and tear is the liability of the landlord, but anything outside of "normal" is tenant responsibility. As for what is "normal", that is open to interpretation, but common sense should be used here. ... more
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Mon Apr 15, 2013
John Bourassa answered:
Inspections are very important upon purchasing a property and I highly recommend that every prospective buyer has an inspection done on their selective property. Although many properties are sold "AS-IS" With A Right To Inspect, meaning that a seller is selling his/her property "AS-IS" in the condition it is in and declares that he/she has priced the property accordingly and will not make any repairs to satisfy a buyer's purchase. However, at least, in the State of Florida (check with your state laws), buyers have a right to inspect any properties whether a property is sold "AS-IS", or not, and buyers may walk away from of a contract if they do not like the results or their inspections (extensive work needed and cost for repairs). .

The time limit for inspections vary from contract to contract. Most contracts have a standard general provision (clause) addressing inspections plus they have addendum and riders for specific inspections (Lead Based Paint, Mold, Chinese Dry-Wall, etc.). Standard contract clauses for general inspections usually have 10 or 15 days default periods for inspections but they also have a blank line to manually add another time period if needed (shorter or longer). Make sure that your inspection periods are consistent with each other: i.e. In addition to the general inspection, if a buyer decides to have a mold inspection, mold inspections are timely because they need to be sent out to labs and after results, it could be necessary to conduct more tests and what not. So, you may want to allow more time for this inspection. Otherwise, If buyers let it be within the same time-frame as the general inspection, they may lose their edge to walk away from their contract on technicality of time and be forced to go through with the sale.

I highly recommend to any buyers to do their homework before they are ready to purchase properties. Call professional inspectors, ask questions about what is involved with specific inspections along with potential costs and time involved. This way buyers will have a better idea of time; then, when ready to write a contract, discuss proper time-frame with your Realtor-Agent.

Even if buyers are looking for fixer-uppers and think "What's the use of an inspection. I'm gonna renovate the house entirely." Inspections are money well spent -- especially on a house -- to make sure the house has good bones, good foundation, condition of plumbing and electrical wiring, a solid roof and that its wood is not decayed by dry-rot or other wood damage (termites, for instance). This way buyers know the whole condition of the property. Sometimes, fixer-uppers can be a money-pit.

DISCLOSURE: I AM NOT AN ATTORNEY NOR A PROFESSIONAL INSPECTOR -- DO NOT TAKE MY STATEMENT FOR GRANTED -- ALWAYS CHECK WITH YOUR REALTOR-AGENT, OR A LICENSED PROFESSIONAL PROPERTY INSPECTOR, OR WITH AN ATTORNEY OR WITH ANY OTHER RELATED PROFESSIONALS CONCERNING ANY INSPECTION CLAUSES OR RIDERS TO UNDERSTAND CLEARLY WHAT IS INVOLVED AND TO ENSURE THAT YOU CAN AND WILL GET YOUR MONEY BACK IF YOU WANT OUT OF A CONTRACT AS RESULT OF NEGATIVE INSPECTIONS.
... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Tue Apr 9, 2013
Nicole Nicholson answered:
Mon Feb 4, 2013
Meir Aloni answered:
You hire a pro to help if you are not familiar with the process.

I don't think that this is the place to talk law or that the Realtors here are to give legal advice:(

In Broward county (on residential properties) the owner pays property taxes

With enthusiasm,

Meir Aloni & Team

CRS (Certified Residential Specialist)

CDPE (Certified Distressed Property Expert)

RECS (Real Estate Cyberspace Society)

Successfully selling Broward County since 1986!

Direct phone# 954-338-5220 http://www.WeSellBroward.com

All Star Realty Inc.
... more
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Mon Feb 4, 2013
Stephen McRory answered:
Sat Feb 9, 2013
Nadine Mauro answered:
Hi,

With so many scams going around, you want to work with an agent you trust.

DO NOT wire money to a anyone claiming to own a property, if you have not previously actually met the person. Many scams ask for the first 3 months be sent by money order to a P.O. BOX in another country.

Ask your agent to see if there are any foreclosure proceedings against the person whose property you plan to rent. You can then periodically check on any actions against the owner by check the county clerks website for your county.

Renter (buyer) beware.

Nadine Mauro
Highlight Realty
561-414-0864
NadineSellsHouses@gmail.com
... more
0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Mon Feb 4, 2013
Danielle Sharp answered:
Sounds like you broke a lease. Read the contract, review any documentation the property manager may have signed as an agreement with you.
0 votes 7 answers Share Flag
Mon Feb 4, 2013
Michael McGovern answered:
Property Taxes are the obligation of the homeowner.
0 votes 10 answers Share Flag
Mon Mar 12, 2012
Maria Jessica DeLuna answered:
Hi,
1. Before you sign a lease, make sure that you are aware of everything that is included in the rent, if any.
2. I strongly recommend that you research the financial status of the landlord. Is there foreclosure proceeding going on? This is public information that you can research or your realtor can help you find out. You don't want to move in to a place and later find out that it is being foreclosed.
3. If there is anything in the lease agreement that you don't understand, ask your realtor for explanation or ask for legal advice.

I hope this helps.

Maria Jessica DeLuna
Keller Williams Realty
Direct: 954-882-1517
Email: mariajessica.deluna@gmail.com
... more
0 votes 6 answers Share Flag
Sat Jul 23, 2011
Ginger Allen answered:
Mid August. Most associations require 30 day approval process. Please let me know if I can be of assistance. Have a great day! Ginger
0 votes 6 answers Share Flag
Fri Jun 4, 2010
Debra (Debbie) Rose answered:
I don't think it matters what state you are in as far as a lease goes in that it is an agreement between 2 parties - the time frame can be 3, 6 months, 12, 24 months or longer - it is whatever is agreed to between the landlord and tenant - nothing says a lease has to be for 1 year (12 months) to be "legal".......with or without a realtor..

Of course, I must say I am not an attorney, so this isn't legal advice!
... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Tue Sep 22, 2009
John Elwell answered:
You need to approach these with GREAT care, especially if you are going to do it without an agent. I definitely recommend that you have an attorney draw up the papers so you can be sure that everything is clear and your interests are protected. Just suppose that you do this deal and are paying for two years, and all of a sudden the sheriff appears on the door steps telling you the owners have not been paying their mortgage payments and the home is being foreclosed on? Where is the money you paid? Your deposits? Do not rely on what the seller/owner is saying. It could be true, it could be a lie, or just incorrect. Get some legal advice before you go down this road. ... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Mon Feb 4, 2013
Angela Schrager answered:
Hi Donna: If you are looking for a long term rental, it really doesn't make that much difference. If you're looking at short term or vacation rentals, then May through October are the cheapest months, coinciding with the low tourist season in South Florida.

Hope that helps a little.

Best regards,

Angela
Villa G Realty, Inc.
Tel: 954-816-7996
... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Tue Jul 21, 2009
Fred Griffin answered:
See a Real Estate Attorney for Legal Advice.

You need copies of any leases, security deposits, etc.


If the Tenant has a Lease, your property will [most likely] be subject to the Lease. The Renter(s) will be able to remain in the property as long as they pay the rent and honor the terms of the lease.

If there is a Deposit, you want that money from the Seller.

-----------------------------------
If this were a Foreclosure, a Tenant in Florida has no rights, you could put them out when you bought the property at the Foreclosure Auction. You would get a Writ of Possession from the Clerk of the Court, take said Writ to the local Sheriff, who would then evict the Tenant.

But with a Short Sale that does not happen. The Lease Rules.
_______________________

BTW,
as with any Short Sale:

Make sure you get Clear Title.

- Has your Title Agent or Attorney contacted the Homeowners' Association to determine what if any amount of Homeowners' Association Fees are past Due?

- Has your Agent or Attorney reviewed the Covenants and Restrictions for the HOA?

- Has your Agent or Attorney talked with an Officer of Director of the HOA?


- Has your Title Agent or Attorney talked with the Tax Collector to determine what if any Taxes are delinquent?


Again, see a Real Estate Attorney


----------------------------
Best wishes,
Fred
---------------------------
... more
0 votes 8 answers Share Flag
Sat Jun 6, 2009
Nadine Mauro answered:
Hi Scott,

Please check out my website below. You can search for rentals, and the information is constantly updated.

Nadine Mauro
Regency Realty Services
561-414-0864
NadineMauroRE@yahoo.com

Search the MLS like an agent:
www.FloridaHouseSeller.ListingBook.com
... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Mon Apr 6, 2009
Bill Eckler answered:
Jay,

Lease questions are best referred to an attorney....

Our recommendation is to contact a Florida licensed attorney for reliable information. We would be happy to provide you with contact information. ... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Search Advice
Search

Followers

597