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Rental Basics in 20260 : Real Estate Advice

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Activity 10
Tue Aug 14, 2012
Andrea Tucker answered:
Hi Swinton. Are you only looking for a voucher rental or would you take a cash rental as well? Also are you renting this on your own? Please contact me if you are in need of assistance.




Andrea Tucker
Exit Elite Realty
(202) 642-8117
(301) 277-3948
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Mon May 21, 2012
Zaza Pasori answered:
Hi,
Your landlord - and his agents - may enter your unit with reasonable notice for repair and maintenance, inspections, and to show the unit to prospective tenants. Please see your lease for details.

Zaza Pasori | Realty Resource, LLC
2722 Connecticut Avenue NW
72, Washington, DC 20008
Cell:202-412-5221 Office:703-437-5580

Equal Housing Opportunity

Principal Broker: Realty Resource, LLC 715 Tonquin Pl, Leesburg, VA 20176
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Sat Feb 9, 2013
Juliet Zucker answered:
Are you looking for an agent to find a tenant or are you looking for a property manager to both find a tenant and manage your property? You can find either by searching a good real estate company, like Long and Foster (www.longandfoster.com) and searching for agents who handle rentals. Good luck! ... more
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Mon May 21, 2012
Zaza Pasori answered:
I would have a walk through before I sign the lease If I were you,and make a list of the pre-existing conditions to avoid future liabilities.
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Mon May 21, 2012
Scott Godzyk answered:
It depends if you have signed anything ir received anything in writing that you were approved. If nothingwas in writing you should be able to get it back. shame on them for not having you sign anything. If you gave teh deposit as part of a rental agreement, then see if it states of the deposit is refundable ... more
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Mon Apr 11, 2011
Jim McCowan answered:
You have to register with the city and get a business license. You can be fined if you're caught renting without it. It's quite the hassle!
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Wed Jul 28, 2010
Don Tepper answered:
I'm not a lawyer, so I can't specifically address legality. And I'm not licensed in D.C. However . . .

It is permissible to accept a higher offer for rental property. I was looking at the MLS (MRIS in the DC area) just yesterday for a house I'm going to be renting out. It's in Falls Church--quite desirable, overall. And I saw a couple of comps where the actual rental amount was above the listing amount. It's also a pretty hot market--average days on market is around 8. So, yes, it's permissible to offer more than the asking price.

You ask whether you have the "right" to expect that applications are processed and considered in the order THAT THEY WERE REQUESTED. Probably not. In fact, you probably don't have the right to expect that applications are considered in the order they were received. A landlord can pick and choose from among applicants, just as a seller can. And so long as the picking/choosing isn't based on some legally discriminatory element (race, religion, national origin, etc.), that's entire legal and entirely permissible.

I'm surprised that you received information on other applications submitted. But that's in your favor. Now you can apply and adjust your offer to make it more desirable (and more likely to be selected) by the landlord. If you have a Realtor, ask your Realtor for advice.

Hope that helps.
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Fri May 11, 2012
Ken Johnson answered:
Jessica;

Yes. There is no rule or law, or even convention, that tells a landlord when they can accept applications. In theory they could accept applications at any point during the lease. And in the situation you describe they have not even accepted that application, so the apartment technically remains available, and they are allowed to rent to the person they chose.
Ken Johnson
Ken@dcrealestate.com
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Wed Apr 8, 2009
CSB answered:
Good afternoon,

Landlords often ask for security deposits, is this what you mean by earnest money? If so, it is important to keep in mind that by DC law, security deposits can not exceed the amount of one moth's rent (i.e if the monthly rent is 2500, the security deposit can not be more than 2500)

Hope this helps,

Best,

Christopher
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Mon Nov 10, 2008
Amy Mermelstein answered:
If you do not intend to stay in the area, do not have enough money for a down payment or are in the process of fixing your credit then renting would be the way to go. Many landlords are leasing with the option to purchase... which is a good option if you plan to stay in the area and just need more time to accumulate a down payment or fix a small credit issue. A lease with the option can be structured in many ways. Typically an option fee is charged which is forfeited should you decide not to buy by an agreed upon date. Rent amount is usually higher than normal with a portion of your rent to be credited back to you if you buy the property. You are essentially locking in a price at todays value to purchase it in the future and forcing yourself to save money in the form of higher rent. Obviously there are other ways to accomplish saving this money on your own. And as a tenant in DC you are given the first right to purchase the property you rent should the owner decide to sell anyway. I think for some people lease with option is a good choice but many times it benefits the landlord more.

I have not heard of a property in foreclosure being offered for rent or lease to own. I would not suggest getting involved in that scenario at all.

All in all... if you feel you have the money, credit scores and are ready to take on the responsibility of homeownership... now is a great time to buy. There are many properties available and interest rates are low. Call or email me if you would like me to explain any part of the answer in more depth.
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