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Switching Real Estate Agents All Locations : Nationwide Real Estate Advice

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Activity 159
Showing results for Switching Real Estate Agents [Clear search]
Wed Nov 30, 2011
Kylee Roe answered:
Different lenders or lien holders may define this differently, depending on what they are willing to do for you. Basically, a loan mod changes some of the terms of your loan--such as lowering the interest rate, to make your loan more affordable. Usually, lien holders will ask you to either be in the loan modification program (applying for a loan mod.) or short selling. You should call your lender and ask if you can apply for a loan mod while your home is on the market. If you are already under contract with a buyer, however, you should consult with your Realtor regarding cancelling the sale and switching to the loan mod. program. Hope that helps! ... more
0 votes 5 answers Share Flag
Sat Nov 19, 2011
Mike Sullivan answered:
If you have a contract, no, if you only have an offer, yes. My question would be, how can an agent submit an offer you weren't ok with? An offer requires your signature, if you weren't ok, why did you sign it? Sounds to me as if the agent was doing their job in finding a buyer that was ready, 'willing' and able to make the offer....are you sure you're not just having second thoughts???? Many times all of us have these feelings, just second guessing our decision, thinking we could have made a better deal!!!

Best of luck in your home search!
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0 votes 11 answers Share Flag
Wed Nov 16, 2011
Patrick Fields answered:
Your question is like dangling a toy in front of an alert toddler! But, of course you know that! I'll take the bait...

1. A buyer will typically have little or no expense in exchange for the professional advise, opinion, and expertise offered by a Realtor - its a win/win.

2. Using a Realtor can save countless hours in delays, mistakes, and rework.

3. A Realtor is far better equipped to handle complex negotiations on your behalf much more expertly than the general buying public.

4. A Realtor has access to critial information about neighborhoods and property history that can potentially save you thousands of dollars and years of regret.

5. A strong agent will always have alternatives to offer with every choice and solutions to every possible problem that arises.

6. Even after purchase, a Realtor will be able to gain you access to vendor discounts on home improvement, landscaping and in many cases, retail home goods.

7. A Realtor can simply the entire transaction with detailed but simple explanations, counsel, and when necessary, a heavy hand on your behalf.

The list goes on and on and on, so, the real question is, why would you ever want to go it alone when "you have a friend in real estate" - Realtor Pat!
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0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Thu Oct 27, 2011
Gregorio Denny answered:
There is no lender that is going to guarantee funding until funding. An approval with conditions is the closest you will ever get until the money is wired. Switching lenders won't help. I am not a fan of ever removing contingencies but some agents seems to be unable to negotiate this into the contract, so it's a fact of life. A loan commitment always comes with conditions so you need to ask your loan officer to give you the straight story on what the conditions are and if there will be any issue with meeting them. ... more
0 votes 16 answers Share Flag
Tue Nov 8, 2016
Bill Eckler answered:
What are the issues...agent dissatisfaction is often traced back to circumstances that are beyond the agent's control. Before making a decision, it may be best to have that "heart-to-heard" conversation making the agent aware of your concerns. If the agent has the ability to make adjustments, it could be the beginning of a relationship that can get the job done.

On the other hand, if your meeting results in a lack of understanding and an unwillingness to accept responsibility, it may be to your advantage to consider other options.

Either way, putting the issues on the table and having a meaningful dialogue prior to making a decision is often the best course of action for everyone involved.

Good luck,

Bill
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0 votes 17 answers Share Flag
Sun Dec 1, 2013
Scott Godzyk answered:
There is no excuse for the lack of customer service, even if one is the busiest person on the planet, you make time for your clients. If you tried to reach her and no return call, then write a letter asking for a full release from your listing contract, she will either gove you the release and you can find a more hands on lising agent or will at least call you so you can tell her what is wrong, eeither she changes or you want out. You can always go to her office and wait... ... more
0 votes 17 answers Share Flag
Thu Sep 15, 2011
Janet Rivera answered:
If you have not signed any type of exclusivity representation agreement with the agent to represent you, then you should be fine. Sometimes is best not to sign one for situations like this. I suggest you contact another Real Estate Firm in your area.

If you need assistance finding a firm in your area please give me a call or send me an email and I would be happy to put you in contact with a firm in your area.

Janet Rios
Realtor - The Keyes Company
786-390-4076
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0 votes 12 answers Share Flag
Fri Dec 30, 2011
Global Real Estate Group, LLC answered:
You should be able to offer a land contract or seller financing. This way you aren't renting your condos but you are acting as the bank. There are many people looking for this option because it may be difficult for them to obtain a mortgage. I would consult an attorney about a land contract to make sure you know all of the details before moving forward but there are many homeowners who are seeking this option. I wish you the best of luck! ... more
0 votes 11 answers Share Flag
Sun May 15, 2011
David Cooper answered:
Your agent took in good faith what he was told, so you proceeded to make an offer, and it was rejected. The listing agent must feel some obligation to the buyer who is still trying to find funding, but you still might be in the right place at the right time, just keep pushing to find out if the funding doesn't happen, and resublit your offer

- David Cooper..Las Vegas Foreclosure Investor in Bank Owned REOs with Cash Flow . email or call for FREE daily list +1-7024997037 not a real estate agent
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0 votes 5 answers Share Flag
Wed Jul 24, 2013
Sergio Hernandez answered:
Rather than focusing on why it hasn't sold, ask yourself the following.

What is it specifically about your home that will make it so irresistable to a buyer, that you will invite an offer in the next 7 days?

If you can't think of anything, chances are the problem wasn't your previous Realtor.

"Priced right and shows well" is only the minimum standard in a buyers' market. You'll need to do a whole lot better to get noticed.

Now, ask yourself, what do I need to do to make my home a buyer magnet? When you determine what that is, do that!
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0 votes 13 answers Share Flag
Sun Nov 20, 2011
Don Maclary answered:
Mon Feb 14, 2011
Anna M Brocco answered:
What is your agent advising....for any legal rights you may have, consider consulting with an attorney who specializes in real estate, he/she can best advise as it relates to your specific situation.... ... more
0 votes 20 answers Share Flag
Sun Nov 24, 2013
Sean Morrissey answered:
Brooklyn -

Yes! You certainly can use the services of another real estate broker. However, I would recommend you communicate your thoughts and decision to your current broker and even go as far as put it in writing. If I can be of any further assistance, feel free to contact me via email.

Good Luck!

Sean
seanmorrissey@kw.com
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0 votes 11 answers Share Flag
Tue Feb 28, 2012
Melissa Williams answered:
I would fire that realtor and find a new one because she is not providing her fudiciar duty to you as the buyer, which she is required to if she is a Realtor.
0 votes 14 answers Share Flag
Mon Jan 10, 2011
Phil Rotondo answered:
Good Mornng Tina;
You may want to consult with another Real Estate Agent.
Have other units been recently sold? If so, this will give you an idea of comparable sales so that you can make an offer for your unit.
Everything is negotiable; especially today. You may be able to (a) get a lower price, (b) get a discount on available financing from the builder, or (c) get additional upgrades in the unit at the list price.
Good luck!!
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0 votes 15 answers Share Flag
Sun Jan 9, 2011
Tom Priester answered:
Jackie,

A whole lot depends on clearly defining your goals and a qualified Realtor will be well qualified to help you along that path. Moving to a new state is an experience I have enjoyed three times and there is nothing better than someone who is familiar with the are to help you along this path.

On the rent to won question there is a lot that will go into that decision; if you are not going to stay put for a minimum of 4 years you should probably rent. The value of the house you are contemplating, as well as the location, will also be a very important consideration. Some market segments have seemed to hit bottom while others will continue to feel downward pricing pressure. Interest rates need to be considered as well as a jump in rates by as little as 1% can have a significant impact on your purchasing power. Like I said a well qualified Realtor will be your best asset at this time of change.

A few recommendations I would make; I would tell you to not sign a buyer's broker agreement with anyone. This is a form an agent will use to tie you up and ensure any transaction you make will only be through them. Find an agent who is happy to perform their services with the knowledge that if they do not properly meet your expectations they will lose your business. Second, never call a listing agent about a home they have listed as their initial relationship with the seller will prevent you from working out the best deal. Finally, I would recommend that you interview at least three qualified agents to assist you and select one who you feel will have your best interests as their primary goal. I work almost entirely as a buyers agent and certainly would be honored to be on your list.

I hope this information is helpful but if you need anything additional please do not hesitate to give me a call.



Always at Your Service,


Tom Priester e-PRO
"Results Driven Real Estate"

Keller Williams Realty
561 308-0175
tom@tompriester.com
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0 votes 9 answers Share Flag
Sat Jan 8, 2011
Tom Weiskopf answered:
I believe you need to be open and honest with all parties - that means both agents, the sellers, the buyer and any lenders need to know what's going on - at all times.

The buyer should use the inspection period as an opportunity to shop for a lender - and it's OK to make a change as long as everyone is aware and in agreement. If the new lender can get the deal done with no adverse effect on the seller, it shouldn't be an issue. A change after that could delay the transaction and harm the parties. ... more
0 votes 19 answers Share Flag
Fri Jan 21, 2011
Christopher Baker answered:
Excellent area. Call my cell 407-408-5167 or e-mail me at glf929@hotmail.com and we can talk about what you are looking for and how I can help. George @ Keller Willams Realty.
0 votes 16 answers Share Flag
Fri Dec 17, 2010
Sadbuyer answered:
So sellers request another 3 weeks so the bank can accept the new offer. It goes to underwriting and they reject it based on the addendum that says we were going to give the sellers $1300, because it was a short sale. Time expires, the listing agents doesn't put anything into equator until 2 days before the new close date. So sellers then ask for another extension. We agreed to this new extension only if the sellers voids the $1300, which was required by our loan company. The sellers decides not to sign it and the deal is now off. we send the sellers a cancelation contract and they didn't sign that either. The sellers are now trying to keep the deposit and has already relisted the property as "for sale" in mls. Is this legal? Can they refuse to seign the cacelation and put the property back on the market without resolving escrow? Are the short sale seller even entitled to a deposit, since they are not allowed to profit from a short sale? ... more
0 votes 6 answers Share Flag
Thu Dec 16, 2010
Sadbuyer answered:
So sellers request another 3 weeks so the bank can accept the new offer. It goes to underwriting and they reject it based on the addendum that says we were going to give the sellers $1300, because it was a short sale. Time expires, the listing agents doesn't put anything into equator until 2 days before the new close date. So sellers then ask for another extension. We agreed to this new extension only if the sellers voids the $1300, which was required by our loan company. The sellers decides not to sign it and the deal is now off. we send the sellers a cancelation contract and they didn't sign that either. The sellers are now trying to keep the deposit and has already relisted the property as "for sale" in mls. Is this legal? Can they refuse to seign the cacelation and put the property back on the market without resolving escrow? Are the short sale seller even entitled to a deposit, since they are not allowed to profit from a short sale? ... more
0 votes 23 answers Share Flag
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