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San Mateo County : Real Estate Advice

  • All60
  • Local Info4
  • Home Buying22
  • Home Selling1
  • Market Conditions4

Activity 1,307
Tue Aug 18, 2015
Cindy Davis answered:
Rent to own properties are rare. I strongly recommend that you rent, and rebuild your credit until you qualify for a mortgage.
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Sat Aug 15, 2015
Mary Alonso asked:
If you can answer my question as soon as possible and/or help with any suggestion I would be very grateful.

Sincerely,

James
0 votes 0 Answers Share Flag
Tue Aug 11, 2015
Susie Kay answered:
What do you mean? It is your home in Daly City or San Antonio?
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Mon Jul 13, 2015
MegSM answered:
MyScreeningReport.com is a great resource independent rental owners. It's FREE to use. Simply create a Landlord account and invite applicants to apply - the applicant pays for their reports directly to MyScreeningReport.com. Reports are shared through a secure sharing platform that provides Landlords the assurance of accuracy and authenticity.

Reports are comprehensive and include rental & employment verifications - if requested. Customer service available 7 days/week.

www.myscreeningreport.com
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0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Sun Jul 12, 2015
Kristin answered:
Word on the street is the Admiralty has been struggling with a massive, over-budget construction project for quite a few years. They were apartments that converted to condos. They then had some construction issues and took a special assessment (mandatory payment from all residents) to do a project. Project was bigger than expected and residents fought an additional assessment. Many, many problems ensued including leans on properties.

I'd spend a lot of time digging into the details of their current situation before buying. My information is old so maybe they've resolved it all by now.
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0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Wed Jul 8, 2015
Linda Lowe answered:
Coyote Park! It has it all...beaches, hiking trails, nature museum, zoo, picnic areas and a large playground
0 votes 6 answers Share Flag
Mon Jul 6, 2015
Geogeoboy answered:
Hello Ms. Penny,
Please have your friend contact Ms. Boyd immediately at 6504835924. I say immediately because some other folks who are in negotiations are not ................anyway, its a long story. Just hurry and have your friend contact Ms Boyd . thank you and do not tell her what was not said. Anonymously Me ... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Wed Jul 1, 2015
Taljulavit answered:
Not safe, if you want a closer look i would suggest the menlo park police departments records.

http://www.menlopark.org/Archive.aspx?AMID=63

Most reported crimes in menlo park are theft, and vandalism. While belle haven has the occasional shootings, burglary, and arrests for various crimes. ... more
1 vote 7 answers Share Flag
Sun Jun 28, 2015
Taljulavit answered:
I would check out the Menlo Park Police logs.
http://www.menlopark.org/Archive.aspx?AMID=63
0 votes 9 answers Share Flag
Fri Jun 12, 2015
Lolamonroe0908 asked:
My voucher is for $1548 for a one bedroom & $1975 for a two bedroom. Please let me know if you have a property or know where I can find one. Thank you!
0 votes 0 Answers Share Flag
Fri Jun 12, 2015
UpNest Top Realtors answered:
At UpNest, we're providing services of around 4.75% to 5.5% for our customers in the Bay Area.

If you submit your home on our site (http://www.upnest.com), top agents will compete to earn your listing. When agents compete, they bring out their most competitive rates and value added services.

In regards to taxes, you should read about transfer tax: http://www.upnest.com/1/post/transfer-tax-who-pays-what-in-sf-bay-area-counties/
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0 votes 5 answers Share Flag
Sun May 31, 2015
Casey Mooney asked:
i'd like to only see houses that are on the market, not houses that are in default but not on the market
0 votes 0 Answers Share Flag
Sat May 30, 2015
Capterk answered:
No. The pole was probably there before the wall was built and it is likely that the wall is not supporting the pole. If the wall is supporting four feet of earth, then the distance from the top of teh back fill to hte bottom of the wall's foundation will be greater than four feet, In this case, you will need to get a permit if you replace the wall, (but maybe not if you reinforce it).

To get a permit you will need an engineer's (or architect's) stamped plans and calculations.

To reinforce the wall, you may only need a contractor.

Contractors usually give free estimates (but then have to try to sell you something). Engineers usually charge you for a site visit, but they then may tell you not to worry until it gets a lot worse.

Good contractor is Al Mosqueda at Axsis Construction i south City, good engineers are Kembcon in Burlingame.
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0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Fri May 29, 2015
Steve Garrett answered:
I am able to lend on them @ Armed Forces Bank.
0 votes 13 answers Share Flag
Sat May 23, 2015
Margaret Kimball answered:
My husband and I are struggling with the question of purchasing in the sane real estate market of LaHonda, a beautiful place off the beaten path. But, a bit of a journey from Stanford Hospital.

To stay on the peninsula, we have to 'hope' that a special deal falls into our lap, in terms of decent living, price, and community.

Our choices are limited. We do not know enough about rural issues... Septic, wells, leach fields?, heat your house? Keep your grounds tidy...

Would anyone want to offer a summary of the differences we could expect if we were to choose LaHonda as our retirement home? We could consider a rental for a year, or a purchase could be now or deferred by a good rental.

The market is maddening, just need to work out the drive. Sitting in traffic, however, is commensurate to a winding, timely, drive, but an ambulance arrival time may be extended...

Thoughts anyone? Thanks!
Margaret
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0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Tue May 12, 2015
Lilaora answered:
If you're in the market to buy a home, you've probably heard the rule of thumb that you shouldn't buy a home unless you can put down 20% to avoid paying Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). Why is 20% the magic number and what is PMI?

It's a fact that the more you put down, the lower your monthly mortgage payment and the less you'll owe the bank. It's also a fact that homebuyers who put down at least 20% don't have to pay Private Mortgage Insurance, an added insurance policy that protects the lender if you are unable to pay your mortgage. As the borrower, you pay the monthly PMI premiums, and the lender is the beneficiary. However, if putting down 20% will deplete all of your savings and leave you with no financial cushion, it's probably not in your best interest.

Fortunately, when it comes to the size of your down payment you have choices – and a growing number of today's buyers are putting down between 5 and 10%. Sure, you'll have to pay PMI for a conventional loan with a down payment of less than 20%, but it means you'll be able to take advantage of today's historically low mortgage rates and affordable home prices in many parts of the country. And, once you've built equity of 20% in your home, making the amount you owe on your mortgage 80% or less of its value, you can cancel your PMI and remove that added expense from your monthly payment. For borrowers with FHA loans, you'll be responsible for paying FHA mortgage insurance premiums for the life of the loan.

The cost of PMI varies based on your loan-to-value ratio – the amount you owe on your mortgage compared to its value – and credit score, but you can expect to pay between $30 and $70 per month for every $100,000 borrowed. It's no doubt an added cost, but it's enabling you to buy now and begin building equity versus waiting 5 to 10 years to build enough savings for a 20% down payment.

Take a look at how a $200,000 home looks with 5% down and 20% down, below, to see the impact on a monthly mortgage payment. Not surprisingly, the mortgage payment with less down will cost more – especially until you reach 20% equity in your home – but the value may be getting your foot in the door.

As for the rule of thumb about putting 20% down: Yes, you won't have to pay PMI, but remember you have plenty of choices when it comes to your down payment. Carefully evaluate your finances to determine how much you can afford and talk with your lender or housing professional about what makes best sense for you and your particular situation.

Reference Link: http://vastreamlinemortgage.net/loan-process/
... more
2 votes 12 answers Share Flag
Thu May 7, 2015
Antonio Prado answered:
Hello Mila,

There were a few homes in Daly City/ San Mateo County within the past few months that were good investments. Send me a an e-mail and I'll add you to my investors list and keep you updated when they come to the market.

Sincerely,
Antonio Prado
Better Homes and Gardens - Real Estate
antonio.prado@gobhg.com | 650.270.3589
Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/antoniopradorealtor
Instagram: prado_antonio
... more
0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Sat May 2, 2015
Micah Matson answered:
You always have a say. If you are going FSBO, you could choose to not offer a commission at all to a Buyer's agent and just hope that you can sell the home yourself. However, I would not recommend that since most buyers are already working with an agent and agents will not show your home if you are not offering a commission. I would offer the going rate if I were you. When you lower the commission you risk agents not showing the home at all and that isn't worth the money you might save. ... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
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