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Crime & Safety in Portland : Real Estate Advice

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  • Local Info68
  • Home Buying370
  • Home Selling68
  • Market Conditions37

Activity 10
Tue Jun 20, 2017
Derek Goude answered:
Head to the city's website portlandmaps.com and type in an address near the intersection.

Then scroll down on the right side to public safety. Your crime stats are there.
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Sun Apr 9, 2017
Amiemorgan8 answered:
What zip code is a low crime upper class homes in Tigard oregon
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Sat Jul 23, 2016
Heart11caring answered:
RedfinFirst of all he should Sell it. Homes go fast..even fixers. You could get a buyer in days (lthen there is an agent who can perhaps help guide you). Trying to be an out of state landlord is crazy for your friend. . The City of Portland (call the city)has rules for eviction but the notice is simple and can be served on them as well as mailed to them.. That is cheaply done but the sooner that is done, the better and the next step is to get it enforced. ... more
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Wed Nov 19, 2014
The Stephen FitzMaurice Team answered:
You can go to Portlandmaps.com and find all crime data (including violent crimes) based on any address you input. Works great!
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Tue Apr 1, 2014
Sue Briggs answered:
I suggest visit the area and get acquainted. There are many bikers, walkers, shoppers and such out enjoying the scenery or that area in which they live. Home owners love to talk about their home and what they love about the area. Can't think they would speak love if living in fear. ... more
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Tue Jul 16, 2013
Tom Inglesby answered:
You don't mention if you will be buying or renting? Buying close in will be more expensive but location you always pay for. Renting is the same higher cost for location. Probably figure $1.50-$2 per foot or more depending on size and location. Go to www.Portlandmaps.com and look under crime stats on top bar but this can be misleading because they lump all crimes together. So take NW Portland up on NW 23 many shops, restaurants and hospital but a high crime rate for car break-ins but not much else and a great safe place to live. Many renters and no garages so there is really only street parking. Great transportation light rail and bus to town. Let me know how I can help you further? Good luck you will love it here. Tom Inglesby, Broker, RE/MAX Equity Group ... more
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Wed Aug 1, 2012
Alison Hillman answered:
Hi there-

I believe you are taking about Reno, NV. Check out Trulia's Crime Maps to get a sense of what types of crimes are happening where:

http://www.trulia.com/real_estate/Reno-Nevada/crime/

Good luck!
Ali, Community Manager
... more
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Tue Jun 5, 2012
Carla Muss-Jacobs, Principal Broker/Owner ~ Exclusive Buyers Agent ~ ABR, CEBA answered:
When I had my son I never asked that question. And perhaps because I've traveled extensively to developing nations all over the world and saw vasts amounts of poverty and children begging in the streets, I consider the majority of places in the nation "safe."

And "safe" is all so subjective and whenever someone poses this question it's nice to have them explain what they're fearful of, what does safe mean to them, etc.

I've just got done reading a great book: "Free Range Kids" Might be a good summer read??

Carla Muss-Jacobs, Principal Broker/Owner
EBA Portland, LLC
Exclusive Buyer Agency Since 1999
www.BuyersAgentPortland.com
... more
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Tue Apr 29, 2008
Wendy Boso answered:
Brooklyn is a great neighborhood where prices continue to appreciate like much of the eastside of Portland. Brooklyn is starting to have more and more shopping and coffee opportunities. You'll just have to ask yourself "what is the most important to me?" You can check out neighborhood stats at www.portlandmaps.com

North Portland is also a good option. Can I ask what your reasoning is for living so far from work? Is it the charm of older homes? Likeability of the city? You may want to look in Multnomah Village on the westside....oooooh I said it, Westside.


Wendy Boso
John L. Scott-NE
... more
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Mon Mar 3, 2008
Laurel answered:
Sorry I didn't read your question months ago. I lived in downtown San Mateo and moved to this area in the past year looking for a comparable neighborhood. There is nothing like that downtown area here, but you can find some neighborhoods that may have some similar features.

Some here have mentioned Multnomah: it's really small, its one grocery is small/limited, no movie theater, no drugstore, a few shops and restaurants, drive/bus to the nearest library. It's a pocket of small businesses.

The Hawthorne area has more to choose from WRT groceries, but imagine a smaller El Camino Real. A couple groceries along a long stretch of avenue, shops, restaurants, but generally strung along a few miles of street rather than compact blocks.

You have to keep in mind that as cities go, Portland does not have an affluent history and therefore the old houses on the east side (and there's lots of them) may have been rentals for a long while, may not have been even middle-class when built, so the charm is limited. If you visit in the winter, especially after reading all the Portland booster materials, you may be surprised that many of the residential neighborhoods look kind of ratty compared to the cities of the Peninsula.

Be aware that a lot of Portlanders don't think too highly of the "Calis" who come here with the kind of money you have, overpay for a house, and thereby contribute to driving up the cost of housing (which is out of reach for most in the median income range). You could probably get a McMansion in the suburbs for what you have, or a flipper special in close. But you'll probably be paying too much unless you're looking for a McMansion. The conventional wisdom among the non-realtors is to watch the market and get a feel for housing here before you jump in, because there's a likelihood prices will continue to slide downward and next year you could get more for your money (and maybe not need to spend as much for what you want).
... more
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