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37923 : Real Estate Advice

  • All9
  • Local Info0
  • Home Buying5
  • Home Selling1
  • Market Conditions0

Activity 7
Sat Sep 24, 2016
cammmy31 asked:
Sat Sep 24, 2016
cammmy31 asked:
Mon Apr 25, 2016
Sally Grenier answered:
First, let me ask WHY? Keep in mind that Trulia is NOT a real estate company, an auction company or even a property management company. Trulia (and Zillow and Realtor.com) are just marketing sites that offer info about buying, selling, and renting. The listings you see come from various sources, such as local MLSs (multiple listing services), public records, and individual properties for rent. The listings can be very outdated and have inaccurate info. If you're not buying or selling then you really should care what this site says about your house. If you insist on getting this info changed, then you need to correct it at the source -- your county records department. But then guess what? You could be opening up a can of worms. You can have the county correct the info, but then they'll likely raise your taxes! And if you had work done that wasn't permitted, then you could face fines. Regarding your home's "value" this site means NOTHING. The values are terribly inaccurate. The only way to get an accurate picture of your home's TRUE "Fair Market Value" is to have a Realtor do a market analysis.

I just wrote a blog post on the subject:

http://boulderhousesearch.com/blog?post=But-Zillow-Says&xid=040105-01
... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Mon Mar 30, 2015
Vicki Duncan-Murdock answered:
I have a wonderful listing that has a second kitchen and separate living quarters.
The home is listed at $675,000 an offers a main level master suite, family room with fireplace and built-ins, gourmet kitchen/breakfast room that is open to a keeping room with fireplace. The basement
is partially finished and offers a ton of space!! 3 Car Garage and Level Yard.
Please fell free to call my cell at 865.388.1040 or email at vduncan2001@yahoo.com to schedule a showing. I will be hosting an open house at this gorgeous home on Aoril 12, 2-4PM.
600
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Sat Feb 21, 2015
Emilee Smith answered:
www.raidsonline.com will give you crime data
0 votes 11 answers Share Flag
Wed Aug 27, 2014
Jess Shepherd answered:
There are a few sites you can visit for this information. http://www.cityofknoxville.org
http://www.city-data.com/crime/crime-Knoxville-Tennessee.html are just a couple if you google crime map knoxville tn there are many websites that appear. ... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Sun Jul 13, 2008
Michael Newton answered:
If the buyer is getting a FHA mortgage the age of the roof could be a factor on whether or not they can get a loan, on your home, based on the criteria that the appraiser will have on his checklist of major cost related items based on life expectancy (roof is one of those items), safety issues, etc... Selling an older home with roof, HVAC and other major items can be challenging to sell regarding the type of loan the buyer is obtaining and a buyer obtaining a Conventional mortgage or paying cash would be a better opportunity "type" of buyer for these types of homes. I always recommend to my seller (before I list an older home that has not had major improvements) to get a home inspection before we put the home on the market. This will tell you and your agent what the major concerns and issues will be when an offer is negotiated and accepted and the home inspection is done for the buyer. You, the seller, having a home inspection can help you/agent make decisions (with your agents advice based on the market and your current competition for your home) on what to fix/repair or replace, in order to not lose a buyer after a contract has been secured and all of the major issues come up after the buyer gets a home inspection. If you can't afford to perform the repairs than price the home accordingly and have your agent reflect that this has been done in the information that the buyer will read about the home before they come out and take a look. Otherwise, the buyer will be "turned off' and move on to the next home and not give your home a second thought. The home warranty can help and an educated/experienced agent can help you get the cost handled within the transaction, not out of your pocket, which means that the buyer is actually paying for it. The buyer is paying for everything because they are the ones bringing the money to the table. You and your agent just need to figure out offer price (GROSS) minus all of the associated expenses and what your (the seller) NET, better known as "Bottom Line", will be when you walk away from the closing table.

Mike Newton, Broker
Keller Williams Realty
865.694.5904 (o)
865.332.0164 (c)
mikenewton@kw.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/michaeljnewton
... more
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