Home inspection report. Any advice?

Asked by Ruthless, 60558 Tue Oct 23, 2007

Some of the home inspector's items listed as a "possible compromise to the safety of the occupants or the integrity of the property" were new construction items approved by the building inspector and other items were untouched in the renovation and just part of being an old home. The inspector suggested they "deserve prompt attention" to eliminate the condition. Any advice?

Help the community by answering this question:

+ web reference
Web reference:

Answers

6
Mike Kelly A…, Agent, Santa Rosa, CA
Tue Oct 23, 2007
BEST ANSWER
Ruth, it depends if this is "boiler" plate information or was actually in the "action item" section of the home inspection report. I know many Home Inspector's list the "action items" in the front of the report. This is convienent for discerning those items which need attention. Make sure the Home Inspector's computer just isn't kicking this out!! I know Win Home Inspections computer program does this automatically and the inspector, just by checking off a box, will make this paragaph come up. Where you AT the home for the inspection? If not, then get him BACK to the property and have him explain himself!! For $350.00 its' the least they can do. Your only problem is NOW you have to disclose the "known" material facts to the buyer. In the greatest state of California this would need to be disclosed which in turn brings about the 3 days release clause on the TDS.
1 vote
Ruthless, , 60558
Sat Oct 27, 2007
Ten or 15 years ago when home inspectors came onto the scenes, real estate agents hated them because they were the "deal killers."

But Richard:
Today they are part of doing business. I think your answer lacks a constructive solution. Michael's answer of "boiler plate" provides a way of satisfying a buyers concern as an inspectors CYA clause. Michael's answer also educates others who might be reading this thread.

In IL the contract clause was changed to only address major or safety issue. But the home inspectors address minor issues which is good for the buyer to know. It's just when they receive a long laundry list, it scares them. I'd like to see more ADVICE on how to handle the situation when you are dealing with just another opportunity negotiate or buyers remorse?

Congrats Michael on best answer.
Ruth
0 votes
Richard M. J…, , Sherman Oaks, CA
Fri Oct 26, 2007
Ruth, show some love....I know my answer is good too.
0 votes
Ruthless, , 60558
Fri Oct 26, 2007
If there aren't more answers, Michael wins Best Answer. I did give you the Thumbs Up.
Ruth
0 votes
Richard M. J…, , Sherman Oaks, CA
Tue Oct 23, 2007
Your inspector really knows how to scare away the buyer and cost everybody time and money. I suggest the home inspector be more specific and how to address the issue. Now lets take apart your inspector. Is the inspector a licensed general contractor? What affiliation does the inspector have.
0 votes
Ruthless, , 60558
Tue Oct 23, 2007
Thanks Michael:
I appreciate your advice. The buyer's attorney wrote, "in need of repair or credit" in the cover letter. The inspection report pages attached had a boiler plate heading saying "possible" and the other quotes above, but the bulleted items were specific. I scheduled my electrician to go over the issues that were "real" in my opinion. But when you have that lumped together with "piece of trim missing" and some bullet points say, "prompt correction is recommended" but none of the items say, "must be corrected" is this just a negotiating tactic?

Please other agents, any advice? I searched other inspection questions and they all seemed to be geared toward the buyers.

Thanks,
Ruth
0 votes
Search Advice
Search
Ask our community a question

Email me when…

Learn more