Dual Agency - is it a good or bad idea?

Asked by Ruthless, 60558 Tue Sep 4, 2007

Dual Agency is legal in IL and illegal in other states. I had to sign a disclosure whether I would allow my listing agent to enter into dual agency for my property. Does Dual Agency indirectly favor a buyer or seller or disadvantage both equally?

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Answers

36
Zoraida Matos, , 60106
Tue Sep 4, 2007
BEST ANSWER
I dont think it's a disadvantage in some situations it might be relatives or close friends and you are being used to handle contract and save them both on commission... but they have already agreed to what the price is.....

I think that the buyer and the seller just never know if confidential info is released and like whats the lowest the seller is willing to accept.......
and god forbid the buyer gets very close to that # .... I think its only natural for the seller to think that the agent told the buyer and they probably didn't......
3 votes
Deborah Madey, Agent, Brick, NJ
Wed Sep 5, 2007
Dual agency is legal in NJ. I do find quite a bit of difference in having the same agent represent both parties versus two different agents within the same office. While dual agency is legal, it is asking one to serve two masters, which can only be done when both want exactly the same thing. While I have been a dual agent in transactions, I believe it would be better for the industry if such were not an option. Since real estate is regulated at a state level, we will never find consistency.

For years, the value of the real estate agent was access to info. While a small percentage of the public found value in “representation”, in the eyes of most, Realtors were a commodity. Any one of us with a lockbox key and MLS access were the answer to what the consumer wanted, and that was information. Listings were (and to a large extent remain) the key to leads. We, as an industry, taught the consumers to look to us first to open the gate to information. While the best in this industry have long been strong advocates for their clients, and pride themselves in skillful negotiations, the public looks at us in mass, not for the value of the best.

Why does a buyer end up in a dual agent transaction? Because the buyer made an inquiry on a listing? That’s a lead, and we all look for new biz, and we want to sell the properties for the sellers we represent. Is the agent working with the buyer and happens to take them to a listing of their own, because they really believe it is a good oppty for that buyer? Does a buyer receive a referral to an agent and coincidentally, one of that agent’s listings meets their needs well?

When dual agency happens because the buyer calls for info or steps into an open house and becomes interested in the subject property, has that buyer chosen to be in dual agency, or did they happen to fall into it? Despite all the disclosures, many do not understand agency. Typically, even when handed a disclosure or the subject of agency is mentioned, buyers will often quickly say, “yes, I know all about that.” Often we don’t really know how well they understand.

Once an agent acts between two parties on a transaction, it becomes impossible to advocate for one party over the other. You may try to find a middle ground that makes everyone happy, but is that true agency? In dual agency, the scales may tip ever so slightly toward the seller, particularly when the buyer is previously unknown to the agent. Clearly, I am not saying the agent is dismissing the buyer, only that an established relationship on one side may tip the scale, even if ever so slightly.

I once had a buyer call me who told me he only dealt with listing agents when buying property . His reasoning, he believed he had the advantage in gaining inside info and the agent would push the sale since they could double end the commission. I told him I would not represent him as a buyer (as a dual agent), but I would show him the property on behalf of my sellers. I did show him the property and asked him not to disclose any info to me that he did not want me to pass on to the seller. I advised that I would be happy to provide any and all info about the property to him as a sellers agent.

I have been a dual agent, and may find myself there again. I will not turn away the business when my best assessment indicates I can make a smooth transaction for all. I have had another agent help with the negotiations of offer and acceptance and then picked up and handled the rest of the details of the transaction individually. There are benefits to dual agency in faster and smoother communications and less chance of mix ups.

Bottom line: I think it is better in almost all cases, for each client to have separate and individual representation. Many transactions conducted by a dual agent close successfully with all parties pleased. Still, the risk for potential problems supersedes the benefit.
4 votes
Voices Member, , Benton County, OR
Mon Sep 7, 2009
Renee...Mellow out!

You and your opinion on this Topic does not concern me in the least, you have every right to post any comments or Questions you wish. I don't follow anyone around and I don't speak for anyone but myself.

I don't care who said what or attacked who in some other thread.
I gave my opinion like you give yours.
If you wish to begin a dispute with me by tossing an accusation my way I will be happy to participate.

Continue accusing me of having some agenda or being interested enough to follow you and we will begin to trade comments wherever you wish.

You've posted at Trulia long enough plus posted enough questions recently on this Topic and participated in enough discussions about it to know THERE WAS NO REASON TO POST on this 2 year old question besides using it to post your opinion again.
Just because you can does not mean you should and using that argument (I can if I want to) in this situation is lame IMO.
3 votes
Voices Member, , Benton County, OR
Mon Sep 7, 2009
Suzette

No one is questioning the relevance of the Topic or attempting to stop it from being discussed. It has been discussed Daily for quite a while now.

Just digging up a two year old question when there have already been ongoing threads discussing it, new questions on this Topic every day and when the person who dug it up asked this question herself several times today plus posted new questions about it for a week or so already.

Why dig up a Two year old question just to have another place to post your view does become a Relevant Question and one cannot but wonder what the agenda by doing so is.

Renee knows she has already commented on several threads giving her views and has posted a # of questions looking for discussion about it. That's fine but this....One wonders what digging this question up accomplishes?
3 votes
Okay….My Agent never revealed to me that she would be in Dual Agency….
nor explained the Disclosures…Take that one ….Why?…obviously she had possible a previous experience with someone more well versed in Double Comm…..but I as a seller had numerous suspicions during the six mos. contract as the lowering of my price and the same buyers name kept coming up…I was correct in my intuition…no other Buyer would ever be given a fair shake at my apartment other than the first buyer who my agent had engaged…I believe this must be very common in NYC due to the low earnings of a Studio….345.000
But I think this is duplicitous,shady,and appears to Railroad me the Sellar, to sell to this client , signed by my Agent,who is vying for my apartment…………..
Flag Fri Apr 18, 2014
Paul Slaybau…, Agent, Scottsdale, AZ
Thu Sep 20, 2007
I'm late on this thread, but dual agency can be tricky. I often waffle on whether it can be beneficial or harmful. On the one hand, you are in a position as an agent to limit miscommunication. One of the biggest dealkillers is simple miscommunication. By being the only person in the middle, you are in a position to relay demands and concerns correctly. You can also present such demands in a much less adversarial manner than another agent, who is puffing up his/her chest on behalf of the buyer. In short, the agent has a much more direct impact on bringing the two sides together for a mutually beneficial transaction. The negative is that you, as an agent, will be privvy to more information than you would be ordinarily. So you must constantly be on guard not to divulge any private information that might alter the course of negotiation. Further, there is always the question of whether a dual agent will push as hard for his client(s) when representing the middle rather than being purely the champion of the seller. In the end, I think it all boils down to the competency of the individual agent. I would much rather have one terrific agent guiding the course of the transaction rather than having a second agent involved that is a total bozo. In this age of buyer agency, we often forget that the role of a Realtor is to negotiate and close transactions. We have gotten much too wrapped up in the issue of representation, as if we are lawyers. When agents get too carried away with being the pitbull for their client, they often put the transaction in jeopardy. So give me the experienced agent who can bring about a meeting of the minds rather than two "advocate agents" who ultimately end up representing no one's best interests by playing the part of adversaries.

So the gist of my answer: It is definitely a good idea. Sometimes. Except when it is bad. Maybe. Or maybe not. Ask me again in 10 minutes and I will have 5 new pros and cons.
3 votes
Suzette West, , Port Orchard, WA
Mon Sep 7, 2009
Regardless of whether this questions came yesterday, last month, or last year--the topic remains relevant. Consumers need to understand that they have a choice to make, and that dual agency is not in their best interest.
2 votes
Bill Schwent, Agent, Santa Fe, NM
Sat Mar 29, 2008
No better guidance can be found than that given by NAR and local boards' attorneys:
3.4.1 Dual Agency
A large number of Board attorneys express serious concerns about Dual Agency. As one attorney stated, “Dual agency is a legal oxymoron.” The attorneys are concerned that both licensees and their clients do not understand the nature of dual agency or the agent's duties and obligations. “Agents can't explain it, consumers don't understand it, lawyers recoil from it, and the courts, by and large, haven't yet put it to the test. It looks fine on paper, but isn't working in practice.” The attorneys are also concerned that even if licensees do understand their duties, they cannot adequately represent both parties. “Very few agents are able to be completely loyal and objective on behalf of two principals. Many still don't understand it or govern themselves accordingly .... Dual agency is simply impossible to abide by in its purest sense and agents have a terrible time trying not to cross the line.” Attorneys also link the problem to breach of Fiduciary Duty, again noting that licensees do not appreciate what being a fiduciary entails.
Web Reference:  http://www.remax-santafe.com
2 votes
Mr.P, , Arizona
Tue Sep 11, 2007
is it a good or bad idea?

That is entirely up to the quality of agent that you have hired.

I have only been a part of three dual agency
one closed, peacefully with all party`s satisfied.
Two fell apart, not do to dual agency, however to a large price decrepency.

I believe that dual agency is the ultimate test of a full service Realtors negotiations skills.
I personally enjoy the challenge.


"Does Dual Agency indirectly favor a buyer or seller or disadvantage both equally?"
I don't think that this is a fair statement.

In my limited experience all parties have been equally satisfied.

However new home sales are mostly dual agency.
New home sales do play a big part of our current economic problems
2 votes
Deborah Engel…, , San Diego, CA
Tue Sep 4, 2007
Although legal in California, I try to avoid dual agency. When I have a seller and a potential buyer for that property is interested, I ask another agent to work with that buyer. I don't think that dual agency favors either buyer or seller, but I feel strongly that there are potential conflicts between each side's needs, that it is difficult to effectively advocate or negotiate for each client. I see it similar to asking a lawyer to sue someone and having that same lawyer represent the defendant. It just can't doesn't completely work. You end up being more of a mediator than a representative, in my opinion.
2 votes
Sylvia Barry,…, Agent, Marin, CA
Tue Sep 4, 2007
I really think it depends on the Realtor you work with and how much you trust the Realtor to be fair, honest, and loyal.

I had a couple of listings where the sellers, without me even brining up the subject, would first told me that they did not want me to be dual agent; after a while, they would tell me that they really wish I'd be the one to represent both sides because the felt they could trust me to do that.

I took that as a compliment.

Although I officially don't agree with dual agency, but I also feel that if both sides have the same goal and agree on the terms and are upfront, there is really nothing wrong with dual agency. But you have to know that agent really well.

Sylvia
2 votes
Voices Member, , Benton County, OR
Tue Sep 8, 2009
Trulia can truly be strange and sometimes the interactions with others surpass Strange....

I invite you to join us on the Practical Suggestions thread I'd appreciate hearing your opinion on the Topic and all are working hard to make it a Civil and enjoyable discussion..

Many appreciate your contributions of that I am sure..............
1 vote
Voices Member, , Benton County, OR
Tue Sep 8, 2009
Patrick
Am aware of the Top Contributor issue, discussed it here yesterday ....http://www.trulia.com/voices/Home_Selling/I_would_like_pract…

and many other times with Trulia and on other threads since they changed it.....
http://www.trulia.com/blog/discovertrulia/2009/03/trulia_voi…

I do not see that Dual Agency as a great subject has much to do with answering this question as the person who did so posted several new Questions yesterday to discuss Dual Agency.( I think what I already said).......

My second comment was a response to the suggestion I follow her or anyone else around for some conspiratorial reason. I merely expressed my opinion simple as that.

I do want to say I've always enjoyed your views/comments, consider you to be one of the Agents that helps consumers and appreciate your using some of your time to be at Trulia....

It's just possible we might disagree on using old questions to have a platform to push an Opinion that has plenty of current places/questions available and claim you are doing it for the Consumers....

That weird Non-Pro guy, Dunes
1 vote
Debra (Debbi…, Agent, Livingston, NJ
Mon Sep 7, 2009
FYI this question was asked 2 years ago.....last answer 1 year ago...
1 vote
Lisa Hill, , Port Orange, FL
Sat Mar 29, 2008
Dual agency had been illegal in Florida for many years now. I think Elvis said it right. "It's a law suit waiting to happen", which is why it's no longer legal in Florida. We have single agency (the agent can represent a buyer or seller exclusively), and we have "Transaction Brokers", which probably 95% of all brokerages use. As a matter of fact, in Florida, the buyer is supposed to assume the agent they call, at the point of contact, is operating as a Transaction Broker.

When operating as a single agent, anything the agent or client says in answer to someone else's question, the answer from the agent and/or client, operating as a single agent (buyer's agent or seller's agent) can be believed as coming straight from the mouth of each other. The Transaction Broker relationship is what replaced dual agency. If you want to read the differences between each type of representation in Florida, you can follow this link. http://www.lisahillrealtor.com/FloridaRealtorsLegalRepresentation . And I apologize for having to send you to my own web site. You're in IL, so obviously I'm not trying to solicit your business, but the link I was going to give you is for agents only and required everyone to log in.

Good luck. I hope you're able to find all the answers you need.
1 vote
Alan May, Agent, Evanston, IL
Sat Mar 29, 2008
Personally, I think that dual agency (which is still legal in Illinois) is a lawsuit waiting to happen. The agent who takes on both sides, now has only one client in the deal... himself.

He can no longer give his expertise and advice to either side, and must remain cautiously neutral. One of the reasons the sellers hired the agent was for his expertise in negotiations and handling of the inspection and balance of transaction, and by doing dual-agency, he has effectively removed that expertise from the equation.

The buyer, also, hired the agent, in part, for his abilities as a negotiator, and that's now been removed. He can't give advice on what items to ask for credits on as part of the inspection, how much to ask for, whether to ask for a credit, repair or replacement, and has been reduced to a neutered psychotherapist, asking "well... what do YOU think you should do?"...

and... why would I enter into the "morass" of dual-agency, when I have the neater, cleaner, safer option of "designated-agency", where I can designate another agent (either from my office, or an outside office) as the agent for the buyer... knowing now that the buyer is fully-represented, I can request a referral fee from the new agent (less than 50%... preferably no more than 25%... anything more, and it would now be considered UNDISCLOSED dual-agency, which would be even worse!! When a lawsuit is filed, they'll follow the money, and if you're getting the lion's share, then you didn't really give the client away, now, did you?)... this is a win-win.

I get more money that I was expecting... I get to refer a client to another good agent, and know that the buyer is now fully-represented... no conflict of interest... happy buyer, happy seller, happy TWO agents!! Win, Win, Win, Win!
1 vote
Ruthless, , 60558
Fri Sep 21, 2007
Paul, I agree. I think that is why I had such a hard time awarding the best answer. We signed yes when we listed the home and both my partner and I knew what it meant without the agents explaining it. We couldn't decide so we asked the agents to explain it and give their opinion. The agents couldn't decide. I think what I ended up suggesting is that we can cross that bridge when we come to it and do a referral if it doesn't feel right.
Ruh
1 vote
Carrie Crowe…, Agent, Southaven, MS
Wed Sep 5, 2007
Ute, If your relationship with your sellers is less than perferct, even if no fault of your own, say they are getting a divorce and the whole process has been strained, I will always refer to another agent and get a small referral fee. On the other hand if it is a slam dunk and everybody is happy negotiating was minimal, I see no reason to not to represent both. In a listing appt when I discuss this with a seller, I always tell them, should an occasion arise for me to represent both sides, I will discount the commission and we write it in the listing agreement. Most agents I talk to say they rarely double end a transaction.
1 vote
Ute Ferdig, Agent, Newcastle, CA
Tue Sep 4, 2007
Dual agency is legal in CA, but I have never done it. I go over it with ever seller when I explain the agency disclosure form. To most sellers it does not mean a whole lot until they are in a dual agency situation. To me it's like suggesting to a plaintiff that it's ok for me to also represent the defendant in the same case. Although representation of a buyer by an agent from the same brokerage as the listing agent is technically speaking a dual agency relationship, I personally do not have a problem working with a buyer's agent from my office. I don't feel like my loyalities are split. I know it may not be easy to give up that other commission, but to me it's the right thing. I am curious how people feel about getting a referral fee for referring a buyer to another agent to avoid having the dual representation by the same agent. Any thoughts?
Web Reference:  http://www.go2kw.com
1 vote
Elaine Strat…, Other Pro, NY,
Tue Apr 1, 2014
DISADVANTAGE….Especially when the seller is not informed,uninformed consent, that the agent would be representing both sides………..first lawsuit….withholding information.…secondly very simply first offer will be accepted for the Buyer who is signed to your agent………..no multiple bids,no MLS,
no cobrokering to get the highest pice thru a pool of interested buyers.
Yes excellent location…New York City…….2010…Upper Eastside……………301 east 62nd, street…
All for Double Ending a deal………….ask your agent this important question or you the Principal tell them in no way do u want Dual Agency………Read the complicated Disclosure ,as well as Designated Agency relieves any liability for the Brokerage representing the Agent….all for Double ending a Deal…..that is Illegal or should be,or subagency………………or your attorney should make you aware

..
0 votes
Suzette West, , Port Orchard, WA
Sat Sep 12, 2009
Dunes,

I was merely stating a fact that Dual Agency is still a relevant topic. Stating facts as they are is--in my opinion-- professional conduct. We can agree to disagree.
0 votes
Voices Member, , Benton County, OR
Wed Sep 9, 2009
Lisa

Up above the posted comments under the answer button you'll see Email alerts..

Just click on it and change your settings for this question..Presto no more alerts...

Sorry
0 votes
Lisa Hill, , Port Orange, FL
Wed Sep 9, 2009
OK. Can everyone PLEASE stop posting to this old question, so I can quit getting it in my e-mail!? Or please tell me how to make it STOP?? I'd like to answer questions that I have not already answered.

That's something I'd like to know anyway. How do I stop the e-mails I'm receiving on old questions, or on questions where I accidentally checked the box.
0 votes
Voices Member, , Benton County, OR
Wed Sep 9, 2009
Suzette

I have no problem with discussions about Dual Agency and my comments at Trulia show that and my interest in the public becoming informed.

I can't help but think you have not read the discussion here or you would know this was not about the things you have mentioned.

I did look at this.....http://activerain.com/worldwesteba and see you are an Exclusive Buyers Agent.

What happened here was not in any way the right thing to do Professionally and to be quit honest I am completely stunned you would suggest it was.....Guess we just disagree

See you around the Forum, start a Dual Agency discussion thread..it's easy, no need to dig up old questions to discuss it.

BTW, I have not participated in the Dual agency discussion but on several occasions mentioned I have not gone that route always used a buyers agent.....I'm not for it or against it.........

Looking forward to seeing your dual-agency discussion....Dunes
0 votes
Suzette West, , Port Orchard, WA
Wed Sep 9, 2009
Dunes,

As old as this question may be, there are people still out there who are new to the topic of dual agency. For that reason, this topic and thread remains relevant regardless of how far back it goes. There is a need to educate the public about dual agency and discussions like this one helps to accomplish the goal of spreading awareness to the public. It is the right thing to do, professionally speaking.
0 votes
Mr.P, , Arizona
Tue Sep 8, 2009
Actually ,I do agree with you Dunes, and appreciate that you acknowledge my contributions here on Trulia.

My Personal experiences here on Trulia in the past month have been stranger than fiction. Since then I have only been reading and answering questions mostly in my area.

Maybe I need to get out more?
0 votes
Mr.P, , Arizona
Tue Sep 8, 2009
Pardon me,

I only came here because I received a Thumbs up notification, and "Ruthless" is a good friend whom has faded away in the Trulia abyss.

Answering New questions or old questions? is really not the question. Dual Agency is a great subject.

Looking back on my answer of 09/11/07
Yes it is a challenge, and I love the challenge, however now, today, I avoid it, just like I avoid shopping with my Wife.... I just can`t win. The market has changed, prices are everywhere, it is a different real estate world.


The bigger problem with answering old questions is Realtors who are new to Trulia, and there are a few top ranking people who have done this. They go all the way back to the first question, and answer 6000 (six thousand) questions just to receive a top ranking position.

It does make a difference in getting leads.

Trulia along time ago use to rank Realtors by "Best Answer" which has faded away or I just can`t find it anymore.

Now I am not saying that Renee is gaming the Trulia system.

However in the future we can expect to see more Realtors, hiring "Ghost posters" who`s only job is to move their Realtor up in the (Trulia, social media site)Rankings.

Rankings are important, all a poster has to do is "copy and paste"

"Great question, call me for the answer"

Personally I have considered this, however I know my local Realtor friends will loose all respect for me and "Crush me"...it would be well deserved.

This is business, and MOST consumers will know nothing expect, the top ranking position.

Just a thought.

Patrick
0 votes
Renee Porsia, Agent, Newtown, PA
Mon Sep 7, 2009
Hello Ruthless,

I just came upon your question and wanted to answer.

To answer your question, dual agency isn't supposed to favor the buyer or the seller. The Realtor actually is just supposed to sit on the fence and mediate which is why dual agency really isn't in anyone's best interest. Feel free to read my article at: http://exceptionmag.com/life/vocations/0001532/dual-agency-n…

The problem arises when Realtors do not even understand what exactly dual agency means and they do wind up favoring one over the other.

If you take negotiating away from a Realtor, really what good are we. As always home owners want to get the most for their properties and home buyers want to buy at the lowest price they can get and that is why you want your own Realtor working for you and only you so they can fight for you and look out for you.

My advice to you and to all home buyers and sellers is to stay away from dual agency at all costs.

Does this make sense?

Renee Porsia
Associate Broker
RE/MAX ACTION
(215) 669-0589 Direct
(215) 358-1100 Office Ask for Renee
http://www.reneeporsia.com
0 votes
Susan Hoffla…, Agent, Shoreview, MN
Thu Sep 11, 2008
OK, I'm very late on this topic, too. I am an Exclusive buyer agent in Minnesota. We have dual agency here. I guess I'm confused by some studies from NYU and Cornell that suggest that dual agency disclosure has not necessarily worked in favor of the buyer. It shows that price negotiations were better for the buyer prior to disclosure laws about dual agency than after. That could be because of the timing and market conditions of the studies. The studies also show that dual agency transactions have no significant impact on price or time frame of the transactions over designated agency or single agency representation. I believe in what I do for my buyer clients and I do like knowing that I fully represent always only one side of the transaction. And, I guess it's a testament to agents over all that entering in to a dual agency relationship does not automatically put the buyer and/or seller in jeopardy. And, that MOST agents are acting ethically. Good news, huh?
0 votes
Ekerry.com, , Wheaton-Glen Ellyn
Sat Mar 29, 2008
If they agree to a lower commission whe doing it that should take some of the pressure off them and you. You can save money as well.
0 votes
Ruthless, , 60558
Thu Sep 20, 2007
Congrats Zoraida on best answer. This was a really hard decision.
Ruth
0 votes
Carrie Crowe…, Agent, Southaven, MS
Tue Sep 11, 2007
Where in the world IS Ruth?
0 votes
Cathi Weaver, Agent, Chicago, IL
Mon Sep 10, 2007
Hi Ruth,

I personally will not be involved in a dual agency. I will refer the other party to another agent in my office. I feel that I would not be able to assist both as thoroughly if I have both as clients because of the fiduciary responsibility. So, if I know how much a buyer can spend and how far a seller can go down, I can't share that information and can't help shape either client's decision in the negotiating. That's one of the times they need me most and if I have to pull back, I feel I am not servicing them as I should for the money I am going to earn from it. My motto is "Your best interest is my first priority" so I choose not to do it.

Again, I did say I was speaking personally :).

Cathi Weaver
Web Reference:  http://www.cathiweaver.com
0 votes
Silvia Miceli, Agent, Toms River, NJ
Wed Sep 5, 2007
I started in Real Estate in New York. While dual agency is legal, the obligation started with the Seller. We had by law to disclose that we represented the Seller and if the Buyer was interested, we could by hired as a buyer's agent (under a buyer's agent agreement and with a % coming from the buyer). This made sence to me. Since the Broker's Fee/Commission came out of the Sale price and it was the Seller who originally contacts, interviews, and hires a Broker, it sounded right. As an agent, it is still your responsibility to disclose material defects to the buyer and act ethically. In New Jersey, if you are bringing the buyer to the table, you represent them. I can also understand why because someone has to look out for the buyer. I personally would rather represent one or the other but sometimes you happen to have the best buyer.
0 votes
Phillip Canu…, Agent, Newland, NC
Wed Sep 5, 2007
Dual agency is legal in NC, however I'm not sure how effective it is. We are taught to disclose, disclose, disclose, so in a way, we just serve as a messenger. Yes, in some ways we can "represent" the buyer or seller, and their interests, but then we have to ask ourselves what legal position that puts us in. I do like being part of both sides of the negotiation, it helps me better understand the whole real estate process and prepares me for future transactions.
0 votes
Pam Winterba…, Agent, Danville, VA
Wed Sep 5, 2007
Dual agency is legal here in California. Personally I do not care for it and very rarely put myself in that situation. I prefer to represent one party solely. I have in the past referred one of the parties out to another Realtor for representation. Dual agency is a delicate balancing act.
0 votes
Ruthless, , 60558
Tue Sep 4, 2007
Sylvia: I agree with you. It was an awesome compliment and if you trust the agent like a matchmaker, it works. But in theory, I think you are getting less for your money if the agent makes full commission. As Zoraida said if you get close to that magic number, trust is suspicious. Part of having strong negotiating power is more information that the other party has. Ideally, it should be a win-win situation but some people want to win and the other person loose. So if you have a better negotiator on your side, that agent earns more of his/her money. But if you have a win-win agent, are they saving or making you more money?
Just some thoughts,
Ruth
0 votes
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