Do buyers normally ask for a sellers personal property as part of the negotiation process?

Asked by Chris Cole, San Francisco, CA Thu Sep 13, 2007

I'm selling right now and had a bid come in lower then I am willing to go. So we have been countering back and forth. The last counter the buyer asks me to include for not additional money a number of things including my brand new $3K TV. The tv is not mounted to the wall or in anyway installed.
I found this rude and insulting.
Is this normal?

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39
Sylvia Barry,…, Agent, Marin, CA
Thu Sep 13, 2007
BEST ANSWER
BEST ANSWER
No, Cole, it is not normal to ask for a $3K TV, especially if it is not mounted to the wall.

I think the buyer is taking advantage of the buyers’ market and tries to ask for a lot more than people would normally do – yes, they want the moon now. However, please do keep the whole thing in perspective.

I know it could be insulting and could also hurt your feeling, but your goal right now is to sell your house and everything is secondary – of course, unless they ask for your mother’s jewlry or something like that.

Take a deep breath, step back, take a look at your house, how long it has been on the market, how much or little interest it has generated, how the local market is for your house, and what you want to get out from the sale – whether it’s a realistic goal or not.

Then take a look at the whole package this buyer has offered, yes, including that TV, and decide objectively whether this is a deal you want to take, or, if this is the deal you want to risk losing. Ask your Realtor about how he/she feels if the TV is a do or die issue, and decide if it’s a do or die issue for you.

This may sound harsh, but you have to treat the sale of the house as a business transaction, don’t let emotion get in the way, especially in this market (although San Francisco’s market is still very strong), and evaluate the offer from that angle.

Good Luck,
Sylvia -
3 votes
Tisza Major-…, Agent, Upland, CA
Fri Sep 14, 2007
Hi Cole,

To answer your question - they sure do ask, as for it being "normal", well, I think that depends upon who you ask and when you ask it. In the recent past when we were in a much stronger seller's market it was more unusual, but not unheard of. I have seen folks ask for everything from swing sets to pet dogs (no joke) as a "throw in" to make the deal work. Depending upon the value of the item - excluding the dog of course, because everyone knows that is not a "thing" but a family member, and depending upon the seller's need/desire to sell, these throw ins may make the difference between a deal that works and one that doesn't.

You are under no obligation to include any of your personal property that is not permanently affixed to the home in a deal. Built-in stove, yes, light fixtures (unless specifically excluded) yes, freestanding washer or television, no.

Try not to allow yourself to get insulted and remember that the buyer is trying to get the "best deal" they can just like you are. Perhaps you should instead congratulate yourself on your good taste since they seem to want not just your home, but also some of your personal items :-).

You can always refuse the offer; counter out the items that you are not willing to part with; or, depending upon your need to close this sale, choose to chalk the items up to the cost of doing business and take the transaction to close.

If you don't have to sell your home, or if you are willing to wait for what could be a significant amount of time to find another qualified buyer, then refuse the offer and hope to start the process with another better offer. Just ask your agent to amend your listing information on the contract to specifically exclude those items that you are not willing to negotiate. Light fixture in the dining room, maybe... Urn with Grandma's ashes in it, no possible way.

I wish you good luck in your transactions and hope that you are ultimately able to put together a deal that both you and your buyer will be able to be happy with.

Take care,

Tisza Major-Posner, Realtor, Keller Williams Professional Group (909) 837-8922
Web Reference:  http://Route66Living.com
3 votes
#1, , San Francisco Bay Area
Thu Sep 13, 2007
You sir, are one of the lucky ones... you received an offer on your home. Congratulations!

Give them the TV. If your agent is worth his or her salt, you will more than make it up on the other end when you buy. Three thousand bucks should not be a deal killer.

How much is it worth to you to get your home sold so you can capitalize on the incredible deals that are available on the market right now?

Don't take the buyers negotiation as rude or insulting... it is not the buyer's intent to insult you. If you don't ask... you don't get... and right now Buyer's are in the drivers seat. So let them be in the drivers seat... and give them the tv. Close your escrow.

Once it is closed, NOW you are in the drivers seat!!!

Of course you could always go back to where you were when you started and simply reject their offer.

Nothing gained... nothing lost.
3 votes
J Lo, Home Buyer, California Glory, Brentwood, CA
Sat Sep 15, 2007
CONGRAT COLE!
I am so proud of you for standing your ground! Not only because you sold your home but because you showed what every seller should: I'm not that desperate!!!

It is ultimately a win-win for all - you, the buyers, and even the neighborhood! I find that to be rewarding beyond the dollar sign - because you can walk away with your head held high and know that you did everyone a grand service!!

If it's okay with you I will be saving this thread as an example for others to benefit from! Again - thank you and Kudo's for letting us in on the outcome.

Best wishes to you in your new digs - I can't say it enough - CONGRATULATIONS!!!!
2 votes
J R, , New York, NY
Fri Sep 14, 2007
Michelle wrote:
Sorry, one more thing. I realize you're in counter situation now. Whatever you decide, ask your agent about including a phrase like, "Only the following items are included in this contract: x, y,z. Seller to provide no additional credits, repairs, items or adjustments."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
And. . . the famous closing statement: "If we include the TV, will you pay $X for house?"
2 votes
Bill Warren/…, , Mortgage Lending
Fri Sep 14, 2007
Yes people will ask for personal property. Hey, it never hurts to ask and it then is something they can negotiate with.

Note: if personal property is asked for or given on an Offer To Purchase / Sales Contract, the agreement must say that "There is no value given to the personal property".
2 votes
Paul Renton &…, , Atlanta, GA
Fri Sep 14, 2007
Cole,

I am seeing everything in the market from buyers right now so unfortunately your situation is not uncommon. Buyers are seeing crazy builder incentives and now think the can ask the same in Resale. The sad truth is they can ask for anything they want the real truth is you decide what they can have.
I agree with Sylvia, you have to decide what is bet for you and if the TV was a deal breaker is the TV orth the sale of your home. Lets be honest you most likely could get the same TV for much less with the way the TV market is right now or one better. The TV companies are lauching their new models for the football and holiday seasons so older models even 6 months old are droping in price. Guess what I want for Christmas?
So, Cole lerning to remove emmotion from the trnsaction is hard but necessary, i a buyers market most people have champagne tastes, coolade budget and a whole lot of cheek.
Web Reference:  http://www.TeamRenton.com
2 votes
Michelle Car…, Agent, Coppertino, AL
Thu Sep 13, 2007
"Typical" personal / negotiable property include washer, dryer, fridge. However, a few different factors may be at work here.

1) Are they first-time homebuyers? If so, they may have almost *no* furniture of their own, especially if they come from certain cultural backgrounds.

I sold a townhome to a family who'd saved the substantial $100K downpayment, but literally lived with only a TV on a TV tray, a table & chairs you wouldn't find at Salvation Army and only mattresses on the floor. This kind of buyer doesn't relax financially until they actually own a home (they're worried they won't have enough money)--THEN they may finally buy some furniture.

My sellers were surprised the buyers asked if the sellers planned to take or leave certain items (bookshelves, dressers, etc.) until I told them the buyers’ living situation. I explained they had no contractual obligation to give anything else to the Buyers beyond our original agreement (contingencies were already off) and could ask for any price they liked for certain items.
However, they decided to leave many things as goodwill, especially as the buyers were truly appreciative of the items given.
2) Are you as Sellers downsizing and/or moving far away? If so, Buyers may be thinking you don't want to pay to move furniture that doesn't fit--or would cost more to move safely than it's worth, and leaving things behind will help both of you.

3) Are you moving down to a condo/th and the buyer moving from an apt., condo or th? If so, they may be especially interested in you leaving lawn equipment, ladders, etc. It's not always greed, it's often about safety. They figure if you already own it, it must work well for the home, and better than if they go out and buy the wrong thing.

4) Does the agent or buyer come from a "continuing negotiations" culture--in many parts of the world, buyers and sellers will continue to ask for more all the way through closing--and beyond! If so, realize you can say no--and if this is accepted practice where they come from, they will not even realize they've offended you. In fact they will often be surprised to hear they hurt your feelings--it's just usual business practice and no reflection on you or how they feel about you. If so, they will also not be offended by you saying no or making a counter offer with a price.

5) OK, sometimes it IS a negotiating game; "Let's ask for these 5 things and if they give us these 2 that's more than the 1 we hoped for." Unless you have outstanding contingencies at risk, answer pleasantly and firmly, "We plan to keep to the terms of our contract as we've all agreed to in writing."
2 votes
Mr.P, , Arizona
Thu Sep 13, 2007
Cole is anything really normal.
No that is rude and insulting. I would be very embarrassed to be that buyers agent.
I guess your are lucky he didn`t ask for the cat or dog.
If personal property is not attached, its not in the sale.
Again no it is not normal, however I would venture to say that it happens at least 5% of the time.
Good Luck
Keep Me posted.
2 votes
Tman, , 30642
Mon Jan 14, 2008
Good morning Cole,

It's common, very common ... refrigerators, washers and dryers, dishwashers, chirping birds, cars in the garage, golf clubs, Christmas tree's, custom furniture ... you name it, I've heard it all.

It's a TV, not a Baume Mercier ... sounds like you won the battle, but lost the war .... was a realtor working this with you.?

Never ever get caught up in the emotion of it ... like my great Grand Daddy used to say: "emotion is the cancer of the negotiations "

Food for thought ...

The buyer might be hearing $3,000 but they're basing their bid on that $899 "1080 42incher" flat screen they saw at WalMart last Tuesday night ... so in "their mind" they're thinking you guys are only $700/$800 apart ...

Next time take their offer, minus that "$3,000 TV" you can't live without, and offer them that "$899 TV" that they can't live without ... by this time, you could have spent a month down in Costa Rica and now be getting ready for the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic .l.o.l...


Good luck.!
1 vote
Chris Cole, Agent, San Francisco, CA
Mon Jan 14, 2008
Fast forward 3 months....
Took the place off the market, most buyers seemed to have no intention of buying then anyway just out kicking tires. Waiting to see if prices would keep coming down. Plus it exhausting being a seller and having your place in "show" condition everyday for months, especially when you can't stop yourself, do I really need to clean every window everyday? God forbid I leave one glass in the sink, I would go home on lunch to put it in the dishwasher if there was a showing that night.. So I took some time, made some nice improvements to my place, and re-listed this week.
First open house was today, and we had by far the largest turn out ever, including several private tours the day before. Disclosure packets were requested....so wish me luck!
OH I ALMOST FORGOT: I took my TV and put it in storage.... LOL just in case.
1 vote
Jed Lane, Agent, Petaluma, CA
Thu Sep 20, 2007
A word of reminder to all: Never - Never - Never enter negotiation or inspections until escrow is open and money is deposited.
I made that mistake years ago when I was new and allowed inspections the day after ratification and before the check was deposited. Some issues came and the buyer openly discussed walking after the inspection. Definitely put me at a disadvantage. I was lucky I was working with a good agent on the other side that took control of her client and the deal went through, but I swore an oath to myself to never let that one happen again.
Web Reference:  http://www.jedlane.com
1 vote
Ruthless, , 60558
Wed Sep 19, 2007
Cole:
I am so sorry to hear this. Maybe your story will turn out as good as my friend. However, you probably want to delete your follow-up post that starts:

"Wow, first of all thank you so much for so many great answers. Many of you really nailed it on the head."

No need for potential buyers to read that. Of course, I think your closing comment should stay to, so I will repeat that for you:

" Thanks so much for eveyones advice, it really helped.
Except for you Ed, if you don't like a topic you don't need to respond or keep reading it. That's that beauty of a forum you can move on to a topic that does interest you."

Good luck! Maybe we can all help you out with National Open House Day.
Ruth
1 vote
Sylvia Barry,…, Agent, Marin, CA
Mon Sep 17, 2007
Wow, Ruth, Your first story had me worried there.. I love a Happy Ending, but did you have to put me through all that?

I hope the little pricesses like the songs you played on that piano, and what a lucky girl your mom was!
1 vote
Ruthless, , 60558
Mon Sep 17, 2007
Cole:
Congratulations! Thank you for updating us and awarding Sylvia Best Answer. I'm sorry I missed this the first time around. I hope I don't sound like a wet blanket with my next comment.

Your right, now you have to get through the next 10 days. I don't know what California's inspection clause is like, but your situation sounds exactly like what just happened to a friend. The buyers loved the home at any price and the father were being rude. Both sides had agents, but the father called my friend directly several times while I was there. His reasoning was that they were negotiating "personal" items and therefore should be able to talk directly to the owner. One of the personal items was a hand made quilt. They saw the sewing machine and several works in progress and the daughter really wanted one. "But while I have you on the phone, we want this this and this too." My friend called his agent and told him what was going on. A couple days later they finally had a contract at a low price with some of the extras. Then the inspection came. Here in IL the inspection clause is for material defects and safety issues only. You can no longer renegotiate credits for none mechanical items. If the home inspector tells you the house should have more insulation and that in three years you should replace the roof and these items will cost you $30,000, that is not grounds for a credit. So the inspector had a long, expensive laundry list of things the owners should consider doing but none affected the livability of the home. Because there were still contingencies, the father says, "If you don't give a $30,000 credit for the roof and insulation, we are walking away from the deal entirely." They ended up negotiating again. When the father wouldn't agree to a $7,000 credit because he was really looking for $15,000, my friend said, "Take a hike." He was so fed up he took the home off the market altogether. For the next two weeks, they said the daughter drove by every day. When they put the house back on the market two weeks later, the same people made the same original offer and my friend sold it to someone else for more money. So good luck!

My other stories: I asked for a piano with one home. It was by no means a deal breaker. It was an "as-is" estate sale and it wasn't an anything great piano. I think they were glad I asked for it.

My mom's only pet as a child was a dog that came with a farm they bought. The previous owners were moving out of state to an apartment. My grandparents had always said no to a dog but the seller said the dog stays with the house.

Good luck,
Ruth
1 vote
J Lo, Home Buyer, California Glory, Brentwood, CA
Fri Sep 14, 2007
Kudos Tisza:
You get hearty thumbs up for your synopsis - minus the dog - My Rufus & Bear are never part of the transaction.
1 vote
Deborah Madey, Agent, Brick, NJ
Fri Sep 14, 2007
Hi Cole,

Yes, if I were you, I would probably be offended. And, yes, more sellers would be offended than not.

It is unlikely that the buyers agent is the catalyst behind the negotiation strategy of asking for personal property. Also, lenders will take into account any personal property included in a contract when processing a loan, since the mortgage is based on real property value. If a TV is attached to wall, it is in everyone’s best interest to define that as an inclusion or exclusion. Since your TV is not attached, it is an unusual request. Maybe the buyers watch late night TV programs on how to buy real estate and learned it there...:)

While your response to the request is understandable, your goal is to sell your house.....for the highest price and best terms. If the inclusion of the TV nets you a better bottom line, then do it. Can you agree to include the TV, but in return gain a greater return value on your contract than 3K?

As aggravating as the approach or suggestion might be, stay focused on achieving your goal. Since you have “askers” make sure you don’t allow yourself to fall into a pattern of nibbling. Qualify the parameters before agreeing (through your agent). i.e. “Are there any other items or concerns that would prevent us from having a signed contract, other than “x”? If we agree to “x” then we have a deal?” The type of buyer that would ask for the personal item may also be the type of buyer who could return with “one more thing.” Not a reason to not make the sale, just be prepared.

Best of luck! Let us know what happens.

Deborah
1 vote
Jed Lane, Agent, Petaluma, CA
Fri Sep 14, 2007
Cole,
You've probably already moved on in this negotiation. I love the passion of these answers. It seems that you are not alone in feeling insulted. The reality of transactions between good agents is strong negation for their principals. We as agents act for you and the buyer. My advice and guidance is to always remember that "the power in negotiation is the ability to walk away from a deal, the skill is in never having to". In this situation the buyer feels he has the power and some of my associates acknowledge that by saying that "you’re lucky to have an offer". Our job is to keep the conversation going while it's understandable to be taken aback by some requests; it helps to be dispassionate and to put yourself in the other side’s place. Look at your own motivation to sell and go where you want to go. You can always buy a new TV if you get what you want or to go where you want to go.
One other point for all of us to remember is to reduce these situations from occurring by removing items that the seller doesn't want to have to negotiate over.
Jed Lane
Web Reference:  http://www.JedLane.com
1 vote
J Lo, Home Buyer, California Glory, Brentwood, CA
Fri Sep 14, 2007
I think your buyer is feeling empowered to ask for something like this because of the offerings coming out of the woodwork - mostly from builders.

In my state of Georgia - builders are actually finishing off whole basements (20-50k) as an incentive for the buyer. Before I left California - they were offering big screen t.v.'s and now I hear there are even offers of a H3 lease for a year!

Please - although I would be insulted - and I would be indignant; just give them your bottom line. Don't give up the tv - unless you know you can make a deal that will get you another (maybe better one).

But if you do decide to give them the t.v. - you will have the added bonus of selling your home.

While this decision is completely yours - as Patrick said - if I were the buyers agent - I would be a little embarassed as well. But this is a business deal and if we don't ask we won't get.... Much luck to you and I do hope it all ends well.

Please - keep us posted - we will all want to know how this one turns out!
1 vote
Ute Ferdig, Agent, Newcastle, CA
Thu Sep 13, 2007
Some buyers do, some don't. I typically see first time buyers asking for the washer and dryer, refrigerator and sometimes a buyer will ask or the spa and pool equipment. Everything's negotiable, but if a buyer asks for too many things, you run the risk of upsetting the seller. If they wanted to sell their personal property with the property, the listing detail would mention that it's included. Lenders will also not want to finance personal property items that's why it's important that the contract states that all personal property is sold without value and warranties. I try to discourage buyers from asking for a lot of personal property items. I once had a buyer who asked for a tractor and he asked me all kinds of question about the value of the tractor. I had to remind him that he was buying real estate, not a tractor. He still remembers my comment till today (6 years later) and we laugh about it.
Web Reference:  http://www.go2kw.com
1 vote
Carrie Crowe…, Agent, Southaven, MS
Thu Sep 13, 2007
Cole,
Quite often the refrigerator or washer and dryer, items such as that are negotiated with no value, usually not the tv unless it is mounted. Sometime the surround sound will stay as a negotiating item. You do not have to agree, and yes, I would probably be a little offended myself.
1 vote
Jed Lane, Agent, Petaluma, CA
Fri Aug 14, 2009
Hindsight isn't always 20/20. It is possible that the deal could have fallen apart back then but we should always remember that we can't control everything. The TV wasn't worth the 200K was it? But who knew the market would go so bad so fast.
No way to know in '07 what we know today. But good lesson that sometimes we should go with the bird in hand.

Thanks for coming back.
0 votes
Mike Lewis, Agent, San Diego, CA
Fri Aug 14, 2009
Cole, it does happen. Buyers will ask for things and many times sellers will give it to them because they want to sell their home. Sometimes the buyers can go overboard by asking for ridiculous things but because they sometimes get it the philosophy is if you don't ask you won’t know. Try not to be insulted they are just trying to get as much as they can if you don't want to give it up just say no. Sometimes buyers will ask for unrealistic things hoping you will say no and then they will cancel because they are looking for a way out.

Good Luck


http://www.dawnsellssandiego.com/
0 votes
Fri Aug 14, 2009
Congrats on the sale Cole... http://www.gregorygarver.com
Web Reference:  http://www.gregorygarver.com
0 votes
Chris Cole, Agent, San Francisco, CA
Tue Aug 4, 2009
TWO YEARS LATER IT FINALLY SOLD!!!

Wooohooo! Closed escrow, moved out, done deal.

My agent has never worked so hard in his life he did a fantastic job, when buyers couldn't find financing he went out and got two lenders who would lend in my building.
Why the big delay, construction defects, negociations with builders, settlement, construction, inspection then finally back on the market. Sold for $200K less then my original offer in sept of 2007.
Guess I should have given them the TV.....
:)
0 votes
Ruthless, , 60558
Mon Jan 14, 2008
Cole:
It warms my heart to see your smile!!!

Good luck. It will be a lot easier this time because you and your home are refreshed. Last time was just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Sincerely,
Ruth

P.S.
I hope you don't mind the web reference.
0 votes
Ruthless, , 60558
Fri Dec 21, 2007
Cole:
How are things? Any hindsight is 20/20 comments? Please update us and read the posts associated with the linked one.
Ruth
PS the mentioned friends in the new post are different than the friends mentioned in your post.
0 votes
Deborah Madey, Agent, Brick, NJ
Wed Sep 19, 2007
Cole,
So sorry to hear about this. These types of early warning tales are often warning signs of things to come within the same contract. I am sorry to hear that the buyers traveled a route of additional difficulty. Good luck, you have some good advice from Mansur, Sylvia and Ruth. Know that not all buyers perform like this. May you find replacement buyers quickly, and a smooth transaction.
Deborah
0 votes
Rebecca Cham…, , Palos Verdes Estates, CA
Wed Sep 19, 2007
Hi Cole. The contract in California requires the deposit to be delivered within 72 hours of acceptance, so they are way over due. Most brokers require the deposit up front. I would never have opened escrow without a deposit. I hope it will work out for you and I hope the deposit is at least 3% if they do turn it in.
0 votes
Sylvia Barry,…, Agent, Marin, CA
Wed Sep 19, 2007
Yes, sorry, Cole, about the situation, unfortunately, market is tought now and a lot of txns are like roller coaster ride.

What a gorgeous place you have though. Since you are so close, maybe I will put that link on my site to help -.

I agree with Ruth, you should the posting on the details of your txn out as you have not closed on the contract yet and you might be looking for a new buyer....

Sylvia
0 votes
Chris Cole, Agent, San Francisco, CA
Wed Sep 19, 2007
Another chapter in the life of a seller unfolds, some of you already predicted this due to the buyers behavior but I didn't see this coming....
4 days after entering contract the buyers contractors inspection goes fantastic, the inspector had not a single warning. The couple was so excited according to my Realtor as they went through the inspection they were already decorating the place out loud. So I'm very excited that night until my agent calls at 10pm.
The buyer stills has not put his good faith deposit into escrow.
He called the other agent, she has been in the business 27 years and has never had a buyer act like this.
She does not know what to do. Seems dad maybe getting cold feet.
Were now at the close of day 5 since contract, no money in escrow,
So back on the market I go.... another open house this weekend.... I guess we file a notice to perform within 24 hours. I'll let you know what happens.
If anyone is interested in taking a look at the property I'm talking about just click the link below.
Yours truly,
Scared Seller
Web Reference:  http://www.potreroloft.com
0 votes
#1, , San Francisco Bay Area
Mon Sep 17, 2007
Cole,

Thanks for acknowledging me.

At least I know my opinion does not fall on deaf ears.
0 votes
Sylvia Barry,…, Agent, Marin, CA
Mon Sep 17, 2007
Hi Cole:

I am sorry that i missed your follow up response Saturday, but what a GREAT news!

Thank you so much for letting us know the background to your question and how it turned out. I am glad that we could help and that you have two good Realtors working on this and sounds like after some rough waters you are happy with the arrangement now. The best news for Realtors, BIG :-) !!!

Best of luck going forward, let us know when the escrow closes. You know we will be thinking of you! I wish you the best and that things will work out for you, not only this, but everything else in life also!

Best,
Sylvia
0 votes
J R, , New York, NY
Fri Sep 14, 2007
I believe personal property should be negotiated after contracts are signed, separately from the home. For exactly the reason you said! Because sellers may find it rude and insulting.
0 votes
Pam Winterba…, Agent, Danville, VA
Fri Sep 14, 2007
Yes, personal property can be negotiated. Usually it is the refrigerator, washer and dryer.

I advise clients, either buyer or seller they are purchasing the house and not personal property. Always make your best offer.

Sometimes clients get caught up in the small things if they not feeling good about the big things. Trying to make it a win-win for everyone.

When the offer comes in low many time the seller is insulted and then it is an uphill battle from there on out.
Web Reference:  http://pamwinterbauer.com
0 votes
Joy Liu, Agent, San Francisco, CA
Fri Sep 14, 2007
Hi Cole - I don't blame you for feeling insulted; especially since the offer came in under asking. Your home has great value to you and the person making an offer gave you an offer "under value" and then asked for more things on top of it during the counter period. You already started on a negative place.

As for weather or not this is normal, it's hard to say. Agents do their best to coach their Clients on what would be a good negotiations strategy. However it's up to our Clients as to how they take that advice.

I hope you were able to negotiate something that you are both happy with. I'm curious to hear what you did in the end.

Cheers,
Joy
0 votes
Andrew Wetzel, Agent, Havertown, PA
Fri Sep 14, 2007
It is rude but I always tell my sellers to remember that selling Real Estate is a "business transaction" and I ask them to try to NOT get overly emotional (especially during any negotiation!) as emotion can get in the way of a deal. For example, when I take a listing I specifically discuss what is meant to be "included" (if the seller is willing to "include" something, I often suggest making it "negotiable" so that if the buyer does not want whatever it is, they do not have leverage to offer less than full price and justify doing so by telling us they don't want the "inclusion". Sometimes you can offer the "negotiable" item and get a higher offer), "negotiable" (ALWAYS assume that a buyer will ask for these to be included in their purchase price) and "excluded" (I have had a couple of agents try to "include" items we specificaly 'exclulded").

That being said, the agent must also remember that the focus is getting the best deal for their client and provide the best advice they can. Leave the emotion out of it!
0 votes
Rebecca Cham…, , Palos Verdes Estates, CA
Fri Sep 14, 2007
It's not unusual, however the lender will not finance those items, so the fact that they are including these things in a counter might put them in a sticky situation. Try to think of it as a buisness decision and not a personal one.
0 votes
Michelle Car…, Agent, Coppertino, AL
Thu Sep 13, 2007
Sorry, one more thing. I realize you're in counter situation now. Whatever you decide, ask your agent about including a phrase like, "Only the following items are included in this contract: x, y,z. Seller to provide no additional credits, repairs, items or adjustments."
0 votes
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