do hallways, closets, stairs count when calculating sq footage of a home?

Asked by Cdd, Pinehurst, NC Sun Jan 6, 2008

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11
Alan May, Agent, Evanston, IL
Sun Jan 6, 2008
[ By law, in Colorado the square footage must be disclosed and accurate. Most agents go by what is in the county record. ]

boy, if we were using the county record, here around Chicago, it would be anything but accurate.
3 votes
Dan Askins, , Pinehurst, NC
Wed Jan 30, 2008
CDD, In NC we are required to measure the house using the exterior measurements, which would take in all heated and cooled space. Stairs only count on one floor, however, not both. If you have any other questions, I live in Pinehurst. Please don't hesitate to call or email. I am a licensed NC Realtor with Fore Properties. Dan. 910-528-7003. Dan@DanAskins.com
Web Reference:  http://www.DanAskins.com
2 votes
Penny Parker, Agent, Phoenix, AZ
Sun Jan 6, 2008
In North Carolina, these areas are all counted as long as they are heated and permited.

Please call or email me if you have any more questions!
1 vote
Leilani Medl…, Agent, Southern Pines, NC
Sun Mar 30, 2014
Here In North Carolina, we are required to use the exterior measurements when calculating square footage, and yes, this would include hallways, closets, and stairs. If you have any other questions, please feel free to contact me at LeilaniMedlin@gmail.com. I am more than happy to help!
0 votes
Mortgage Svcs…, , Charlotte, NC
Mon Jan 7, 2008
Your best bet would be to talk to a licensed appraiser.
Web Reference:  http://www.ednailor.com
0 votes
Lorie Gould, Agent, Duluth, GA
Sun Jan 6, 2008
Ruth.. you are so right. Quoting square footage is a liability. It is against the law here for a real estate pro in Georgia to quote square footage because three appraisers can get three different measurements which led to arguments and lawsuits over a homes value. And Elv!s... you are so right. Tax/County records are the last place I trust for accuracy. There are so many human errors involved. I have seen homes on tax records show 500 square feet when it is 5500 hundred square feet... what a big difference. I like to go straight to Redlink...the appraisers report software to assist in pricing my listings.

As much as I would love to have square footage disclosed in Georgia as it would help when pricing a home and I would have to stop explaining to consumers why we cannot, I have to admit we do not have the arguments over price because square footage is a little off from what the buyer was told.

In Georgia, all heated and air conditioned spaces are counted as square footage...this includes two story rooms. Appraisers often time measure the exterior of a home to determine square footage... that would include closets and stairs.
0 votes
Lorie, you are so right about appraisers!! I can attest to that having just sold my own home that I now have 3 different square footage amounts on 3 separate appraisals!! And, FYI, in TN, if the sq. ft. difference is under 100 sq. ft., no change will be made to the appraisal.
Flag Mon Oct 1, 2012
Ruthless, , 60558
Sun Jan 6, 2008
No kidding Elvis!!! Tax records and accurate sq ft are an oxymoron.

Cdd:
It's been a long time since I took my real estate test in NC and went through training at C21 or took a contractors course, but what I remember is avoid "quoting" sq ft because everyone measures differently. I gave Penny a TU because she is from NC and directly answered your question. I, however, try to answer more than just the question but get behind why you might be asking. Please, don't rely on "cost per sq ft" as a factor in determining price. Some spaces are more useful than others, some spaces are clearly counted as sq ft and others have gray areas. As Elvis suggested, it gives you a chance to compare on an even footing (ha ha, sq ft, houses, footing - I love puns). A 5'x10' walk in closet is only 50 sq ft but means a lot. A three story 5'x10' foyer is 50 sq ft but another home might have a single story foyer and the 2nd and 3rd floor has usable 50 sq ft space each. Which is more important to you? The visual impact and flow, or the additional 100 sq ft even if it is awkward semi-unusable space? When comparing sq ft from one home to another, use a range. Consider a 1800 sq ft house and 2000 sq ft home the same. Consider a 2000 sq ft home and 2200 sq ft home the same. When comparing the 1800 to the 2200, choose which one you like the best and then adjust your offer based on paying a little more for the larger and a little less for the smaller if all other things are equal.

I hope this helps.
Ruth
Web Reference:  http://www.Oak-Park-IL.com
0 votes
Pam Winterba…, Agent, Danville, VA
Sun Jan 6, 2008
Since it is interior living space and part of the home it does count.
0 votes
Todd Norsted, Agent, Maple Grove, MN
Sun Jan 6, 2008
When calculating finished square feet of a home, yes. It does stand to reason, as they truly are finished square feet.
Web Reference:  http://www.toddnorsted.com
0 votes
Kent Palmer, , Denver, CO
Sun Jan 6, 2008
By law, in Colorado the square footage must be disclosed and accurate. Most agents go by what is in the county record. Typiccally the stairs are not included, but hallways and closets are included. Any usable space that is above ground can be quoted as square footage.
0 votes
Alan May, Agent, Evanston, IL
Sun Jan 6, 2008
yes, but it's difficult to add into the calculations, since most listings don't include measurements for hallways, closets or bathrooms.

I find, depending on the layout of the particular property, you can "guesstimate" the square footage, by adding up the existing rooms (measurements are typically known), and multiplying by 1.10% (smaller closets, baths & minimal hallways), to as high as 1.20% (some of those large bungalows with full house hallways, large closets and cavernous baths), and that will give you a decent frame of reference for your square footage.

And while, I know this doesn't give you actual footage, if you use the same parameters as you compare homes that don't list the s.f., you'll stay on even footing, from one house to the other.
0 votes
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