What should you be skeptical about when looking at model homes?

Asked by Trulia Charlotte, Charlotte, NC Fri Apr 19, 2013

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Sue, Home Buyer, Atlanta, GA
Fri Mar 27, 2015
Another thing, is don't get too attached with their model home. Because in most cases, when you do buy there are so many factors beyond you and your agent's controls.. Example: structural changes to electrical, design, optional plan, these are all planned much in advance by the project managers and the need to change will depend very much on what stage of the home when your contract is signed.

As the other poster said, the home is sold under builders interests, not the buyer at all. Therefore buyer needs to do their own due diligence, does the pricing make sense w standard home, if not walk away.,

What I learnt, the interior of the home is up to the mercy of builders, unless you sign way ahead during pre-selling and only saw the bare lands. The upgrades/layout is the secondary reason why you purchase..Having said that, therefore it's recommended to make sure the location, the neighborhood, the HOA are the best you want to live with years ahead.

Suzie
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Daniel Fisher, Agent, Charlotte, NC
Sat Apr 20, 2013
Good morning.
When visiting a model home, a potential buyer should be aware that everyone who works there represents the builder, not the buyer. It is best to go with a Buyer Agent Advocate for New Home Construction http://www.trulia.com/blog/dfisher/2011/09/buyer_agent_advoc…
Important things to understand are what is included in the base price, what features are upgrades, what are the average total upgrades are in the community and what are the cost of the upgrades in the model. If you appreciate an answer, please give thumbs up. For the most helpful answer, please say thanks with a best answer click.
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My NC Homes…, Agent, Chapel Hill, NC
Sat Apr 20, 2013
I find the use of the word skeptical a strange choice. The only thing to bear in mind when viewing model homes is that they are typically filled with every imaginable upgrade the builder offers. When touring a model home you need to ask what is standard and what items are upgrades and how much certain upgrades that you like cost.

I find the methods production builders use considerably more complicated than they need to be. Every buyer looking at new construction has one question, "How much" and typically it takes several weeks of going back and forth with the builder reps and meetings at their design center to get this answered which I find aggravating, and pathetically slow. Like people everywhere the only reason they do this is because this is how they have always done it, regardless of the fact that it's time consuming and turns many potential buyers off.
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dave, Agent, Charlotte, NC
Fri Apr 19, 2013
One thing that looking at new construction and model homes that most people do not understand is that the model has many of the top end options in them and are perfectly staged. Companies pay a lot of money to have professional stagers market the models to the best possible atmosphere and lifestyle.

In addition the builder tends to package the most popular options and a few major upgrades in the model home. So when you are looking at the house and you see the sign that says starting at $150,000 the model tends to be signifcantly more than that.... but most consumers do nt trealize it until they start putting options in and then they are already sold on the house and the neighborhood and want it.... So, either they ask for less options, come up with the money, or readjust the pricing or financing to make it fit.

if they had gone into the model with a Realtor they could have avoided this situation from the onset and made a descsion that was best suited for their needs. Even though that may not have been in that neighborhood....

Dave diCecco
Realtor/Broker
Coldwell Banker United
Cell:704-519-7895
ddicecco@cbunited.com
http://www.davedicecco.com
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