I would like to find a buyer's agent who will rebate 50% of his commision.

Asked by Carm, Colorado Springs, CO Tue Mar 20, 2012

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59
Pamela Weath…, Agent, Colorado Springs, CO
Tue Mar 20, 2012
Would you be willing to spilt your income 50% with me?
6 votes
That is why it is so important to interview more than one Realtor. Due diligence is important when doing business with any professional. I'm sorry if you've had poor experiences with past agents. In the future, there are some excellent resources found online that can guide you in finding an agent that will restore your faith in us.
Flag Fri Jun 10, 2016
But a lot of agents do nothing. The agents i have found so far have been greedy , just trying to rush a deal instead of helping negotiate. I am sure i am not the only one.
Flag Tue Mar 29, 2016
Right??? LOL
Flag Mon Mar 11, 2013
Valerie Klei…, Agent, Greenwood Village, CO
Wed Mar 21, 2012
No need to be rude folks! Like Darrell, I offer a military rebate based on a sliding scale dependent on the purchase price. To my fellow agents, lest we forget that without customers we are nothing but a name with a lot of expensive initials behind it.
Kind regards to all.
Valerie
5 votes
Mack McCoy, Agent, Seattle, WA
Tue Mar 20, 2012
I would like to find a client who will pay 50% more than the going rate for commissions.
4 votes
Then I guess all of my Money is going to the Seller's agent. Why do I need you? I've done all the hard work. You're pushing paper.
Flag Thu May 7, 2015
Sean Dougher…, Agent, Fort Collins, CO
Tue Mar 20, 2012
Obviously you aren't too serious about this, and just wanted to get the agents on Trulia riled up.

In many ways, I agree with all the answers below, and I also know that, if you are serious, you will find flaws with every reason why we, as professionals, would not do this, so I'm not going to tell you why I wouldn't do this.

I will tell you why certain agents will do this, though. There are agents out there who are not that good in real estate, and as such, do not do much business. These are the agents that are literally working another job to be able to support their real estate "habit." These are also the agents who are unable to take any educational classes but the bare minimum, as they cannot afford those "extravagances."

So this is the type of agent that you will attract, one who isn't good at what they do, and can't afford to educate themselves to be good at what they do. So, that being said, I wish you the best of luck with your search, as this agent who will end up helping you may very well cost you a ton of money, by helping you to buy either an overpriced home, a home needing extensive repairs, or a home that will go down in value due to outside influences (new highway going in, or some sort of business that you don't want being built nearby, etc.) that any full-time, aware agent would already know about.

I wish you the best of luck in your search, and hope that you don't get in too much trouble in your purchase with the inexperienced, or bad, agent. I know that I can speak for everyone on here in saying that none of us need to work with someone who is obviously difficult, and that's because we have other clients who want to work with us, and not take away our income with inane requests. If you can't afford a home, please do not ask me to "help" you to afford it, using my money, that will be feeding my family.

Lastly, I would love to be a bug on the wall in an attorney's office when you ask him/her to cut his/her fees by 50% - the laughfest would be hilarious. Or when you ask the plumber to come in and stop the gushing leak, then, before he begins working on it, you ask him to cut his fees by 50% - it would be great to watch him, in his waders, watch your home flood. Or how about the firefighters, who, when told that you wanted to short your property taxes by 50%, thereby taking away much of their funding, watch your home burn to the ground.

Yes, I'm sarcastic, but the question you ask cuts to the bone. We work very hard to earn our money, and you have some gall to ask us to give some of it to you. Good luck in your search - we might be willing to give you some advice when you come back on this forum because your agent either doesn't have a clue as to what he/she is doing, or has failed miserably negotiating a home purchase for you.
4 votes
Pure hogwash. Let me try a spin of your own analogy on you. How many lawyers, doctors, plumbers, or electricians ask to see your W2 or check the appraised value of your home before they will provide you a quote for their service? Why should brokers get 6% across the board, regardless of the homes value? I offer a decreasing percentage based on sales price, reducing the commission expense on high dollar homes dramatically. Seems fair to me. Ask yourself what justification this industry has for clinging to the same 6% standard after decades of advances in technology that now bring a virtual home search right to the consumer?
Flag Sat Jan 17, 2015
Debra (Debbi…, Agent, Livingston, NJ
Sun Apr 1, 2012
and I'd like to get back into my size 8 jeans!

ahhhhhhh, if only..........

:)

good luck!
3 votes
Marie Souza…, Agent, Centerville, MA
Wed Mar 21, 2012
Why not look for the agent who will give it all back to you?
3 votes
John Schinkel, Agent, Colorado, CO
Mon Jul 9, 2012
I would be cautious about entering into a contractual obligation with a broker willing to arbitrarily forfeit half of his commission to you. Realtors work hard for their commissions and the good ones easily earn every penny throughout the course of a typical transaction. I am not saying there are no good realtors around that would do this. I can only speak for myself when I say I bring too much to the table to consider working for half price.
2 votes
Ron Thomas, Agent, Fresno, CA
Sat Jun 30, 2012
Does this work with your Auto mechanic and your Attorney too?

As Dr, Phil would say; "Let us know how it works for you."
2 votes
Ron - great news - it does work for HVAC repair folks...had a problem with a rental when the AC went out, and my HVAC guy went out there and instead of paying him a $100/hr for 15 minutes of work, guess what...I didn't pay him a $100 but received a discount...why? Because I asked, LOL That's how that works my friend! I love Dr. Phil! Everything is negotiable, but you never know until you ask...
Flag Wed Aug 1, 2012
Good point! Not sure why everyone picks on the real estate agent :)))).
Flag Sat Jun 30, 2012
Elliott R. O…, Agent, McLean, VA
Wed May 23, 2012
Be prepared to get half the service, advice, attention, market information, negotiating experience and value.
2 votes
Suz A, Agent, Longmont, CO
Mon May 21, 2012
Discount agents have their niche in the marketplace. And buyers generally get what they pay for - in less service.

Big Fan isn't the first lawyer to take aim at real estate agents. I don't blame law students who might be speculating about what profession is next to join the doomed. It's a healthy thing for the lawyers these days because it keeps their mind off the shrinking number of jobs available in their profession. I've also heard it said that other jobs and professions like letter carriers, autoworkers and even university professors are similarly challenged. Some 30 percent of real estate agents leave the profession in any given year. But, I'm not worried about the full-service agent disappearing anytime soon. It's a lot of hard work and it is not always rewarded.

Agents have a role in the marketplace. The agent is not merely a toll collector, a clerk nor someone who runs down a lot information for consumers. My team devotes a lot of time to providing news and information links as well as answering questions here. When we're not doing that, we're getting listings ready to show, marketing and networking to find buyers and sellers. The main thrust of my argument is we devote a lot of time beyond individual transactions on activities that serve to augment the size of the market. Educating the public is important to our profession. Consumers read the national press, which is mostly unhelpful when it comes to market analysis for a home in a particular neighborhood. Consumers need guidance.

Like lawyers, many of us toil all day long and then find ourselves reading far into the night. Like other professionals, we're constantly running off to seminars and training courses.

I'm glad it was mentioned that commissions are paid by the seller. For those who are unaware of this ongoing debate. Some think real estate agents influence the price of a home by accepting payment for the job they do. They are mistaken. Commission paid to the buyer's agent does not add to the cost of a home. The cost comes out of what the seller takes away from his sale. I suppose you could argue that involving agents adds to the overall costs - maybe in some cosmic sense. On that point, I will add markets don't happen by accident. There are millions of people involved in bringing the buyer and seller together - some who are lawyers. What they bring to the equation is facilitation and order, to name two functions.

In a recent discussion that occurred at the Davinci Institute in Louisville, CO, a programmer predicted that software will not soon replace real estate agents. There are too many functions real estate agents perform. If a full-service agent won't negotiate on commission, then you have some options.

1) Do it yourself - if you have a lot of experience and don't mind all the work
2) Use a discount brokerage. It's bare bones agency.

For someone who wants to tap the expansive marketing my team does, call me and I'll go over all I'll be doing for you. Thanks for your question, Carm.

Regards,
Susan Alvarez
2 votes
Ron Thomas, Agent, Fresno, CA
Sun Apr 15, 2012
If someone came up to me and asked this question,

In the interest of being Christian and Professional,

I will just walk away.
2 votes
Oleg Polonsky, Agent, brooklyn, NY
Wed Mar 21, 2012
So, the only determinant of quality in an agent is whether he or she is willing to share commissions with you? All I can say is: good luck.
2 votes
Brian L. A.…, Agent, Colorado Springs, CO
Wed Mar 21, 2012
For many years I have offered my Heroes Rewards Program™ to honor the service of All Active Duty Military, Honorably Discharged Veterans, Active Sworn Law Enforcement Officers, Active Firefighters & EMT’s. http://www.brianwess.com/HeroesRewards

I've enjoyed reading some of the more playful and amusing responses below and after over 10 years in real estate I am in agreement with most of the folks below...I would enjoy seeing the reaction of your Auto Mechanic, Doctor, Dentist, Attorney, Plumber or CPA when you ask them the same thing.

I doubt you will find an educated, experienced and professional Realtor who values what they do so little...not to mention if they value what they do so little I wonder how much effort or ability they will bring to your transaction.
2 votes
Suz A, Agent, Longmont, CO
Wed Mar 21, 2012
Buyers have the best of all worlds in terms of market conditions. If you are still having difficulty finding something you can afford, you might lower your sights. Or, you can inquire with a discount brokerage.

If you are about to make multiple purchases or a single purchase over $1 million, we can talk along these lines. If not, my policy is firm. The answer to your question would be "no."

Thanks for your question.

SuZ
2 votes
James Gordon…, Agent, Hamilton, OH
Wed Mar 21, 2012
There used to be companies that did that. Everyone that did in my area is out of bussiness. Rebating 50% of your pay is not a sustainable bussiness model.


By the way I have a freind that is looking for employees that will give back 50% of their pay interested in an application?
2 votes
Matt Mansfie…, Agent, Lakewood, CO
Tue Mar 20, 2012
Are you a Realtor? Working with a buyers agent is free for the buyer so it is very rude to ask for free money. That is like me asking you to give me half your salary for a month. Any agent that does that is too desperate to be a good agent.
2 votes
All the money comes from the buyers
Flag Thu Jan 19, 2017
Charles D' A…, Agent, Colorado Springs, CO
Mon Jul 9, 2012
i agree with Sal below............
1 vote
Fred Strickr…, Agent, New Port Richey, FL
Sat Jun 30, 2012
One other item I would like to add is that rebates that are paid to a consumer as a result of a real estate transaction, at least in Florida, must be disclosed to all parties to the transaction, in the contract, and that includes the lender. Some loan programs only allow the buyer to receive a certain about of contributions.

Sincerely,

Fred Strickroot, Realtor®, MBA, CDPE
HomeNet
Florida Lic. Real Estate Brokerage
2154 Seven Springs Blvd, Suite 103
Trinity, FL 34655
1-888-864-2758
727-478-8997
homenetyouteam@homenet.us.com
http://www.homenetyouteam.com
1 vote
Bc, Renter, Chicago, IL
Sat May 26, 2012
I am about to start the process of buying a home, which will be a new process to me. I appreciate assistance and expertise and feel it's right to pay for it. I've also read a couple of books to save my agent from having to explain basic terms and concepts.

With respect to real estate commission rebates, I feel I follow the logic of the many passionate responses against rebates. But from a layperson's point of view, I have the following question:

Does it take more work to help a buyer purchase a $500,000 home versus a $200,000 home? If so, then I understand how commission rebates would be anathema. But, if it takes the same amount of work, then I'm not tracking...

Similarly, in response to the arguments below about whether you'd dare ask your lawyer for a 50% reduction in fees, I'd say I'd expect to pay 50% less for a particular task if that task takes 50% less time. I wouldn't ask for a reduction in fees unless it was based on something objective, e.g., billable hours.

Back to real estate: If I learn my neighbor's house is going to be for sale and I ask a real estate agent to write an offer for $200,000 which is accepted, isn't that a distinctly different amount of work for an agent than to service a client who sees 50 properties and then buys one for $200,000?
If the real estate agent earns the same commission in each scenario, it seems I'm subsidizing the second client, who required much more of the agent's time.
1 vote
In most transactions, the Seller pays the agent's commission and if you think the Seller is going to lower his asking price just because your agent is willing to take a hit on his commission, think again. Also, in my opinon, it does not matter if your agent is writing an offer for $60,000 or $500,000. The work is the same. Writing and having the offer accepted is only the beginning. Your agent will still need to deal with the home inspection and take care of any issues thi
Flag Sat Jul 21, 2012
Sal, Both Buyer And Seller, Colorado
Sat May 26, 2012
They are all over the place, you just need to ask the right questions. A friend of mine bought a new home and didn't need a buyer's agent but put their friend's name as their realtor and got a fruit basket in appreciation from their realtor. He then bought a new home when he found one he liked, looked for a different realtor and after closing received over $5,500 in cash from the realtor in appreciation for getting paid and doing nothing. Win/Win!
1 vote
I'm sure your friend was NOT given over $5,500 from the Realtor, as this is not 100% legal. I cannot give money as a referral fee to anyone but another licensed agent. If I pay someone for a service, then I also have to send them a 1099 so they report that income.

I love how people always have FRIENDS who have had these wonderful things happen to them.
Flag Wed May 30, 2012
IMO, he should have pushed for 100% and given the realtor a fruit basket for the second home he bought...just saying...
Flag Sat May 26, 2012
Greg, Home Owner, Marietta, GA
Wed May 2, 2012
Wow - some very interesting responses from some realtors that are trying to maintain a dated and lucrative business model called full-service realtors. Although there is nothing wrong with trying to perserve a way of making a living, the power of technology and the Internet will eventually prevail (or at least substantially change the way of doing business). Just ask the music industry, the publishing industry, traditional bookstores, librarians, Amazon, ebay, etc. For many years realtors fought to control the data, the infamous MLS listings, but eventually the Internet changed that and now MLS listing data is widely available for free. Sorry for the diatribe but here's my great personal experiance with a discount buyer's agent... In my opinion, full service realtors will be scarce in the next 5-10 years, and so-called discount buyer's agents with commission rebates will become the dominant business model.

I live in Marietta, Georgia (a large suburb of Atlanta), and about 3.5 years ago we wanted to trade up to a house with a basement in my same area where we had been living for about 7 years. I had been keeping an eye on the market and listings through Trulia, Zillow and the MLS system, as well as monitoring foreclosure notices published online every month in my county. My wife and I would attend open houses and do drive-bys on our own. I found a discount agent who established their fixed rate commission based on the amount of work they actually did - which was the number houses they personally showed to me. I found a bank-owned property that had been foreclosed and got my "discount" agent to show it to me (as a nice surprise, it was in perfect shape and had not been vandalized). She ran a comp report for me, gave me her opinions on the house and helped prepare the offer, along with my pre-approval financing letter I obtained from my own mtg. broker. After two rounds of offers and counter-offers, we landed on $365k. As an attorney, I probably could have done my own offers/contracts, but she could easily use the local realtor forms which are system-generated and customary in the area. She referred me to a good inspector and we proceeded to closing. My agent had done a total of maybe 2-3 hours total of work. Her pre-agreed fixed fee, based on showing one house, was $1K, and my buyer's rebate was over $8K. Believe me when I say this was a very fair deal for both of us. I later gave her the fixed fee "discount" listing on my other house at $1k also, which also turned out to be a fair deal, as it sold within a month. I have since referred her to many friends and am a huge fan of this approach, where the educated and informed buyer, using the power of technology and the internet, does much of the upfront work and brings in the professional to assist when needed.
And don't believe it for a minute when they say the seller pays for it, not the buyer, so not to worry... what a joke - of course it comes out of the total negotiated price and the Seller takes it into consideration when setting the selling price for the house. Who wouldn't want to receive many thousands of dollars in "free" money from the seller in the form of a cash rebate applied at closing...?
1 vote
Just curious if the rebate was disclosed to all parties of the transaction including the lender?
Flag Sat Jun 30, 2012
Kevin Olson,…, Agent, Colorado Springs, CO
Tue Apr 3, 2012
Carm,

For justification, are you expecting the full line of services that we offer others who agree we are worth the full commission?

There were over 700 licensed agents in our MLS that didn't sell a home last year. There could be a reason for that. Of the 2600 plus agents licensed in our area, who do you think is going to jump at the rebate idea because it's still a form of income?

Do you think someone with experience in selling homes and a proven track record is going to be able to do a better job making sure you are satisfied with a great deal, or someone that didn't sell anything last year?

I enjoy being the listing agent when the buyer has an inexperienced agent. The advantage goes to us and our client (the seller), every time.
1 vote
Marco Gomez &…, Agent, Jackson Heights, NY
Wed Mar 21, 2012
What exactly would you like to be "rebated" for? Making all the appointments to see the houses you want? Recommending yourself reputable loan officers, attorneys, insurance agents & Home inspectors? Or is it for ensuring that once you have an offer the contract is signed in a quick manner, so you don't lose out to another buyer? It seems to me that you just want to take advantage of someone new in the business and if that's the case you will regret it, because an experienced agent does much more than what they are compensated for. Good luck to you in finding that unwitting soul.
1 vote
Darrell Wass, Agent, Colorado Springs, CO
Wed Mar 21, 2012
Hi,
While I won't be able to offer a 50% rebate, I would be happy to offer my Military Rebate Program to you. For details, please visit: http://www.MyMilitaryRebate.com
Respectfully,
Darrell
1 vote
Alain Picard, Agent, Puyallup, WA
Tue Mar 20, 2012
All great answers here! If you need money that bad to be asking for part of a real estate agents commission you probably shouldn't be trying to buy a house right now. There are a lot of people losing their homes right now because they can't afford them and you don't need to add to it. You should probably start saving your money and buy house when you are financially ready to.
1 vote
Joseph Hasti…, Agent, Bayside, NY
Tue Mar 20, 2012
I'm not local to your area but I had to respond. Please let us all know when you find that person. I suspect your search will take a bit of time. I'll bet your credit is shot and you have no money as well. Good luck out there.
1 vote
Marie Sweetl…, Agent, Colorado Springs, CO
Tue Mar 20, 2012
LOL...lol...lol...lol...lol...lol...
1 vote
Paul, Both Buyer And Seller, 11968
Wed Aug 10, 2016
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0 votes
Troy Moss, Home Owner, Rancho Cucamonga, CA
Wed Aug 10, 2016
The Answer is YES, there are Buyer's Agents that will give you a 50% rebate!!! Here's one of them in Orange County (Placentia, CA). They serve LA, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino County!!!

http://www.wehelpubuy.com/

It's called "We Help U Buy" and the Agent has great Yelp Reviews too!!!
0 votes
Sepabuyer, Home Buyer, Landenberg, PA
Tue Apr 26, 2016
This is legal in some states, and there are multiple sites out there to help you find a rebating agent. For everyone who is saying why would any realtor do this... if you are doing most of the search on your own, and you don't have your own realtor showing you a bunch of places, it's perfectly reasonable to ask for a reduction. The realtor would do less work by not spending a dozen saturdays with you looking through potential homes. They would just show up when you finally found one and help with researching comps to make an offer, negotiating, and seeing the purchase through.

Some websites where you can find a rebating agent include hungryagents.com. Redfin realtors are also rebating agents. RebateAgents.net is another site, as is owners.com. There may be another site where you are assigned an agent, and your rebate is max 50% of the buyer's agent commission, and goes down depending on the number of properties your agent shows you. Something like, 1 house, 50% rebate, 5 houses 30% rebate, etc.

This makes sense. For those people saying "why don't you give me 50% of your salary?!" Well, if you cut the time it takes to do my job in half, I might agree to that. I know this is old, but I just felt like you didn't a good enough response, and the responses are littered by sarcasm from greedy agents.
0 votes
, ,
Mon Dec 22, 2014
Beware if you do this it can screw up your loan application if not disclosed up front and clearly written into the contract. Any rebates from Realtors are viewed as third party contributions to the buyers down payment (even if the cash is not directly applied to your down payment.) Disclose, disclose, disclose to your lender up front what you and your Realtor are doing and it must show on the settlement statement. Don't be surprised if the seller is not happy because its really the seller who is paying the Realtor. I also agree with those below who argue you really should not expect this, How about if the boss announced a new pay scale depending on what each employee had to accomplish that day and paid full pay for a complex work assignment and half pay for an easy work assignment? How would you and your co-workers like that?
0 votes
Thomas Schmi…, Agent, SEAL BEACH, CA
Sat Dec 13, 2014
Hey, maybe they have a Target or Walmart store were you live. Maybe you should go find an-ex agent that now works there that was in the RE bizz and gave away 50% of there hard earned commissions to a _______ like you...
If I hang out with you for 6 months, will you give me 50% of your paychecks?
0 votes
Tim Maitski, Agent, Atlanta, GA
Mon Dec 8, 2014
It's the same old scare tactics from agents. "You get what you pay for".

So when I get a great deal at Costco are you saying I'm getting shoddy merchandise? I get a better deal at Costco because they chose to structure their business in a way that allows them to offer great deals and still make a lot of money. I'm sure if you walked into a small boutique shop and asked for Costco pricing they couldn't match it and if they did they would eventually go out of business because they chose to structure their business differently. It's no different in real estate.

Why do some agents give so much money to their brokers, some as much as 50%, when there are
great brokers who charge very little?

It's up to the agent to decide how they chose to spend their time and money in their marketing efforts. Some spend tons of time and money selling the image while others choose to just offer a great deal to attract new business. Nothing wrong with either one.

If I put up a question here asking if any agent would pay me a 25% referral fee for a $500,000 home buyer moving to their town I'm sure I would get plenty of positive replies and probably no one would have anything negative to say. Why then is it so silly for a buyer to ask for the same thing?
0 votes
Steve Toohey, Agent, Colorado Springs, CO
Sun Nov 9, 2014
Yes, this is an old thread, but when I saw it I just had to comment.

I find it to be absolutely hilarious when brokers here say "you get what you pay for," or "we provide better service," etc. All REALTORS are held to certain standards and are required to complete continuing education. You can search out the bad ones fairly easily on the internet or with your state regulatory agency.

As far as the old pitch "we spend more on marketing..." Well, when was the last time you found a home in the newspaper or in a home mag? Fact is (and this will upset most brokers), marketing IS NOT so much for the client as it is to market the BROKER, and gain new clients. All those radio ads the high-rollers are putting out there... who pays for that? Obviously clients do through higher commissions. Most homes are found either here on Trulia, on Zillow, on the local MLS, or on Realtor.com. All decent brokers will be members of the MLS and that is where your home first enters the marketplace and is seen by buyers.

Lastly, the old school model is BROKEN. Why should a seller pay 6% to sell their $500K plus home for the same service and commitment from the broker as the person selling a $100K home? The work is the same, and YES, if you are an agent you owe your client THE SAME level of commitment, service, and professionalism (and all of the uniform duties), regardless of the homes price. To expand on a comment in this thread, when was the last time a plumber or electrician asked to see your tax return in order to decide how much to charge you for their service? Did they say, "for a poorly done job I will charge X, but for professional job I will charge Y?" ... of course not, reputations are at stake. Get a full service broker that is a member of the MLS. If they want to provide a listing discount, or a buyer rebate, that is between them and their client.
0 votes
Debra (Debbi…, Agent, Livingston, NJ
Mon Mar 11, 2013
OK, everyone....take a breath.....the poster, Carm, is long gone - this was asked a YEAR ago!
0 votes
B Alter, Agent, Walhalla, SC
Mon Mar 11, 2013
Cam:

50% of "HIS" commission? May I assume from the gender reference you believe only male realtors would be desperate or foolish enough to agree to this? We can start and end the answer to your question by stating that it is against the law in many states and at the very least unethical in those where it isn't a crime. Now if you would like to offer something in return, say the right for the buyer's agent to lease out the property you purchase for 50% of each year you own it and keep the net proceeds and everything is disclosed up front to all financially interested parties per local, state and federal laws, perhaps we can talk, lol.

Ben Alter
0 votes
Randy G Morl…, Agent, Colorado Springs, CO
Mon Mar 11, 2013
On the Sarcastic side I would like to find a car dealer that would pay for 50% of my car to,... that being stated:

1.) A agree,.. the Buyers Agent is not paid by the Buyer,.. therefor cannot refund back to the Buyer what the Buyer never paid for.

2.) For an agent to pay a Buyer 50% of the commission after closing, that Agent would likely be wearing an orange jumpsuit as it would violate Mortgage law as Fraud. An agent cannot appear to be paying any part of a Buyers or borrowers downpayment.

3.) The Broker would have to pay the tax on the 50% that they were "donating" to the Buyer and as a result would be required to provide the Buyer with a 1099 at the end of the year,.. what will the broker state the amount was for? Remember any falsification lands the broker in trouble.

I would also question the value of the agent that would do this. I have been known to get the parties to the closing table when no one else would have been able to,.. to do this I spend a great deal of time and effort,... and I am worth every penny of what I earn,.. and many times more than the listing agent is offering to pay.

The question itself leads me to wonder if Cam would accept employment with a company that offered to hire him/her if he/she would kick-back half of his/her wages to the manager of the company.
0 votes
Where do you think all the money comes from? It comes from the buyer.
Flag Thu Jan 19, 2017
Suz A, Agent, Longmont, CO
Thu Aug 2, 2012
Did you find your buyer's agent, Carm?

I don't blame you for trying, Carm. Times are tough.

Look at your question objectively. You don't say what you would do for a 50 percent rebate. So, essentially you offer to receive something for nothing.

There is tale of a Communist dairy that received successive awards (essentially pats on the back) for raising production levels without expending any money. Asked once more if the dairy could raise production, the director replied: "Yes, we can. But customers complain when we cut the milk with all that water."

Suz
0 votes
Lavonda Ball…, Agent, Peyton, CO
Wed Aug 1, 2012
Hi, can you guide me a little re the amount of purchase you intend?
0 votes
Sal, Both Buyer And Seller, Colorado
Mon Jul 9, 2012
C'mon folks, let's be intellectually honest, all things in business are subjective and all things in business are negotiable, please don't kid yourselves - you're answering this question way too seriously. Everyone who conducts business has a price and bottom line, and just because YOU as a "professional" don't do something that YOU believe is against what YOU would or wouldn't do, doesn't mean anyone else will or would do it. And yes, this works in ALL businesses whether auto mechanics, house painters, tax/divorce attorneys, landscapers, tax accountants, etc, etc ...Please live and let live without being so condescending, hypocritical, etc...who are you, President Obama and his administration, LOL? Life is too short to be ridiculous...have a great day!
0 votes
Fred Strickr…, Agent, New Port Richey, FL
Sat Jun 30, 2012
Carm,

Goodluck with that! HomeNet rebates $500 for purchases $70,000 and up. There is a tremendous amount of work that goes into each transaction regardless of sales price. Many real estate agents work under a principal broker that they have to pay a certain amount of their earned commission to cover costs of the brokerage to operate. Most homeowners who put their home on the market enjoy the benefits of having a trained professional screen prospective buyers before showings, handle the extensive marketing concerns, assist in the offer negotiation process, verify the financial worthiness of a prospective buyer, and manage the intricacies involved in getting to a successful closing. This is why most homes on the market in the U.S. are listed with a real estate brokerage firm and put in the MLS offering a cooperating commission to the real estate agent who brings a buyer. A Buyer's Agent spends considerable time researching and showing homes. In this market, a Buyer's Agent may have to write several contracts before they are able to get one accepted. Once a contract is accepted, there are inspections, research on permits, regular contact with the mortgage and closing agent. Many homes are being offered as a short sale which requires a tremendous amount of follow up and follow through. With all this work to be done, and the majority of real estate agents being 100% commission paid, it is not likely that a buyer's agent is willing to, nor can afford to, offer a 50% rebate. Below is a a link to an excellent resource I found on ActiveRain which sums of all the functions a real estate agent performs. Best wishes.


Sincerely,

Fred Strickroot, Realtor®, MBA, CDPE
HomeNet
Florida Lic. Real Estate Brokerage
2154 Seven Springs Blvd, Suite 103
Trinity, FL 34655
1-888-864-2758
727-478-8997
homenetyouteam@homenet.us.com
http://www.homenetyouteam.com
0 votes
Juanita Simk…, Agent, Cimarron Hills, CO
Sat Jun 2, 2012
Why don't you just go to the seller and ask them to pay you to buy their home? Or, ask the buyer agent to write up a contract for you for a flat fee after you find the home that you want to buy yourself, and then you represent yourself for the remainder of the transaction? That would be a lot more simple than trying to make a buck off of the hard work of a buyer agent. Any Realtor who gives a rebate these days is certainly not serious about running a real estate business. I dare you to become a Realtor and find out...LOL!
0 votes
Mack McCoy, Agent, Seattle, WA
Sun May 27, 2012
So you're asking, shouldn't brokerages charge on a flat-fee basis instead of a commission / percentage basis.

There's a good argument for that, but the problem is - let's say the going rate for flat fee turns out to equal, say, a "normal" commission on a $500,000 house. The $300,000 home seller would essentially be paying 2/3s more than they would under the commission / percentage system. Or if the going rate equaled a "normal" commission on a $200,000 house, where would that leave the seller of a $60,000 house?

More to the point, sales and brokerage people are typically paid on a commission / percentage system. A wholesaler doesn't mark all items up by the same amount, they mark them up on a percentage basis. Auction houses do not work on a per-item flat-fee basis, they take a percentage of the take (from both the buyer and seller, I might add).

Of course, there are flat-fee services out there. For whatever reason, they have not taken hold in the marketplace.

My feeling is this: you may not get what you pay for, but you cannot hope to get more than you pay for. If you pay less, don't expect to get get more.
0 votes
allan erps,A…, Agent, Pearl River, NY
Sat May 26, 2012
Going to ask my Attorney to get my parking ticket reduced to Manslaughter!
0 votes
Ron Thomas, Agent, Fresno, CA
Sat May 26, 2012
And I want to find a Mechanic who will work on my car for some eggs and cheese.

What do you do for a living, Carm, surely we can work something out.
0 votes
Suz A, Agent, Longmont, CO
Wed May 23, 2012
chanteusediva,
Like yourself, I run a business. In fact, my business has been built on the excellent service I provide and my firm provides. For clients who make multiple transactions, I will negotiate commission.

Helping buyers and sellers who are buying their dream home is the most enjoyable thing I do. I work hard to make the home buying and selling process as smooth as possible. I have background in construction. So, clients find my service very valuable. We also do a great deal of market research.

These things have value. I have a marketing director who assists with giving broad exposure to the homes I sell. Like other agents, we invest considerable amount of time in researching the market. Living here makes that easier. But we also toil well into the wee hours almost nightly studying what is happening in real estate. We pass this along to consumers.

It is great you are investing. Hats off to you, chanteusediva.

Try using your Googling skills to find this web site you mention. I've never come across anything like that. I wouldn't be interested.
0 votes
chanteusediva, Home Buyer, Jacksonville, FL
Tue May 22, 2012
A few years ago I found an agent from a website...you would explain your situation and they would "bid" on it and you could pick based on who offered you the biggest split/percentage. Unfortunately I can't remember where/how I found that. Does anyone know what that website is? Perhaps my situation is different because I am a licensed real estate agent in another state and I am looking to buy investment property for myself so it could lead to a lot of repeat business than just a typical buyer. Can anyone point me in the right direction?
0 votes
Janet Sorrell…, Agent, Cary, NC
Sun May 20, 2012
I would be glad to do that for you if you are willing to give me your salary for six months :)
0 votes
Charles D' A…, Agent, Colorado Springs, CO
Sat May 19, 2012
Im curious to know more about how this might work. Please contact me so we can chat and determine if this will or can be a win-win partnership.
0 votes
Nina Harris, Agent, Williston Park, NY
Sun Apr 15, 2012
You would be able to when we can find a buyer who is willing to rebate 50% of what we save him on the purchase of a home.
0 votes
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