I've heard the Maryvale and North Mountain areas in Phoenix are not desirable. True?

Asked by Evelyn, Phoenix, AZ Wed Apr 6, 2011

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Joseph Domino, Agent, Scottsdale, AZ
Tue Jan 21, 2014
BEST ANSWER
Joseph Domino, Agent, Scottsdale, AZ
As the others have stated it is all relative. In my opinion, the most desirable area of the Phoenix metro is on the side of Camelback Mountain in Paradise Valley. Unfortunately most people, myself included, cannot afford the $2 million + it takes to live there. So, we live in other areas that we can afford. First you need to know what you can afford. Then decide where you want to live based on a variety of factors that make the most sense for you.

One comment I will make about Phoenix is that you could have $50K homes on one side of a street and $1M homes on another so generalizing about areas is fruitless. This is why doing internet searches is so difficult. Add to that the "chaff" that gets dumped on the internet, like "don't live here" or "this is the best area"and you will get confused real fast. This is where having a good real estate agent working on your side really comes in handy. A good agent won't steer you, but if you tell them what you want they will find it for you. You can't use general terms like "good area", no one every asks, please find me a home in a "bad area".
0 votes
Jeanne Solet…, Home Buyer, Phoenix, AZ
Sun Jan 19, 2014
Maryvale in general is not desirable because of drugs and guns, but depends on your personal lifestyle. North Mountain has all which include Moon Valley, Sunnyslope. Again you have to decide be riding by. I personally, a single female, stay away from east of 19thAve/Peoria to 7th Ave & north of Dunlop. I have lived in townhouses at 7th Street/Peoria and very nice. 12th street south of dunlop is nice & stable older neighborhood.

I just purchased at Greenway & 30th Ave - GOOD & affordable. When getting into town do not go west of I-17 until north city of Glendale. Again depends on buyer's lifestyle and even nationality but any family with children I would stay away from Maryvale.

Big city, many choices, but keep resale in mind if buying.
0 votes
stevsand2000, Home Buyer, Buckeye, AZ
Sun Jun 30, 2013
Maryvale is not a good place. Cheap, ugly and crime ridden. BEWARE!
0 votes
John Baldovin, Agent, Avondale, AZ
Fri Jun 3, 2011
What can't a real estate agent discuss with a buyer? on the topics that are off-limits.
The Do-Not-Ask List

Household income: Wondering if a neighborhood is considered upscale? Don't bother asking your agent. Klein says he can't discuss economic class with prospective buyers.

But it's relatively easy to find demographic information online, including average household income for a particular area. At Neighborhood Scout, for example, you can get a description of a neighborhood's "look, feel and character" that includes information about residents' age, income level, ethnicity and other factors.

Schools: As with income level, sharing information about schools "might be perceived as steering someone into a certain neighborhood," says Klein. "However, as a Realtor I can direct people to sources of information about education in that area."

Here, too, the web offers prospective home buyers a wealth of information. Buyers can find useful school statistics, including enrollment, class size, and reading and math scores, at sites like School Matters and Great Schools.

Religion: The religious makeup of a neighborhood is another topic that's off-limits for real estate agents to discuss. If a buyer wants to find out about active religious communities in a particular neighborhood, Klein directs them to local houses of worship for information.

Crime statistics: Surely an agent can answer questions about local crime statistics, right? That's pretty public information. But it turns out that even this data is considered a sensitive topic under the Fair Housing Act.
Once again, buyers have to do their own research to find out if a certain neighborhood is considered safe. Homebuyers can find crime statistics online, including where sex offenders live, by logging onto Family Watchdog.

Klein also recommends that his clients pay a visit to the local police precinct and walk around the neighborhood to get a feel for it at during different times of the day.

Environmental concerns: A buyer would want to know if, say, a home is located near a Superfund site. In general, a real estate agent isn't going to be much help when it comes to neighborhood environmental issues. Buyers will need to figure this out on their own. One way is to visit the EPA's web site, which includes a database of environmental information, searchable by Zip code.

The one exception to this rule is if there is an environmental problem with a specific home. "If it pertains to that particular property, and it's something I have knowledge of, I am required to disclose that," Klein says.

So why use an agent if you have to do so much information-gathering yourself? An agent can show you homes, guide you through the buying process from start to finish and help you negotiate the best deals with sellers.
0 votes
Carmen Brode…, Agent, Scottsdale, AZ
Fri Jun 3, 2011
Definitely do some online research before purchasing in any area. It is important to be well informed before making a decision to buy.
0 votes
Carlos Ramir…, Agent, Mesa, AZ
Wed Apr 6, 2011
The answer to that question is very subjective, and unfortunately we are bound by law and the code of ethics not to "steer" any buyer towards any specific area.

Many agents will answer that question, but they will only be giving you their personal opinion, or it is very probable that they might just tell you about the areas they work - which might or might not fit your needs. That is one of the reasons why "steering" (and answering that question) is illegal.

I will advice you to work with an agent directly, tell him exactly what you are looking for in terms of location, property size, local amenities, etc... And he should be able to tell you which areas fit your criteria. But a good agent will never label an area as good or bad, or try to steer you to the area they prefer to work.

You are welcome to visit my website where I have an area with some useful links to websites that will provide you with crime data, traffic info, school rankings, etc...

Good luck!
Carlos J. Ramírez, PC, ABR, CNE
RealtorCarlos@gmail.com
Associate Broker/Realtor, HomeSmart -
http://www.SmartAZRealty.com
=========================================================================
0 votes
John Baldovin, Agent, Avondale, AZ
Wed Apr 6, 2011
The Do-Not-Ask List

Household income: Wondering if a neighborhood is considered upscale? Don't bother asking your agent. Klein says he can't discuss economic class with prospective buyers.

But it's relatively easy to find demographic information online, including average household income for a particular area. At Neighborhood Scout, for example, you can get a description of a neighborhood's "look, feel and character" that includes information about residents' age, income level, ethnicity and other factors.

Schools: As with income level, sharing information about schools "might be perceived as steering someone into a certain neighborhood," says Klein. "However, as a Realtor I can direct people to sources of information about education in that area."

Here, too, the web offers prospective home buyers a wealth of information. Buyers can find useful school statistics, including enrollment, class size, and reading and math scores, at sites like School Matters and Great Schools.

Religion: The religious makeup of a neighborhood is another topic that's off-limits for real estate agents to discuss. If a buyer wants to find out about active religious communities in a particular neighborhood, Klein directs them to local houses of worship for information.

Crime statistics: Surely an agent can answer questions about local crime statistics, right? That's pretty public information. But it turns out that even this data is considered a sensitive topic under the Fair Housing Act.
Once again, buyers have to do their own research to find out if a certain neighborhood is considered safe. Homebuyers can find crime statistics online, including where sex offenders live, by logging onto Family Watchdog.

Klein also recommends that his clients pay a visit to the local police precinct and walk around the neighborhood to get a feel for it at during different times of the day.

Environmental concerns: A buyer would want to know if, say, a home is located near a Superfund site. In general, a real estate agent isn't going to be much help when it comes to neighborhood environmental issues. Buyers will need to figure this out on their own. One way is to visit the EPA's web site, which includes a database of environmental information, searchable by Zip code.

The one exception to this rule is if there is an environmental problem with a specific home. "If it pertains to that particular property, and it's something I have knowledge of, I am required to disclose that," Klein says.

So why use an agent if you have to do so much information-gathering yourself? An agent can show you homes, guide you through the buying process from start to finish and help you negotiate the best deals with sellers.
0 votes
The Urban Te…, Agent, Phoenix, AZ
Wed Apr 6, 2011
Evelyn,

Desire is a subjective emotion. What one sees as treasure another may see as trash. All that is the polite way of saying I am prohibited by fair housing laws to answer your question and even without such rules I couldn't answer it for you... that is a question best explored and answered by you.

If crime is of concern, I've included a link to an article I wrote on using the Phoenix Crime Statistics web site: http://www.urbanlifeblog.com/2009/08/how-to-use-the-phoenix-…

I'd recommend you have a friend drive you around the areas you may be thinking of living and look at the neighborhoods yourself. You can call and talk to a neighborhood specialist with the police department or stop and talk to business owners in the area and get their feedback. With enough information you will be able to made your own judgments and they will be better than anything we could write here on Trulia.
0 votes
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