I know the only way to determine this is through an actual inspection, however, if a house is noticeably

Asked by Zan Terry, Arlington, TX Sun Aug 17, 2008

sloped in only a small part of the house, could it be something small and not foundation problems? This is a small part of the upstairs in a large home. The door to one of the rooms swings closed "with" the slope and the closet door hangs a little as well. These are the only spot where you can notice anything "abnormal" with the slope.

Help the community by answering this question:

+ web reference
Web reference:

Answers

9
Margaret T.…, Agent, Conroe, TX
Mon Sep 29, 2008
Zan,
This could also be a framing problem. The short cuts that are used today green wood is used in building and it pulls in different directions with the weight as it dries. Be careful who you call, the wrong foundation company will do some work there and fix this as well.
I would have a structural engineer look at it.
If this house is listed have and you purchase have your reg. inspection first then the structural inspection if the first inspector does not address this to your satisfaction. You may need a longer inspection period.
If the first inspector addresses this with no explanation you may be able to get the sellers to assist in the second inspection.
Margaret
0 votes
Bruce Lynn, Agent, Coppell, TX
Tue Aug 19, 2008
Seems a little strange. Could be lots of things. Sounds like foundation to me, but could be something different. One place to start is with foundation company instead of home inspector. Foundation companies will come out for free normally to give you an evaluation. If the foundation is more work or more problem than you want to tackle then maybe you can pass on the house before you spend inspection money. You can also have a structural engineer evaluate the house as well. You might start with them instead of the home inspector for the same reason. A structural engineer might charge $300 but that is perhaps better than spending $200-$300 on normal inspection having that inspector tell you to hire a structural engineer for another $300 only to tell you that there is a bad problem. It's unusual to start with the structural engineer first, but it might save you some money if you go that route. Due to all these inspection possibilities you want to make sure to try to get a longer option period than normal. Perhaps 10-14 days instead of 7.
Web Reference:  http://www.teamlynn.com
0 votes
Sj209, Both Buyer And Seller, California
Mon Aug 18, 2008
Sure sounds like a sinking foundation.
0 votes
T.E. & Naima…, Agent, Dallas, TX
Sun Aug 17, 2008
Zan,

Yes it could be settling on that side of the house or it could be a construction defect. What does your agent tell you? Have the sellers put anything in the seller's disclosure? You need to walk the outside perimeter and look for separation between the windows and brick and may be evidence of patching... Cracks can be covered up...

Who knows, they may have installed the doors wrong when they put in new carpeting... only an expert will be able to tell you.

Naima
Web Reference:  http://www.sumnerrealty.com
0 votes
Bill Eckler, Agent, Venice, FL
Sun Aug 17, 2008
Zan,
If it doesn't look right and it doesn't feel right.......it might be good to listen to your inner thoughts and have a professional look at it.

Good luck,
The "Eckler Team"
0 votes
Zan Terry, Home Buyer, Arlington, TX
Sun Aug 17, 2008
Thanks for your answers. The home was built in 1996 and there is only a "slope" on the second floor. I have not been able to see any cracks, either on the walls or bricks, during either visit to the house. The upstairs door simply swings closed when opened (this is "with" the slope) and there is a small tilt in the garage door which sits directly underneath the room on the second floor with the door closing.
0 votes
Josh Thomas, , Austin, TX
Sun Aug 17, 2008
I bought a home with similar issues once. Upon inspection, the inspector suggested that this was not necessarily a big deal. Especially on the second floor, which is technically less structurally sound than the first by design (no concrete slab). Older houses can "shift" or "settle" to varying degrees, but this does not mean foundation problems.

Following Leigh's comment, I would look more for cracks in the walls as a sign of foundation problems. But, please don't forget the first part of your question....the only way to know is to get a professional inspection. Good luck.
Web Reference:  http://www.dealoftheweek.org
0 votes
Leigh Bates,…, , Carrollton, TX
Sun Aug 17, 2008
In North Texas where settling is VERY common, you probably don't have an issue. You mention everything is on the 2nd floor, are there any stress cracks on the first floor around the windows and/or doors? You would most likely see this with any type of foundation problems. If this is a home that you are interested in purchasing, I would add a clause into the contract stating foundation repairs must be completed prior to closing.

If you would like a referral to a foundation company, I would be happy to provide that to you.
0 votes
Sj209, Both Buyer And Seller, California
Sun Aug 17, 2008
Depending on the age of the home and type of foundation, yes it could be something unrelated to the foundation but if the floor is sloped (try rolling a marble, ball or bearing) I would say there is a structural problem. If it is just a matter of doors, they may not have been framed properly but more likely the house has settled over the years. If the home has a raised foundation there may be a relatively easy fix but not so for a slab. Some important questions: Any cracks in the plaster/walls? Are vents and windows square and move easily? Is the roof sagging at all? Are the walls square? What is the groundwater level? Where does storm water go?
0 votes
Search Advice
Search
Ask our community a question
Home Buying in Grand Prairie Zip Codes

Email me when…

Learn more