I am a buyer and have given an offer on a property. I am wondering if I can now bring in a buyers agent. Please let me know.

Asked by Sabina, 11234 Fri Oct 23, 2009

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Helen, , 11217
Wed Nov 4, 2009
YES YOU MAY BRING IN AN AGENT AS A BUYER IF YOU AGREE WITH THE ASKING PRICE AMOUNT
YOU MAY HIRE A BUYERS AGENT TO REPRESENT YOU.AND TO SUBMIT YOUR OFFER. GENERALLY THE SELLER IS THE ONE TO RECEIVE AN OFFER

I AM AN AGENT, MY CONTACT # IS 646-257-7363 MY NAME IS HELEN GOLY
I WILL ASSIST YOU SHOULD YOU DECIDE TO MAKE A PURCHASE,,, PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CONTACT ME
0 votes
Rhonda Holt, Agent, New York, NY
Thu Oct 29, 2009
It's very important to reveal if you have an agent representing you up front to avoid a situation like this one. Assuming that you found this property on your own, the selling agent set up an appointment directly through you and showed you the property and took your offer then a buyers agent is usually out of the picture. Why? Because all the work has already been done to get you into the property and to get the offer. The buyers agent had nothing to do with you finding this property (assuming), you may have to work out a fee for the buyers agent if you want him or her to represent you further especially if the selling agent does not want to co-broke at this stage.

This is just my opinion as someone that has come across this several times. If the buyers agent is going to work with the buyer til closing and do negotiations, inspections, and also ommunicate with the buyers attorney, mortgage rep and myself then I am willing to give a percentage of my sale.

Rhonda Holt
Full Time Top Sales Agent
Co-ops and Home Sales
Weichert Realtors, H.P Greenfield
Brooklyn, NY
Cell: 646-72505941
Email: HelpMeRhonda1919@yahoo.com
Website: http://www.KandHhomes.com
Web Reference:  http://www.KandHhomes.com
0 votes
First Last, , 90002
Wed Oct 28, 2009
Usually buyers ask this because they really want the apartment in question and it suddenly occurs to them that if they had a pro doing the negotiations, they might be more likely to win.

In my opinion, that's not necessarily the case. For starters, not all brokers are particularly good at "the art of the deal." And the other responses here suggest the kinds of downsides you may be facing.

My advice would be to continue to go it alone. If you lose out on this apartment, then you might want to consider a buyer's broker. All firms that belong to the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY) co-operate with other brokers, and you'll find the REBNY logo on their websites or you can just ask.

Karla Harby
Vice President,
Licensed Real Estate Salesperson
CharlesRutenberg Realty
127 East 56th Street, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10022
(212) 688-1000 ext. 383
(917) 365-0876 cell and text messages
(212) 688-1919 fax
kharby@rutenbergrealtyny.com
http://www.rutenbergrealtyny.com/agent_details.aspx?agentid=51888
0 votes
Thomas J. R…, Agent, Bethpage, NY
Sat Oct 24, 2009
This would be closing the barn door after the horse is out. The main purpose of the buyer's agent is to represent you in a negotiation and to advise you on the offer price. Having made the offer, the agent will not have had the opportunity to advise you on your offering price or to represent you in the initial negotiating process. Having said that you should try to engage the agent to determine if your offer was in your interest.
0 votes
Barbara Ann…, Agent, Brooklyn, NY
Sat Oct 24, 2009
Until you sign the contract you have the right to bring in any agent you please. The sellers' agent is not likely to be too happy with this arrangement, however, and you should make sure that the listing broker does co-broke (many smaller ones don't). On the other hand, if the sellers' agent is a member of a reputable firm and truly has the clients' best interests at heart, you may succeed. But your best bet is to start looking with an agent; even if that person is not with you at open houses, you should still sign his/her name in as your broker so there are no surpises later.
0 votes
Pascual Paul…, Agent, Bronx, NY
Sat Oct 24, 2009
A Buyers agent represents your interest, and I would not 'Leave Home without One' Giving a offer to the listing agent who represents the Seller is like 'Sleeping with the Enemy'
Web Reference:  http://PaulMVPteam.com
0 votes
Mitchell Fel…, Agent, Brooklyn, NY
Fri Oct 23, 2009
Dear Sabina:

If you have an agent representing you, standard protocol is that should have been disclosed that to the listing agent prior to your viewing of the property. Bringing in another agent after the fact will open a can of worms.

As an example, does your agent expect to be paid a fee, and if so who would be paying that fee? The agent that showed you the property is probably assuming they will be the "selling" agent whether they represent you or not. Especially if the agent that showed you the house is not the actual listing agent. Even if it was the actual listing agent that showed you the house, they are assuming they will be credited with bringing you in as a buyer.

Bringing in a buyers agent after the fact can cause you to lose the deal too. If it is important to you to bring in your buyers agent after the fact then by all means do so, but be prepared, you may be paying your buyers agent their fee on top of all the other closing costs you will incur.

Sincerely,
Mitchell S. Feldman
Associate Broker/ Director of Sales
Madison Estates & Properties, Inc.
Office: (718) 645-1665
Email: MitchellSFeldman@aol.com
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