Data Accuracy: Whose job is it to verify the accuracy of the data on a listing on the MLS?

Asked by Manuel Brown, Chicago, IL Mon Dec 17, 2012

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16
Darrell Hess’ answer
Darrell Hess, Agent, Asheville, NC
Thu Dec 20, 2012
The broker of the company listing the property. Truthfully the listing agent should be entering all the information correctly to the best of their knowledge and check their data against references.
1 vote
Steve Quinta…, Agent, Albuquerque, NM
Wed Dec 19, 2012
BEST ANSWER
The broker entering the data is responsible for what gets put into the listing. Most MLS rules require accurate data and will ask for erroneous data to be corrected. Failure to correct data can result in a monetary fine or other corrective action.

Some MLSs have compliance departments, safe guards, data checkers, and over sight committees to encourage accurate data. Some brokers are careless about data accuracy. Professional brokers recognize that there is a lot of money on the table and that all data must be as accurate as humanely possible.

Please report inaccurate data to your local MLS and ask for corrective action. You will be doing everyone that follows you a favor.
0 votes
JIM Michaels, Agent, Chicago, IL
Mon Dec 17, 2012
Caveat emptor-on bottom of most mls sheets
INFORMATION NOT GUARANTEED, REQUEST ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FROM BROKER, INVESTIGATE ENVIRONMENTAL. USE DUE DILIGENCE.
1 vote
Kelly Huffst…, Agent, Wake Forest, NC
Mon Dec 17, 2012
The listing agent who inputs the data is responsible for verifying its accuracy. If you have any doubts as to the accuracy of the square footage and you want to verify before you make an offer, ask the listing agent to provide the measurements that were taken by said agent. Many listing agent in my area hire an appraiser to measure their listings an offer a footprint drawing to ensure accuracy. As for other details of the home, a good home inspector can and should help determine the age of structure and systems as well as the types of systems and materials (i.e. plastic pipes, slate shingles, hardboard siding, etc).
1 vote
Tom Leinbaugh…, Agent, Gainesville, FL
Mon Dec 17, 2012
Buyers should rely on independent professionals selected by them (or based on the recommendations of a real estate attorney) to verify all the information on a property before they close.

For example, an appraiser will directly measure a house to determine the living area and can research the year built. A house inspector can determine the age and condition of the systems in a house: heating & cooling, plumbing, wiring, roof system. A surveyor can determine the lot size and make sure there are no encroachments. A real estate attorney can determine the status of the title and make sure that there are no liens on the property.

The listing agent is mainly reporting the information given by the seller and what is shown on the public records. All the information on the listing needs to be independently verified by the buyer’s own professionals before the closing.
1 vote
David Hanna, Agent, Chicago, IL
Mon Dec 17, 2012
I would say it is everyone's. Intentionally misleading or false information is rare in the MLS. Input errors do occur, and if you see it, you can use the flagging system to alert MRED to the problem.
First and foremost the listing agent has a responsibility to ensure they are presenting accurate and up to date data.
With IDX feeds providing data to many 3rd party websites, MLS data accuracy is front and center as something MRED watches and polices closely.
1 vote
Evelyn S. Fr…, Agent, Chicago, IL
Thu Dec 20, 2012
Hello Manuel,

It is my opinion that the listing agent should enter as accurate information as available.
0 votes
Ivan Sagel, Agent, Chicago, IL
Wed Dec 19, 2012
Manuel,

The info is only as accurate as the person that entered it. It is the listing broker that is responsible and should be your point of contact for any questions.

All the best,

Ivan Sagel
312.515.7823
Ivan@atproperties.com
0 votes
John Potter, , Cook County, IL
Tue Dec 18, 2012
So if the MRED fines a broker for bad data, the broker can just refer to the disclaimer to dispute the fine?
0 votes
John Potter, , Cook County, IL
Mon Dec 17, 2012
A surveyor is the best for square footage usually ordered by the attorney or the seller may provide as long as it is current or with no major additions to square footage.
0 votes
John Potter, , Cook County, IL
Mon Dec 17, 2012
Broker and a good appraiser will.
0 votes
Matt Laricy, Agent, Chicago, IL
Mon Dec 17, 2012
The listing agent and the MLS verifies the data.
0 votes
Scott Godzyk, Agent, Manchester, NH
Mon Dec 17, 2012
Information is provided by the seller and from the listing agents investigation. it is then uploaded into MLS. Sites like this can then pick it up through a feed but only have room for so much so some may be left out. It is ultimately up to the buyer to verify all however the seller or the listing agent are accountable for any "untruths"
0 votes
Ron Thomas, Agent, Fresno, CA
Mon Dec 17, 2012
The BUYER is not buying the information on the MLS, nor on Trulia, or any other websource.
They are not buying PROMISES, nor OPINIONS, nor Word-of-Mouth:

The Buyers are buying a HOUSE and Property; and it is in their best interests to check everything out.
The old saw is about buying swamp land in Florida without seeing it.

Everyone who POSTS information, disclaims the source and accuracy; so anyone who buys, based on something printed somewhere, gets what they deserve.
0 votes
Bill J Delig…, Agent, Naperville, IL
Mon Dec 17, 2012
The Listing Agent should in good faith provide accurate information. If you see that there are inaccuracies this can be reported directly to the listing agent or if you prefer to your local board who upon investigation will force the Listing Agent to update the info.
0 votes
Joe Schiller, Agent, Chicago, IL
Mon Dec 17, 2012
the agent is responsible for data..with conditional accounability
0 votes
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