Can we post home inspection report online so that someone can use it?

Asked by Helpyou, 08625 Tue Jan 24, 2012

We have a home inspection report on a home we are not going to pursue. Can I post it online with any legal consequences? I want to be merely helpful to other buyers before wasting their money.

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11
Don Tepper’s answer
Don Tepper, Agent, Burke, VA
Tue Jan 24, 2012
To be absolutely sure, check with a lawyer. However . . .

You paid for the home inspection report, so (unless otherwise specified) it's yours to do with as you wish. I said "unless otherwise specified" because you need to make sure that the home inspector didn't retain some rights to his intellectual property.

Honestly, I haven't heard of that. But I'm also familiar with magazine publishing, where an editor will commission and pay for an article from a freelance writer. However, while the editor has the right to run the article in his/her magazine, the writer may have retained rights to it. A similar situation arises with photography. So--read the boilerplate language of the report to determine whether the inspector asserts any continuing rights regarding the document. If not, the document should be yours to do with as you please.

Hope that helps.
3 votes
Gina Chirico, Agent, Fairfield, NJ
Tue Jan 24, 2012
BEST ANSWER
Helpyou,

I can see that you are trying to be helpful to another homebuyer but this can also be viewed as a malicious attack against the seller. In the same token, each buyer is entitled to have a home inspection at their own expense. Why would they trust a document online that very well, could've been forged to a degree (not saying you would do that) but honestly you simply cannot trust everything you read online so why should a potential buyer trust this report of a stranger?

Again, I understand your intention but each buyer should hire their own inspector. Who knows - maybe your inspector missed something that another home inspector would find? Not to mention any legal laws you may or may not be breaking. You hired and paid your inspector to inspect a property and issue a report. His findings were provided to you as a result. He didn't provide his findings to be posted online somewhere in cyberspace. That can open him up for damages as well.

If this is really something you are considering you need to check with your lawyer and I honestly think you should check with your inspector too.
1 vote
Mack McCoy, Agent, Seattle, WA
Tue Jan 24, 2012
Realistically, they're never going to find it. Even if they did, they won't trust it. I say, recycle it and move on.
1 vote
MOST agents are abusive... period.

They do not want others to know what is happening to any home they can hide any fact on. Been there, done that, lost a home over lies realtors and mortgage lenders USE and ABUSE us with.
Flag Tue Jul 26, 2016
Bill Eckler, Agent, Venice, FL
Tue Jan 24, 2012
Help you,

There are two ways of viewing this.... one is that the home inspection document is a tool specifically for the use of the person that contracted for this service. Thus, you would not have to provide its information to anyone you did not wish to.

Is it possible that your intended act of kindness could be viewed by someone as an attack or attempt to down grade the property. As Dan says, it would be advisable to consult an attorney prior to taking any measure of this nature seriously.

Bill
1 vote
Kenneth Verb…, Agent, PRINCETON, NJ
Tue Jan 24, 2012
I wouldnt risk it. If there are things that are debateable you could open yourself up to litigation. Even if you win you lose when you go to court. The sellers and their agent must disclose known hidden defects or they run risks also.
1 vote
Wayne Odenbr…, Agent, Mountain Lakes, NJ
Tue Jan 24, 2012
I agree with Don. The Internet is a funny place. You have to be careful.
But if the House is now yours, and the Insector is OK with it, you should be OK

If the Inspector did a top notch job, he may find it helps his business, as well!
1 vote
Apparently N…, Home Buyer, New York, NY
Tue Jul 26, 2016
Here's the issue.

The seller should have to do the inspection, not the buyer.

We need to change the laws and make the homeowner a true partner in selling any home.
0 votes
Loukojak, Home Buyer, Trenton, NJ
Sat Jun 4, 2016
i wondered the same thing. Thank you for posting this question.
0 votes
Alan May, Agent, Evanston, IL
Wed Feb 8, 2012
Your motives appear to be pure, but they could easily be misconstrued by the seller, and you could find yourself in litigation quickly, if the seller finds that it ends up costing them a sale.

As they say, "no good deed goes unpunished".

Secondly, it's not likely to be useful, even if a potential buyer of that property should happen upon it, they're not going to use your report... they're still going to conduct their own inspection. So it's more likely that your good-will-gesture might actually harm you, without achieving the desired result.
0 votes
Jim Simms, Mortgage Broker Or Lender, Louisville, KY
Wed Feb 8, 2012
One man’s trash…. Email a copy to the listing agent if your intentions are pure, if you are being spiteful because you wasted money a better strategy might be a heart-to-heart chat with your Realtor. What goes around comes around, good luck,
0 votes
Jeanne Feeni…, Agent, Basking Ridge, NJ
Wed Feb 8, 2012
Agree with prior two posters - would suggest you focus your efforts on finding your home, and regard the investment in this inspection money well spent to help you make your decision. Recycle the report and move on.

Good luck to you,
Jeanne Feenick
Unwavering Commitment to Service, Unsurpassed Results
0 votes
Baloney. I know for a FACT that if you had the inspection report and a FAMILY member needed to see it, you would, as would MOST.

The home inspection is literally on the WRONG SIDE of the transaction and always HAS BEEN.

You can either WANT TO fix the system or you can be part of the abuses OF that system.
Flag Tue Jul 26, 2016
All responses are from agents... quite a representative perspective, indeed. Enjoy the closed nature of the business while it lasts, for it can't much longer. The internet won't stand for it.
Flag Mon Dec 21, 2015
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