Are well and/or septic inspections required to close escrow in San Diego County?

Asked by Gglenn, 91905 Tue Mar 1, 2011

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Amanda Mitch…, Agent, Santee, CA
Tue Mar 1, 2011
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If there is a septic tank or a well ALL lenders will require them, unless you are paying all cash (in that case there is no lender!)! These are most common in older areas of San Diego or the outskirts or rural areas like Crest, Alpine Boulevard, Lakeside etc! I can refer you to companies I have used on my deals in Boulevard if needed!
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Myersjulie31, Home Buyer, Blakeslee, PA
Mon Apr 20, 2015
For the most part, I believe that you will need to get a well inspection. It is important for the buyers to be sure that they are getting a home that has a good water and septic system. If you get the inspection done, it will probably help them feel more confident about buying the home. You definitely want to be sure that the inspection is well done, though, just to be sure that the buyers feel good about it. http://www.brewsterwelldrilling.com/en/mining-exploration.htm
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Gglenn, Home Buyer, 91905
Wed Mar 2, 2011
Thanks so much, all of you. I appreciate your insights.
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Diane Conaway, Agent, Escondido, CA
Tue Mar 1, 2011
They will be required by your lender if your Realtor writes them as a condition of the contract. On bank owned properties, the bank will typically not pay for either one. If the well is used only for irrigation, most buyers don't have them tested in North County. However, if it is the only source of water, you should test for potability as well as production. The test does not make sure there is proper separation of the well and septic as has been suggested. That was determined prior to either being installed. Since they haven't moved, they don't need to be remeasured. In regular sales, both are typically asked for and paid for by the seller, but that won't work for bank owned or even short sales. You can ask for it, but if another buyer doesn't ask for it, their offer may be chosen over yours. What did your Realtor advise you to do? They are in a better position to offer advise since they have more information of your particular circumstance. We can only offer general advise. Best of luck to you!
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Elisa Peskin, Agent, El Cajon, CA
Tue Mar 1, 2011
Gglenn,
Some interesting answers here.
The answer to your question may depend on the financing situation as several have stated.
These inspections are not required to close escrow unless the lender specifically requires them and who pays for them is negotiable. It all depends on how your contract is written
We seldom see vacant land with those improvements due to the cost of installation.
I hope this helps you
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Jerry Heard, Agent, San Diego, CA
Tue Mar 1, 2011
Gglenn
It depends on the lender and type of loan. However I would strongly recommend that you do get them both inspected. If either one is not working properly you could have an expensive repair. You also want to make sure that there is proper separation of the septic and the well.

Jerry Heard - Broker
DRE # 00648687
619-920-9796
0 votes
Gregory Brow…, Agent, San Diego, CA
Tue Mar 1, 2011
If your buying vacant land.....I would advise not to close escrow without them......ever. I also would highly recommend it for any other transaction. Its not a government requirement but may be a lender requirement. Just because its not required doesn't mean you should skip it.
0 votes
Joan Wilson, Agent, San Diego, CA
Tue Mar 1, 2011
You need to check with your lender. They may require one or both. If you are paying cash, no they are not required.

Let me know if I can help you in any way!


Joan Wilson (Realtor, SRES, Ecobroker, Certified REO and Short Sale/HAFA Specialist)


California Cool 4 Sale
Prudential California Realty
Direct Phone: 760-757-3468
Fax: 760-946-7894
JoanWilson@prusd.com
License # 01341483

Find your Dream Home:
http://JoanWilson.PrudentialCal.com
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