Question removed

Asked by Sal, California Thu Aug 23, 2007

This question was removed by its author.

Answers

14
Michelle Car…, Agent, Coppertino, AL
Thu Aug 23, 2007
I agree with the previous comments. Be aware that should the extra SF be just a mistake, IF it's an unpermitted addition or conversion there are 2 important consequences to consider before involving any government agencies for correcting it: 1) if there are conforming to current code, realize you will be taxed on the additional SF, and 2) IF those areas are not to code, the city can, at its discretion, force you incur the costs of bringing the areas up to current code OR take them down altogether.

A review of neighboring homes/ floor plans may yield helpful info: if 2500 is closer to the norm and 1770 is an anomaly, it may just be a mistake. However, it's unlikely that an agent would fail to notice the difference; it's more likely that the home was sold As Is at 1770 sf with the extra sf as "bonus" instead. Good luck.
3 votes
Carrie Crowe…, Agent, Southaven, MS
Fri Aug 24, 2007
I agree that your biggest 2 concerns, are does this meet code if it is an addition, and will your insurance cover the extra sq. ft. In my area homes are sold on a price per square foot. Are they done in your area? If so, how was the home priced, on the lower or the higher square footage? If it was price on the lower you may have gotten a good deal! One of the rules when pricing per square foot, is if it is not heated and cooled, or if it is not under the original roof line it will have an impact on your price per square foot figure!
Web Reference:  http://carriecrowell.com
2 votes
Yvonne Jaram…, Agent, Honolulu, HI
Fri Aug 24, 2007
This is an issue in Hawaii where the tax records and actual square footage don't match, very frequently, even when additions to sq footage are properly permitted. (actual is higher than assessors office) It generally does not affect appraisals for home purchases because the appraiser comes out and measures, and uses those figures. It sometimes does affect equity loans or refinances if the appraiser does not come out and measure. It also affects your taxes, making them lower if the square footage is under-represented. It would typically affect insurance coverage only if the homeowner gave the insurance company the old, smaller square footage and paid the premiums based on this amount. If you paid your insurance premium for the greater square footage that you stated, and have permits, appraisals, construction contracts or other records to prove the actual square footage, you should be in good shape for insurance purposes, as well. (But check with your insurance agent as to the specifics of your own policy and how this would apply to you.) Even so, it still would be wise to get these records updated, to help avoid unforseen problems with taxes, and the incorrect data also might be confusing to someone looking to buy your home.
2 votes
Sylvia Barry,…, Agent, Marin, CA
Fri Aug 24, 2007
Hi Sal:

I am in Novato, S.F. Northbay.. The sellers are required to get a city inspector to come out and do a resale inspection before their house goes on market. The inspector will make sure all additions and updates are up to code and have correct permit; but not the square footage. If not, usually the sellers will have to pay for the penalty (several times of regular permit) and bring the building to code. However, certain items become a negotiation point during inspection period (some can be negotiated; some are flat out seller responsibility).

So, in your case, you already own the house, and already passed the inspection period. If you want to fix the problem, you will probably need to get a surveyor to come out and do a survey (unless you can find the report in existence) you will need to go to the county assessor's office and have the record fixed. I would guess the assessed value of the house is probably pretty close to what the real value is as even though it's officially 1700 sf, the previous owner probably would have priced the house according to what the market value was for the house at the time. So, I guess there should not be a huge difference in the assessed value (hence the tax liability)

You probably want to have your Realtor explain in detail why it’s not a big deal to you and the Pros and Cons of reporting/correcting the record from your county’s point of view. If your realtor can’t do that, he/she should at least point out the correct resource for you to contact.

Best,
Sylvia
1 vote
Mr.P, , Arizona
Fri Aug 24, 2007
Sal
The whole thing sounds kind of fishy, or out of code. You just don`t get 730Sq ft. In Hindsight I would agree with Michelle. Call up your Home Inspector, he should be able to help.
1 vote
Ute Ferdig, Agent, Newcastle, CA
Thu Aug 23, 2007
You may want to correct this with the assessor's office so that when you sell the public records reflect the proper square footage. They'll send someone to your house to document this and then hopefully they'll correct the public records. What you should be concerned about is whether the additional square footage is due to an unpermitted addition. It's difficult for me to understand why this discrepancy was not addressed when you were in escrow. Somebody should have noticed that the house was over 700 sqft bigger than what the public records showed. How was the house advertised in the MLS?
Web Reference:  http://www.go2kw.com
1 vote
Carrie, Both Buyer And Seller, Say Cheese!
Tue Nov 20, 2007
My mother said, "Don't lie. But you don't have to spill your guts, either."

Waving this red flag in front of the assessor would trigger a new tax bill at the new size. OK? It may also mean ther is unpermitted work in your home. OK with that?

You know homes are sold by sqft out here, so you will probably benefit ?? when you sell.

Then do what you think is best.
0 votes
Alton Darty, , 72370
Wed Oct 31, 2007
In my area county appraisers are contractors, they measure the outside dimensions of the structure only. They do not attempt to determine the actual heated space, and often guess about attic space, etc. My home has 1900 sf, public record shows considerably more. My garage is oversized but the appraiser shows it as standard size with a heated room off the garage that isn't there. They also show a second floor as finished space, even though there is no finished space.
I did report this discrepency to the Taxing authority who reduced my property taxes without question, but my home is still listed as much larger than it is, with only a brief notation in the records to explain the problem.
Alton
Web Reference:  http://www.arinspections.com
0 votes
Rita Bradley, , Orange County, VT
Fri Aug 24, 2007
Wow, what a lot of excellent answers! I live in and appraise property in Orange County and you can't believe how often this happens. How did you find out the actual square footage? As was mentioned, there may have been an addition added. You can check with the Orange County Building and Safety office to see if it was a permitted (legal) addition. I'd be happy to check it out for you if you want to drop me a line with your address.

ritabradley01@yahoo.com
0 votes
Ruthless, , 60558
Fri Aug 24, 2007
I find this thread interesting because I wonder if people were asking this question before the existence of Zillow.com and Trulia's Find Homes data search. I've noticed that since the Zillow vs Trulia debate started and Zillow has been called out for inaccurate data, the presents and sort-ability based on sq ft has changed.
Ruth
Web Reference:  http://www.oak-park-il.com
0 votes
Pam Winterba…, Agent, Danville, VA
Fri Aug 24, 2007
I am wondering if there were any additions done the home?

I recently sold my home that the assessor has listed as 1450 square feet. The home was actually 2000 square feet, there were not additions to the home. It was a tri-level home and almost a floor of square footage was missing. It turned out they did had incorrect records for most of the cul de sac where I lived.
Web Reference:  http://pamwinterbauer.com
0 votes
Ruthless, , 60558
Fri Aug 24, 2007
I hadn't thought about the insurance replacement issue. You've been living there for a while now it sounds, so it's probably too late to go after the seller if problems arise from this discrepancy. So you need to be most concerned about Michelle's comments. You probably don't want to correct it.
Ruth
Web Reference:  http://www.oak-park-il.com
0 votes
Bruce Lynn, Agent, Coppell, TX
Thu Aug 23, 2007
What came out on the appraisal? That's a big difference and could affect the price of the house. It is possible there is a difference. It's not uncommon where I live, but not common it would be that much difference.
0 votes
Mr.P, , Arizona
Thu Aug 23, 2007
Well Sal
you are lucky the numbers are not reversed. 730 square feet is a lot to be missing. Sounds like a enclosed patio or a converted garage. You want to make sure that the 730 Square feet in question has Heat and A/C to be considered living space. You should be concerned about what is actual living space.
You want to change the tax records before you sell. You should also check your insurance. Will they only replace 1770 Square feet.
Good Luck
0 votes
Search Advice
Search
Ask our community a question
General Area in Popular Anaheim Neighborhoods

Email me when…

Learn more