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Forest Hills : Real Estate Advice

  • All76
  • Local Info10
  • Home Buying25
  • Home Selling5
  • Market Conditions5

Activity 59
Sun Oct 8, 2017
Abdur Rahman answered:
Sun Oct 1, 2017
Cheryl Rodrigues asked:
#C67 This listing is not off market, please could you correct this error.
112-20 72nd Drive #C67
$815,000 FOR SALE
5 rooms3 beds2 baths
Co-op in Forest Hills
0 votes 0 Answers Share Flag
Fri Sep 1, 2017
Gloria Fernandez asked:
Mon Jun 12, 2017
Jack4 answered:
Here is the correct answer. Nyc will require a permit for a conversion like that. If there was no permit and the work is done, then when the city learns of it, they will fine the current owner, either you or them, it doesn't matter who, it's the owner at time of discovery. This fine starts at 5000. You must pay that before the hearing or you will owe interest. Of not in original you lose that hearing period. Then you need to apply for permit which could cost a few hundred or 1k. Then you need to make sure the building is to code, if not more fines and a correction order. You then need to get a nys licensed architect and engineer to approve the work done or work to be done to correct whatever was done. This is why the bank won't finance the loan once discoverd. Correcting this could cost 30 plus thousand. I've seen as high as 45k for one of these. Also the owner who did the conversion probably didn't pay much as they got someone who was willing to NOT get the required permits and inspection for code violations by the city. This way he is able to charge a reasonable price and make a big profit. Unfortunately it's the owner who will pay tripple now. Only hope that it's an easy conversion as they left the garage door and didn't change structural walls. Buyer beware. Good luck. ... more
0 votes 9 answers Share Flag
Mon Mar 20, 2017
Keto8888 asked:
Wed Dec 14, 2016
Kathy Burgreen answered:
You need to know that realtors cannot answer your question because it violates Fair Housing laws. However, I'm a former realtor (no longer subject to Fair Housing laws) and knowledgeable with Forest Hills so my reply as follows:

Forest Hills as well as the rest of New York City is very walkable and public transportation is excellent. There are plenty of stores, restaurants, close to subway stops and plenty of kids. As for public schools, the New York City public school system sucks and needs a major overhaul. However, it will never happen as the city refuses to increase property taxes to pay for it and instead relies on income, sales and corporate taxes to pay for everything including public schools. Property taxes are really cheap in the city compared to the neighboring suburbs.
The public elementary schools in Forest Hills, Bayside and possibly Astoria and Elmont are good. After elementary school, students apply to different middle and senior high schools so it may not be in your immediate neighborhood. The major issue with the New York City public school system is:
1) the criteria and vetting process to select teachers is not as selective as what suburban teachers go thru. Also the salaries are lower than their suburban counterparts. Therefore, the quality of teachers is good but not top rated. I'm married to a retired NYC public high school teacher and we live in the suburbs so I saw the differences first hand.

2) Due to the ever increasing population and demographics, the quality of education is horrible because the city budget doesn't have the funding to provide everything needed for your children. Examples include:
Not enough classrooms (classes are taught in former closet space, auditioriums, gyms, cafeterias and other non class space).
No separate classes for art, gym, music, etc.
No field space for outdoor play or recess. Kids play on cement "fields".
Class sizes are large and over the maximum threshold for number of students registered per class.
Your child may be taught by a paraprofessional instead of the regular teacher.

3. The school buildings themselves are crumbling and not well maintained. Again, it's a budget issue. The buildings basically get the minimum maintenance required and nothing gets repaired until it falls on somebody's head.

Sorry to be blunt and give you a horror story as a parent, but my husband taught high school Math for 30 years and I had the opportunity to read the New York City teacher newspaper to find out what all the complaints were about. Unfortunately, the above is a summary of what I read over 30 years and it hasn't changed.

Since you are looking for a rental, you are doing the right thing (I strongly advise renting first before buying - even though I worked as a realtor). Since you will work in Manhattan, you need to skip the city and rent in the suburbs. Look at the following places for renting:

Westchester County - New Rochelle, Mamaroneck, Hastings on Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Tarrytown, White Plains and Hartsdale.
Nassau County - Franklin Square, Floral Park, New Hyde Park, Great Neck, Lake Success, Rockville Centre, Lynbrook, Uniondale, Port Washington, Freeport, etc.

All of the suburbs have excellent commuter rail lines that take you from the suburbs to Manhattan in 30 - 40 minutes. Go to www.mta.info (New York City transportation). Then click on "Long Island Railroad" which is the commuter rail system from Nassau County (Long Island) OR click on "MetroNorth" which is the commuter rail system from Westchester County. Warning: Most commuters take the railroad because driving into Manhattan during the rush hours will give you 10 headaches and a heart attack - don't even try it. Much better to get a seat on the train, open your laptop or newspaper & chill out.

Final Advice / tip: BEFORE you relocate & move here - make sure your income is at least $100,000. or higher. You can survive with an income of $75,000. but you will struggle with 2 kids. Below $75,000. and you will be on welfare. To live comfortably with 2 kids, you need an income of about $150,000. BEWARE: Cost of living and housing is VERY EXPENSIVE!!!
... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Mon Nov 21, 2016
Angelica P answered:
Hi,

To edit you rental resume, please follow these instructions:

1. Hover your mouse on your name at the upper right corner of the screen and click "Rental resume"
2. You will direct to the rental resume page where you can edit it.

For future reference, you can feel free to contact us about this type of inquiry through our contact form here:

http://www.trulia.com/help/ask/


Thank you for using Trulia!

Angelica
Consumer Care Advocate
... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Tue Sep 27, 2016
Filsaime.philippe answered:
How much will my closing cost be for coop I buy for $30,000 in Spring Valley New York?
0 votes 6 answers Share Flag
Thu Oct 22, 2015
Yanoska Diaz answered:
Did you try the "manage my profile" tab right below your photo on the top right corner of the page?
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Tue Jun 9, 2015
Jahir Sikdar answered:
Only 15 mnt from the F Train station which is located in 179 hillside ave.
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Thu May 21, 2015
Marco Gomez & The Reach Team answered:
The monthly cost for parking is between $170 & $220 Per month in Forest Hills.
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Mon Mar 23, 2015
UpNest Top Realtors answered:
Commission is always negotiable, and the Department of Justice even condones it as good competitive behavior among agents.

The typical commission is close to 6%, but that can really vary depending on the location and price of the home you're wanting to sell. Many agents are willing to be flexible on commission rates, but it's not something they like to advertise. And most clients are not very capable or comfortable negotiating rates.

At UpNest, http://www.upnest.com, we created an online marketplace where home sellers can confidentially submit their homes, and multiple top local agents will compete to obtain your listing. Some agents lower their commission rates to stand out, and every agent that submits a proposal is an experienced agent, so it's not the same as working with a low grade discount brokerage.

Hope that helps!
... more
0 votes 7 answers Share Flag
Thu Aug 14, 2014
Richard Lovell answered:
Once you find the home that you are looking to purchase and are ready to sign a Contract of Sale, yes you will need to make a down payment. This is usually 10 percent of the purchase price but can sometimes be a little less. If you need the money from the proceeds of the Co-op sale in order to make this down payment then you will have to sell first. Of course, you will need a place to live after you close on the apartment but before you can close on your new home purchase. ... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Thu May 15, 2014
Steve Hirsch- Best Broker answered:
You dont need reserves to look around but if you are looking for a coop, they require 20% down.
At closing the rule of thumb is to have 6 months to 1 years worth of mortgage and maintenance in your checking account. This should be what you have left after closing fees. I hope this helps you even if I am answering your question a bit late. ... more
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Tue Oct 29, 2013
Annette Lawrence answered:
Yes, I recently heard a citizen complain it hard to find a place to smoke!
No sympathy received.
-
If you are to be a pet owner, make sure you become a qualified single family home owner also.
Don't look for others to blame for the choices you make.
Yes, I know, that doggie is family too.
Sorry, it is not family, it's a doggie.
Time for a reality check.
... more
0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Tue Oct 29, 2013
Anu Dutta answered:
You can check Yelp, Google maps etc Also Hopstop is a good site to check about transportation.
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Fri Sep 27, 2013
Anu Dutta answered:
Its not exactly 2BR, one large BR and one smaller BR, you might want to check out physically and see if you like it or not.
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Tue Aug 20, 2013
answered:
Rent today; Buy tomorrow. How to convert from Tenant to Homeowner.

When I rented my first apartment in Astoria, I did not want to be a Tenant my whole life and pay my Landlordâ€s mortgage. I longed to become a Homeowner.

That’s why I found my way into the mortgage business in 1989 and soon afterward became a Homeowner. Here are the fundamentals any Tenant should know to prepare to become a Homeowner in the future, no matter when that might be.

• Credit: Establish 3 credit accounts, no more than 5. Pay your bills on time. Keep your balances to no more than 50% of your credit limit. Don’t pay off the accounts in full. Keep balances active for 12-24 months. All of the above will provide both a good credit score and adequate credit history to qualify for a mortgage loan.

• Assets: A basic savings budget isn’t hard to do. Pay your rent first in your budget; then set aside 10% of your income before taxes . Make it a budget priority and you’ll still have money left over for entertainment and restaurants and clothing.

How much money do you need to buy a home? Many buyers spend no more than $25,000 to buy their first homes. There are loan programs with low down payment requirements and many real estate agents negotiate for their Buyers a “Seller’s concession” to include the Buyer’s closing costs (which are HIGH here in New York!) in the price of the home.

• Income: Two years consistent income is the basic requirement for either a salaried individual or a self-employed person. Income from Bonus, Commission, and Overtime is treated differently and is best discussed with your Mortgage Banker.

• Market Survey: it doesn’t hurt to go out and get to know neighborhoods where you might like to buy a home. Visit open houses on Saturdays and Sundays. It’s okay that you’re not yet buying; tell the Realtor at the Open House you’re just beginning your “survey.” You’ll also get to know market prices for different kinds of homes. It’s okay to “window shop” homes on the weekend at Open Houses!

I hope these fundamentals will help you better understand the path to homeownership is a process that, with preparation and dedication, you can move through easily. And if you’re interested in getting Prequalified today to create an Action Plan for your future of Homeownership, call me anytime!

Trevor Curran
NMLS #40140
www.tcurranmortgage.com

*If you thought my answer was helpful, please give me a “Thumbs Up” or “Best Answer.” Thanks!
... more
0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Tue Aug 20, 2013
answered:
Rent today; Buy tomorrow. How to convert from Tenant to Homeowner.

When I rented my first apartment in Astoria, I did not want to be a Tenant my whole life and pay my Landlordâ€s mortgage. I longed to become a Homeowner.

That’s why I found my way into the mortgage business in 1989 and soon afterward became a Homeowner. Here are the fundamentals any Tenant should know to prepare to become a Homeowner in the future, no matter when that might be.

• Credit: Establish 3 credit accounts, no more than 5. Pay your bills on time. Keep your balances to no more than 50% of your credit limit. Don’t pay off the accounts in full. Keep balances active for 12-24 months. All of the above will provide both a good credit score and adequate credit history to qualify for a mortgage loan.

• Assets: A basic savings budget isn’t hard to do. Pay your rent first in your budget; then set aside 10% of your income before taxes . Make it a budget priority and you’ll still have money left over for entertainment and restaurants and clothing.

How much money do you need to buy a home? Many buyers spend no more than $25,000 to buy their first homes. There are loan programs with low down payment requirements and many real estate agents negotiate for their Buyers a “Seller’s concession” to include the Buyer’s closing costs (which are HIGH here in New York!) in the price of the home.

• Income: Two years consistent income is the basic requirement for either a salaried individual or a self-employed person. Income from Bonus, Commission, and Overtime is treated differently and is best discussed with your Mortgage Banker.

• Market Survey: it doesn’t hurt to go out and get to know neighborhoods where you might like to buy a home. Visit open houses on Saturdays and Sundays. It’s okay that you’re not yet buying; tell the Realtor at the Open House you’re just beginning your “survey.” You’ll also get to know market prices for different kinds of homes. It’s okay to “window shop” homes on the weekend at Open Houses!

I hope these fundamentals will help you better understand the path to homeownership is a process that, with preparation and dedication, you can move through easily. And if you’re interested in getting Prequalified today to create an Action Plan for your future of Homeownership, call me anytime!

Trevor Curran
NMLS #40140
www.tcurranmortgage.com

*If you thought my answer was helpful, please give me a “Thumbs Up” or “Best Answer.” Thanks!
... more
0 votes 6 answers Share Flag
Tue Aug 20, 2013
answered:
Rent today; Buy tomorrow. How to convert from Tenant to Homeowner.

When I rented my first apartment in Astoria, I did not want to be a Tenant my whole life and pay my Landlordâ€s mortgage. I longed to become a Homeowner.

That’s why I found my way into the mortgage business in 1989 and soon afterward became a Homeowner. Here are the fundamentals any Tenant should know to prepare to become a Homeowner in the future, no matter when that might be.

• Credit: Establish 3 credit accounts, no more than 5. Pay your bills on time. Keep your balances to no more than 50% of your credit limit. Don’t pay off the accounts in full. Keep balances active for 12-24 months. All of the above will provide both a good credit score and adequate credit history to qualify for a mortgage loan.

• Assets: A basic savings budget isn’t hard to do. Pay your rent first in your budget; then set aside 10% of your income before taxes . Make it a budget priority and you’ll still have money left over for entertainment and restaurants and clothing.

How much money do you need to buy a home? Many buyers spend no more than $25,000 to buy their first homes. There are loan programs with low down payment requirements and many real estate agents negotiate for their Buyers a “Seller’s concession” to include the Buyer’s closing costs (which are HIGH here in New York!) in the price of the home.

• Income: Two years consistent income is the basic requirement for either a salaried individual or a self-employed person. Income from Bonus, Commission, and Overtime is treated differently and is best discussed with your Mortgage Banker.

• Market Survey: it doesn’t hurt to go out and get to know neighborhoods where you might like to buy a home. Visit open houses on Saturdays and Sundays. It’s okay that you’re not yet buying; tell the Realtor at the Open House you’re just beginning your “survey.” You’ll also get to know market prices for different kinds of homes. It’s okay to “window shop” homes on the weekend at Open Houses!

I hope these fundamentals will help you better understand the path to homeownership is a process that, with preparation and dedication, you can move through easily. And if you’re interested in getting Prequalified today to create an Action Plan for your future of Homeownership, call me anytime!

Trevor Curran
NMLS #40140
www.tcurranmortgage.com

*If you thought my answer was helpful, please give me a “Thumbs Up” or “Best Answer.” Thanks!
... more
0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
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