Firing my agent

Asked by Petre Petrov, Pittsburgh, PA Sat May 7, 2011

What happens if I dissolve ties with my agent prior to closing on an HUD foreclosure? I have reasons to believe he didn't act in my best interest (to put it mildly). If I fire him, what happens with the "buyer agent commission" which is included in the total price on the HUD contract?

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37
Blair W. Coh…, Agent, Pittsburgh, PA
Sun May 8, 2011
Petre,

From my experience selling real estate (34 years of it) Buyer's and Seller's unfortunately don't always get along with their agents whether the agent is sincerely keeping the clients best interest at heart and doing the best job of representation or has questionable motives. Usually it comes down to a misunderstanding due to communications or the clients expectations (which are not always reasonable). Believe it or not some clients actually prefer less communications while others want a lot. I was taught that if a client calls you ever other day then the agent should call the client everyday.

Most real estate agents I know are of very high integrity, have their clients best interest in mind, work very hard for their clients and adhere to the National Association Realtors strict code of ethics. There are of course a rare few that are of lower ethical fiber. And that is why local Realtor Associations have a Professional Standards (Ethics and Arbitration) Committee which I served on for 3 years and I am currently a Realtor mediator. If you feel you that your agent is engaging unethical practices you may make a complaint to the local Realtor association, the state real estate commission and/or take civil action in a court of law. But first consider what is involved in any type of action, what the outcome may be and what/if anything you may receive from any such action. There are at least two sides to ever story and is it worth your valuable time and any monies that you may spend to get your "day in court".

All you really want is your agent to do the best job representing your interest, helping you get the home you want for the best price, at the best terms, with the least inconvenience. Taking any of the aforementioned actions is definitely not convenient but there are times when it must be considered. You have a representation contract with your agent and a purchase contract with HUD and there are rights and obligations involved in both. If you can, avoid changing horses (agents) in mid stream. You may be wiser to meet with your agent in person and discuss the situation reasonably and cordially to try to come to an understanding. If you still feel you are not being treated fairly it may be prudent to first try and get your home purchased closed and then consider if it is really worth all the extra hassle to take any action against the agent and relive a sour situation that may or may not end with you getting satisfaction. What you really want is the home. Keep your eyes on the prize (your new home) and not be distracted.

We as professional's value our good name and reputation and receiving referrals from past clients is a great compliment as well as our livelihood. When you close if you are not happy it may be far easier to tell you friends and family that you feel you received poor service.

By the way I have sold HUD and other REOs (bank foreclosure) properties and generally there is a lot more work involved. Our clients don't always see all the work that a good agent does. It's like the tip of the iceberg... you only see the one sixth that is above water. Client and Agent are a team and need to work together, trust and respect each other.

All the best,
Blair
2 votes
Mack McCoy, Agent, Seattle, WA
Sat May 7, 2011
Petre, in my opinion, the "buyer agent commission" goes to the broker who wrote the transaction.

I think every state shares the same viewpoint, which is that brokerages get paid in accordance with the listing agreement. Chances are that the listing agreement doesn't address the buyer's satisfaction with their agent. While I don't think this precludes you from seeking alternative representation, you would have to pay for that representation out-of-pocket.

We in the real estate community tend to mix our messages - confusing the reasons you should choose us as individuals with the reasons we get paid. We get paid for successfully brokering real estate, whether you're happy with the service or not. Sale closes, we get paid. If you're happy with our services and there is no closing, we don't get paid. Except in the rarest of circumstances.

So. If you're in an executory contract, without any remaining contingencies on your end, you can't dissolve the ties.

All the best,
2 votes
Evan H. Stein, , Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Petre:

Certainly have a conversation with your agent and let him/her know that you're unsatisfied and why. As for recourse, the PAR (Pa Association of REALTORS) form for Buyer's Agency doesn't provide many options once a property is under agreement. The perspective in the industry is that a REALTOR's primary job is to help you find your property - from a marketing sense (searching the market, finding a property that meets your needs, interfacing with the seller's agents and negotiating the agreement of sale). Once the deal has become a "legal transaction", Real Estate agents usually take a back seat to Attorneys.

Unfortunately, the argument could be made that if your agent found your house, negotiated on your behalf and put together your agreement of sale, s/he has done his job. And if you're having trouble now, in the legal stage, it could be argued that an Attorney would better serve your needs than a REALTOR.

I know this might not be the answer you're looking for; let me know if there are any other details that I'm overlooking.
2 votes
Dallas Texas, Agent, Dallas, TN
Sun May 8, 2011
It would be awarded to your buyers agent at closing

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The Michael Group - Dallas Business Journal Top Ranked Realtors
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1 vote
Jeffrey Benn…, Agent, Pittsburgh, PA
Sun May 8, 2011
It is highly unusual in this area to ask for commission up front. I have heard of agents who charge a flat fee up front to work with buyers (usually around $500) -- and perhaps that practice will increase along with gas prices -- but there aren't many. (Most major brokers charge both buyers and sellers a nominal flat fee as part of the commission, but it is paid at closing, not up front. No closing = no fee.)

If you signed something to this effect, you're probably out of luck for this transaction. In the future, I suggest you shop around more for an agent; major area brokers don't work like this!

It is typical for HUD properties to sell for more than list price (sometimes a lot more). The HUD list price is a bit like the county assessed value; it has little to do with actual market value. If the house isn't falling down, buyers will bid it up to market. I've had HUD buyers bid full price cash, yet still lose.

While technically possible on their web form, HUD usually doesn't pay closing costs. It is common practice to enter 0 there. Basically HUD is looking at the "net" proceeds, and will take the highest net value. Putting anything there reduces the net, and is equivalent to just lowering the bid price.

It is of course extremely ill-advised to sign blank documents! It is not unusual to have customers sign documents with some bookkeeping details missing (for instance, the MLS # on a listing contract, which you don't even get until you submit the listing, or the agent/broker office/id contact information) -- but never anything substantive, especially anything related to the commission. (It does take HUD a while to come back with signed documents, so some delay there is not unusual.)

I think the main take-home lessons here are 1) shop around for an agent; 2) insist on transparency and complete explanations, and 3) don't sign blank documents.
1 vote
Doug Caye, Agent, Allison Park, PA
Sun May 8, 2011
Petre ,

No negotiating on HUD homes??? we can agree to disagree on that one. How about a signed par agreement of sale is a requirement on every transaction in the state regardless of whether it was put into the computer. Once accepted this was opportunity #2 for you to find out terms and conditions.

I have sold probably a dozen HUD properties this year.. didnt sell one for asking price. That is an agent who is suggesting a bid and sticking to it. While that may not be negotiating in the formal sense it is definately not just offering list price. and you can also campaign for seller assist etc... so Im gonna stick to my guns on this one. I negotiate on behalf of my clients on HUD homes. And your agent should have as well.

Everything else about your experience sounds like a train wreck! I am sorry it appears you were not working with a professional. The fact that you were asked to pay 3000 commission, not hand money? up front is really suspect.

I wish you the best. Sounds like you had a horrible experience and thats unfortunate. Good luck from here on out Petre.
1 vote
Doug Caye, Agent, Allison Park, PA
Sun May 8, 2011
Petre,

The more I read your responses the more intrigued I am. You paid 3000.00 up front? this was not "hand money" but agent commission? thats pretty aggressive- You have not said if the agent controlled both sides of the transaction? Anyway, The BAC is agreed to and essentially paid by the "seller" as compensation for bringing a qualified buyer and getting it done. Any additional commission must be disclosed up front to you as the buyer because your the one paying it. I charge an additional commission ( never anymore than 500.00) because I am 100% worth it. This aint HGTV out here in the trenches dude and the fact that you think a HUD home is LESS paperwork is just so far from accurate I cant even begin to tell you. What we do as agents behind the scenes in getting all of your ducks in a row and lining up all the BS involved is astonishing. I tell my clients this up front and make them sign a document stating that there is an additonal charge to them. (sellers and buyers ). Now that being said, if the agent did not tell you they had an additional or minimum commission shame on them. If you signed a piece pf paper without reading it shame on you.

I guess what it really gets down to is this obsession with the commission. If I put in a bid for a buyer on a house and saved them 12,000 dollars etc.. and used my negotiating abilities to bring about a great deal for my buyer and still keep the seller happy. I should be paid for that. and in the 40 or so buyer controlled sales I do each year ALL of my clients have been gracious for my efforts. Because they couldnt have done it without me. And I always, always tell my clients exactly what they will be paying and what they will be paying for up front. I feel bad for you because it appears on the surface you were taken advantage of. I feel bad for the agent because I think if they would have just taken a bit more time to explain the process to you and what you should expect from them. You would have paid the commission and still be very happy with your purchase.

Other than that I would try communication!! talk to agent- and broker. If you still feel slighted and cant come to an agreement theres always a fun afternoon at the board of Realtors (hope you agents a Realtor!)
1 vote
Jeffrey Benn…, Agent, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
In my experience, foreclosures often require *more* work. It's true there is not much work on the listing side -- there are no agent tours, open houses, showings you have to set up with the seller, etc. Always vacant, they are also easy to show for buyer agents. There is much less of the usual (some would say "fun") work of real estate agents -- but a lot more bureaucratic/legal work, that many would describe as "tedious and risky".

All the closing work still needs to be done, and these kinds of properties are much more likely to have title issues and other snags. I had one where the city required a working water meter for closing, but it had been stolen. These properties may be in poor condition, with utilities off. Banks will typically not turn them on, in case it blows up or leaks and lowers the property value. You can't inspect properly unless the utilities are on, but you can't turn the utilities on until after closing. No dating until after you're married!

Sometimes you also get invited to the "occupancy permit" dance, where you can't close without an occupancy permit, but can't get an occupancy permit until you fix things... which you can't do until you close. Usually some temporary permit can be arranged, or you just can't occupy it while you're fixing it up.

Finally, the legal risk on these -- as your broker may be about to find out -- is much greater, and open-ended.
There's probably some statute of limitations, but in practice lawsuits can crop up years later. It's never
really "over".

The bottom line is, you're engaging the full services of the broker, who is incurring all these risks.
Commissions are very low, so in general these deals are high risk / low reward. In order for brokers to do these at all, most charge a minimum commission. A typical minimum is $2,000. So if the commission is $1,250, and the buyer agency agreement had a $2,000 minimum, the "cost sheet" I provide buyers would have the extra $750 on it.

Needless to say, I disclose this *when they start looking*, and remind them of it frequently, especially
before presenting an offer. Unpleasant surprises = lawsuits!

Without these minimums, it would not be worth it for most brokers to take on
these deals, so buyers would either be self-represented -- assuming all duties of the agent, with associated
risks -- or sub-agency would return, where the seller's agent would do everything, but only represent the seller.

An extra $3,000 seems excessive (mine would be more like $750), but I don't know all the particulars of the case. Unfortunately, if you signed something agreeing to pay $3,000 at closing, there's probably very little you can do legally. (Standard disclaimer to seek legal advice from an attorney.) Make sure it says $3,000 extra, and not $3,000 minimum (in which case you'd pay only $1,750). The HUD settlement sheet will show the actual charge.

You can still *try* to negotiate the fee with the broker; you haven't closed yet, and commission is negotiable
by law. If you signed a contract, he can hold you to it, but he doesn't *have* to. You have little to lose by
asking.

In the end it may be that all you can do is file a complaint. It's a lesson to you to read things carefully and ask questions before signing, and a lesson to the broker to be a lot more transparent about disclosing fees!

Agency requires more than simply putting papers in front of someone and asking them to sign, or even reading contract clauses out loud without further explanation. Agency requires *making the client understand* the implications and consequences of what they're signing, so that they can make an informed decision.
1 vote
Luther Worma…, Agent, Monroeville, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Petre, after fully reading your situation. I'm thinking maybe you might just be uncomfortable with the thought of paying 11% commission. After doing some quick math, I'm sure my fee would have been close to the brokers as well. I have a minimum fee as some other Realtors do. The 3% commission would not have covered it.

To say there is a lot of work and liability left for your agent after agreeing on a price would be an understatement. For my services, yes $900ish would not cut it either. No I would not charge an extra $2500ish but it would be close. Some buyers look for a discount agent , some buyers expect a certain level of service and are willing to pay for it. It sounds to me that you expect a certain level of service at the discount agent price, and it doesn't work that way.

I think if you actually put the figures in, instead of the percentages, you would probably get similar responses as mine.

Sorry but don't be upset when you actually do get what you paid for.
1 vote
Karen Parsons…, Agent, Laguna Beach, CA
Sat May 7, 2011
Hi Petre,

Wow....so sorry! Sounds like you want the property and are in an open escrow....and have signed an agreement with the agent. Whew....

Since the agent is an independent broker, that does limit the help available. If you do wan the home, I would suggest that you continue with the transaction if all else is good, and then seek damages afterwards if you feel there is fraud involved. (not giving legal advice....but highly recommending you seek at least a free consultation from one). You might be in a position to take action after the close to recoup damages.

I hope that this works out.....seek some advice now and see what can be accomplished.

Karen
1 vote
Petre Petrov, Home Buyer, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Thanks, Dan! You hit it right on the head. I signed something I shouldn't have, without knowing exactly what's what. I guess my only recourse is the Board of Realtors. From all the answers, it seems that the best course of action is to complete the sale and pursue litigations later.
1 vote
Dan Tabit, Agent, Issaquah, WA
Sat May 7, 2011
Petre,
Before engaging an attorney, review every line of every document you signed. If there is no mention of additional fees and this agent sprung them on you out of the blue, I can't imagine how the request would be enforceable. If you agreed to the terms in writing, but weren't aware of what you were signing, you are likely obligated to pay. Your only option to avoid this would be to spend a lot more than $3000 on an attorney and admit you signed something you shouldn't have.
Your other avenues are to pursue a complaint to the local Board of Realtors if your agent is a member, the local Multiple Listing Service and or finally the state department of licensing. As agents/brokers we all have to answer to someone even if we own our firm.
1 vote
Doug Caye, Agent, Allison Park, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Most of us have some sort of buyers service guarentee just send certified letter to the broker- If the deal is going forward your agent will be paid regardless of what you do- he has written an offer on your behalf and gotten it accepted. If it falls through you can work w someone else-- side note. There is NO WAY hud would have approved a loan with an eleven percent commission.. Sounds like someones not getting all the info right. But 11% thats just not going to happen... ever!
1 vote
Luther Worma…, Agent, Monroeville, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Hi Petre,

I would suggest talking with your agent/ broker and let him explain the situation. Possibly a misunderstanding and a conversation is all that's needed. If it is what you said, "an agent not acting in your best interest," then that would be a major issue. One that could be pursued even after the completion of your sale (would suggest a Real Estate Attorney for this matter.) Personally I'd communicate with the agent first and clear it up and continue with the transaction. Of course, I don't know the complete circumstances so it's hard for me to be specific, but to every problem there is a solution.

Hope this helps
1 vote
Jeffrey Benn…, Agent, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
As Evan points out, the Buyer's Agency Agreement governs here. Depending on the price range, some HUDs have extremely low commissions (as in $100), so a Buyer Agency Agreement not only establishes the business relationship, but may also have a minimum commission clause obligating you to pay some portion of it. The sales agreement should also state the commission.

Assuming you have this agreement, remember it's a contract between you and the broker -- not you and the agent. Depending on the broker (policies on this vary), you can usually "fire" an agent by calling the broker and getting another one assigned. It's the broker that gets issued the commission check, not the agent. You may be able to swap agents before closing, or even have the broker do the transaction. In any case the buyer side commission goes to the broker, but depending on what you work out, it might not be shared with the "fired" agent.

It's a delicate situation, since the buyer agent would be on the sales agreement and closing documents, and typically schedules everything with the closing company. If you don't close, you could be in default and lose your deposit. If it's more of a personal dispute or issue with the agent, and doesn't affect your decision to buy, it may be best to close and deal with it later.

I would certainly discuss the situation with the broker first;. Ultimately, for very serious violations, you can complain to the Real Estate commission or consult an attorney. (Always consult a qualified real estate attorney for legal advice; agents' opinions here aren't legal advice.)

If you don't have an agency agreement... things get really interesting. Now it depends on the sales agreement itself and the specific addendums that go along with these HUD deals, which can vary widely. In that case I would say consult an attorney (though still try to resolve it through the broker first). The broker/agent may be out of luck then, which is why license law and broker policy require us to establish a clear business relationship with the buyer agency agreement. Good luck!
1 vote
Emily Murphy, Agent, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
It would likely be in your best interest to contact a real estate attorney.
1 vote
Anna M Brocco, Agent, Williston Park, NY
Sat May 7, 2011
If procuring cause can be proven by the broker and if you have a signed agreement, fortunately or unfortunately, the commission was earned; depending on the agent's actions, you also may wish to consult with an attorney; and again, depending on his/her actions, you may wish to report the agent to the local Board of Realty, and or the State's Real Estate Commission.
1 vote
Craig Keto, Agent, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
You'll need to start with the agent's broker.

I don't force any buyers to sign any agreements to work with me. If we don't get along, fire me. I know that won't happen. Signing things is way too stuffy and reeks of neediness.
1 vote
Anna M Brocco, Agent, Williston Park, NY
Sat May 7, 2011
If you believe your agent didn't act in your best interest, do have a discussion with him/her; if the chat proves unsatisfactory to you, contact his/her broker owner and or office manager and express your concerns; you can ask to be assigned another agent from within for the duration of the transaction...
1 vote
Evan H. Stein, , Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Hi Petre:

Did you sign a Buyer's Agency Agreement? And does it provide a remedy for this situation?

Evan
1 vote
Cathy Bureau, Agent, San Antonio, TX
Tue May 10, 2011
Pete -

If you have a grievance I would first discuss with the agent, next I would discuss with the broker. In my experience I have found that making snap decisions and one-sided decisions result in a mess. I also want to ad that unless you have experience in real estate, with HUD homes, then I would seriously say that you need to dig deeper with the agent first. Because you asked about the buyer's agent commission I question your motive. I would drop that aspect of it and just work out your issues up the line. Most things can be remedied with clear two way communication.

Cathy Bureau
Web Reference:  http://www.CathyBureau.com
0 votes
Gerard Carney, Agent, Spring Hill, FL
Tue May 10, 2011
Petre you should have decided before hand that the agent was not good for you, if you are in contract, what part of did not act in your best interest? Your agent is there to make sure the sale goes smoothly and legally, what more can you be asking from them. They got you to contract and now you want to take their commission out from under them. This sounds more like you want to slip out from paying your agent. thankfully the contract protects the agent of this, the closing will go as planned and the agent will be paid their due at closing! Fire hiom and he still gets his commission. The only one that should be looking out for your best interest is you! You tell an agent what you want, they find it for you, set up the sale for you what other interest should they be concerned with?
0 votes
David Cooper, Agent, Los Angeles, CA
Mon May 9, 2011
Petre. Is the purchase of this HUD house a good deal? I never, ever let personalities get in the way of closing a paying a commission if tghe deal gets done. Close on the purchase first, then discuss your concerns after you have the deed in your name



David Cooper..Las Vegas Foreclosure Investor in Bank Owned REOs with Cash Flow. email or call for FREE daily list. +1-7024997037 not a real estate agent
0 votes
Scott Godzyk, Agent, Manchester, NH
Mon May 9, 2011
It is going to depend what type of agent he is, if you signed a buyer broker agreement or if they are just a transactional broker. In virtually all cases they would still get paid their commission, but if you have a problem, rather than just ending it, speak with them or go over their head to their broker with your concerns to see if you it can be resolved. Unfortanately just firing thenm doesnt make them go away.
Web Reference:  http://www.ScottSellsNH.com
0 votes
Petre Petrov, Home Buyer, Pittsburgh, PA
Sun May 8, 2011
Thank you for your response. I appreciate you taking the time to explain, and I will keep in mind all the valuable points you brought up.
0 votes
Petre Petrov, Home Buyer, Pittsburgh, PA
Sun May 8, 2011
Doug,

I am more ready to admit my ignorance as to what goes on "behind the scenes" or "in the trenches." It could very well be that I am underestimating the amount of work my broker puts or will put into this. I don't think that I am "obsessed" with the commission. I am simply bothered by the following things that transpired:

1) The commission had to be paid upfront, before any work was actually done (except for the bid).

2) As for the bid itself, the agent did not "use his negotiating abilities to bring about a great deal". You know very well that there are no negotiations on HUD foreclosures. Everything is done on the computer: you enter the bid, then wait 'til the next day to find out if it was accepted. The agent asked me how much I want to bid, I told him (100% of the asking price), he suggested i ad 10% on top of that. That was the entire "negotiation."

3) The agent did not tell me that HUD could cover a portion of the closing costs. He simply entered 0% on the form (AFTER I HAD SIGNED IT), which means that I am left to pay all of those costs by myself.

4) After I won the bid, he sent me the HUD documents to sign, all of which WERE BLANK. He ensured me that he will "fill in everything." But this means that I didn't get to see how much he is making on the sale.

5) He didn't send me the signed HUD contract until late last week, some 30 DAYS AFTER IT WAS SIGNED!!!

Do these sound to you like legitimate grievances. Or do you still think I am "obsessed" with the commission?
0 votes
Petre Petrov, Home Buyer, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Jeffrey, this is an awesome answer. Thanks so much for taking the time to explain so diligently and lucidly. I really appreciate it. Things are much clearer now. I still feel I'm being taken advantage of, but it's good to know that tagging "extras" to the HUD commissions is a standard practice. I really did not know anything about all those legal snags you mentioned.
0 votes
Evan H. Stein, , Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Yes! Brokers get paid at the time of closing.
0 votes
Petre Petrov, Home Buyer, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Luther, I appreciate your answer and reasoning. Let's make some things clear:
1) HUD foreclosures require much less work on the agents part, agreed?
2) The HUD commission he will get is $1,250, not $900
3) The extra charge is $3,000, not $2,500
All in all, he is getting $4,250. My question is, "For what?" The $3,000 was paid upfront, which suggests that this is payment for filing the bid documents with HUD. It must have taken him 1 hour at most. You may be right that there is "a lot of work and liability left", but if this is the case, they should be compensated when they are actually over and done, no?
0 votes
Petre Petrov, Home Buyer, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Doug, thanks for your answer. The 11% is not in the HUD contract, of course. That gives only 3%. The rest is from the buyer broker contract: the extra commission that I mentioned. Together the two make up more than 11%
0 votes
Bill Eckler, Agent, Venice, FL
Sat May 7, 2011
Petre,

Putting agents in a position of "taking sides" without accurate and complete information is not a fair expectation.

We find that many disageeements are the direct result of poor communication that develops into a misunderstanding. Having a face-to-face meeting to share your concerns may not only clear the air but help both paries to understand the issues at hand.

After aren't you both working toward the same goal.....having you obtaing the home of your choice.

Our recommendation, man up....and seek a sensible solution, trying not to be part of the problem.

Good luck,

Bill
0 votes
Petre Petrov, Home Buyer, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Jeffrey, Benny, in this case AGENT=BROKER (i.e., the agent is also the owner of the firm)
0 votes
Petre Petrov, Home Buyer, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Evan, this is a very helpful answer. Thanks. Since we are talking about a HUD foreclosure, the "work" of the agent is really minimal. I found the house listed, he didn't have to search for it, show me different properties, negotiate, etc. He did put a bid on it for me and he did file the contract documents. But he also failed to disclose crucial information, and he asked me to pay him an extra commission(on top of what he gets from the sale) which he has not deserved (to the tune of $3,000).

I do take your point, however, that attorney would be my best recourse at the present moment.
0 votes
Benny Smith, Agent, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
The question I suspect you are really asking is can you take the commission. The answer is no. However your contract is with the borkerage not an agent. So contact the Broker and get someone else assinged if you wish.
0 votes
Tim Moore, Agent, Kitty Hawk, NC
Sat May 7, 2011
Some states don't use procuring cause and it is a hard thing to argue anyway. Since you have a fully ratified contract, your agent is pretty much for sure going to get the commission. If you have a problem with your agent then you need to address the issues with their broker or the local Board of Realtors or the state Real Estate Commission, but that side of the commission is going to someone and since your agent wrote the ratified offer it is going to them. Actually the commission goes to the company they work for and the broker will give it to the agent. You could get that broker to give some to your agent and some to another agent they assign to replace your current agent and that might be your best action. Go speak to the broker and share your concerns.
0 votes
Petre Petrov, Home Buyer, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Emily, do you know an attorney in Pittsburgh whom you've worked with and trust?
0 votes
Petre Petrov, Home Buyer, Pittsburgh, PA
Sat May 7, 2011
Anna, the agent in question is also the owner of the company. No way to go "up the ladder".

Evan, there is a buyer agency agreement, but it does not answer my question. It is a standard contract, with the usual verbiage about the broker providing "honest service," etc.
0 votes
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