What to pay a mortgage broker if you don't end up using them?

Asked by Annalee123, Sacramento, CA Wed Sep 22, 2010

I've been working with a mortgage broker, but have settled on a bank owned home. The bank is offering me good incentives and a good interest rate so it make sense to just use them for the loan. What would be an appropriate amount to pay my mortgage broker for the work he's done? He's sat down with me twice and explained a lot of the way loans work with me. He has collected all my paperwork and even volunteered to send it over to the bank so I didn't have to do it twice. He's always answered my phone calls and has been extremely helpful. I would like to pay him for his time and effort. What is a good amount? If it makes any difference, the house is $150,000.

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51
Annalee123, Home Buyer, Sacramento, CA
Wed Sep 22, 2010
Thanks for all the quick responses!

I am working with a buyer's agent. He told me to get a GFE from the bank and from the mortgage broker I've been dealing with and he'll compare them with me. He did mention that the bank could up the prices on certain items to compensate for the $3000 towards closing they are offering me as an incentive.

Sue - The availability/professional aspect is something I'm concerned about. My mortgage broker has been so professional and available any time I need him. I can't say the same for the loan officer from the bank. He's started making jokes with coworkers when he's on the phone with me. I'm not offended by it or anything, it just makes me wonder if he's unprofessional on the phone what else might happen with him. Once I get the GFE, I think I'll be able to make a better decision. If they are within $1000 of each other it might just be smarter to go with my mortgage broker who has been awesome. That is of course if he can get me an interest rate comparable to the rate the bank has offered.
1 vote
Gregorio Den…, , San Diego, CA
Wed Sep 22, 2010
If he is ethical, he cannot accept your money. A broker cannot be compensated outside of a closing. If you liked his / her work, refer your friends to them. Don't feel guilty about it, these things happen.
Web Reference:  http://WeFixRates.Com
1 vote
Drichman, Agent, New York, NY
Wed Aug 24, 2016
We are like saints, and the government restricts what we can make and how we can make it. We are the most heavily regulated business on Earth. If you tried to regulate the income of a doctor or attorney the way our income is regulated you would be branded as a communist. But somehow it is OK in the mortgage industry.

No we can accept nothing, not even when a kind borrower is willing to voluntarily give a gift to me . All people tell me is "Hey - You picked this job " But no The job picked me ...And still we are hated and mistrusted.

This woman is a saint a well, most people take my work and are happy not to pay anything at all and do not even consider the time I took out of my life to help them . Thank you - this was so refreshing and just what I needed today. I had a client withdraw because their credit report expired and I needed a new one after 6 months on a rehab loan and they were angry because I asked them to pay their credit tab.
0 votes
Michael Kirk…, , West Hartford, CT
Thu Aug 29, 2013
We are in the business of sales. Some deals go and some do not. If you appreciated your mortgage brokers hard work, when the opportunity arises, refer them another mortgage client.
0 votes
Cameron Novak, Agent, Corona, CA
Thu Aug 29, 2013
That is extremely good of you. Many people take agents and mortgage brokers for granted. I'd say anything you think is fair is what you should give.

If I were the broker, I'd feel very honored if you gave me $300 or more ($500 would be spectacular).

Most important might be your promise to send him anyone you might speak with who needs mortgage services.

Thank you on behalf of the entire real estate community for having some integrity!
0 votes
Jim Ventura, Agent, Los Alamitos, CA
Mon Aug 26, 2013
What a nice lady! They are correct, refer, you owe him/her no monies - in the current system.

I'd like to use this as a platform though to discuss the other side.

Why do you think this very nice lady is wanting to pay this person? Because he DESERVES some form of payment! He has done work for this client, and she feels she owes him something. Now let's look at everyone else for a second. If you go to the dentist, carpenter, nail salon - etc. (you get the picture) they expect to be paid, and society expects to pay them.

The way we have let this go in this industry, society EXPECTS that realtors, loan officers etc. work for free unless something happens, and then they feel we are overpaid in general... thus, regenerating the expectation that we should not be paid for work that doesn't "pan out".

Our compensation under this system works out for those who work at it - but why is it ILLEGAL to be compensated for our time on another basis, say, hourly? I don't like that the regulators are involved to "protect" the innocent homeowner. The "innocent homeowner" needs protection, but compensation should not be something where we are so restricted. I believe that there certainly should be other compensation models - and the consumer could BENEFIT from them as well.

Haters, you may begin your attack.

Broker, 15 years, Architect
0 votes
Michael Kown…, Agent, Northfield, NJ
Mon Oct 4, 2010
No Monetary amount is due just thank him for his time. That is his job descriprion.
0 votes
Annalee123, Home Buyer, Sacramento, CA
Thu Sep 30, 2010
I just feel bad because I'm new to this area and I don't know too many people here so I don't really have anyone to refer. Of course I'm meeting people at my new job so hopefully one of them will bring up buying a house and I can give them a great recommendation for a broker!

Am I allowed to give my real estate agent a gift or is he under the same restrictions?

I'm in escrow and Oct. 25th is my closing date!
0 votes
Phyllis McAr…, Agent, San mateo, CA
Thu Sep 30, 2010
Annalee, You truly are a refreshing change. all of what these good people of trulia are saying is right on. Let your friends and family know about the mortgage person Let them know that he was gracious and deserves a great rating on your local internet review site,
0 votes
Stevens Kenc…, Agent, Greenwich, CT
Thu Sep 30, 2010
Refer refer refer! You are an extremely nice and caring person in a world of jerks to want to compensate your mortgage broker. You should be commended. I would talk to your broker and ask them. I'm confident they will refuse, but who knows.
Web Reference:  http://www.spe.me
0 votes
Scott McInto…, Agent, Los Angeles, CA
Wed Sep 29, 2010
Mr. home buyer, that is a very honorable to want to compensate your mortgage broker for his time. Unfortunately, you are in the extreme minority to have this kind of mindset. It would be a wonderful thing if more people would go around respecting other peoples' time, work and effort. Whether it's in the real estate industry or not. Anyway, I think the best way to compensate your mortgage broker would be to give them referrals to your family, friends and co-workers.

Congrats on the new home purchase!
0 votes
James Wehner, Agent, Scottsdale, AZ
Wed Sep 29, 2010
One of the best ways I can think or repaying your loan officer is to refer everyone you know looking for a loan to them. A referral is the biggest compliment you can give a realtor/ loan officer.

It great to see your consideration for them. Kudos to you!
Web Reference:  http://www.jameswehner.com
0 votes
Sandra Ormer…, Agent, Sonoma, CA
Wed Sep 29, 2010
Congratulations on your new home purchase. It is the nature of the business that agents and mortgage brokers don't get paid until a transaction closes. The greatest gift you can give your mortgage broker is to refer him to your friends and colleagues. Getting thru the financing hoops is one of most challenging part of the process. Having a focused and responsive partner on the loan side is key to successfully closing a transaction on time. I'm sure you're mortgage broker will be very appreciative of the referrals.

Best of luck to you.

Sandra Ormerod
Sotheby's International Realty
0 votes
Michele Waugh, Agent, Barboursville, WV
Wed Sep 29, 2010
Annalee,
I want to commend you for even thinking about compensating your lender for all his hard work. That is not something we see in our business everyday. Like you have heard from all the others, the best way to pay him for all his hard work is to refer him to your family, friends and co-workers,anyone you may know that might be looking to buy in the future. Pay it forward. Congratulations on finding your new home!
0 votes
Sheri Rathor, Agent, Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Wed Sep 29, 2010
Congratulations on your new purchase. First of all I would like to thank you on behalf of that lender as you've acknowledged the fact that he worked hard for you and did not get compensated. It happens all the time in this line of work and lenders only get paid when they help the client close the transaction. As a career based on relationships, referrals are huge part of building clientele and the best way to pay him back is to pay forward and reffer your friends or anyone you know to him.
0 votes
Ann Hayes, , Sierra Vista, AZ
Wed Sep 29, 2010
Mortgage brokers and Realtors work very dilligently to help the client in his/her pursuit of the home of his choice. But, sometimes there are circumstances where it doesn't work out and the loan does not close; or,in your case, the best financial posture for you is to have the bank-owned property lender handle your loan. It's just one of those occurrences that happens, and your mortgage broker should not get paid, because he didn't close your loan.
0 votes
Jeff Nunley,…, , Eugene, OR
Wed Sep 29, 2010
The most important thing you can do for this mortgage broker is a good quality referral (s). As a mortgage broker myself nothing is more important to my business than good referral from satisfied clients.
0 votes
Heidi Mergen…, Agent, Niles, IL
Wed Sep 29, 2010
You are a respectful person for wanting to pay the mortgage broker for his time. I wish more people would consider this for realtors who list a home and never get paid for all the time they put into marketing and showing and then the seller decides to list with someone else. Or all the agents who show people numerous properties and the buyer never buys or finds a relative who is in the business....
If you feel he has done you a service, you might want to take him out to a great dinner and always keep him in mind for referrals.
0 votes
Mary Beth Co…, Agent, Gray, GA
Wed Sep 29, 2010
With the RESPA laws in effect, you may not give anything to your mortgage broker. You may, however, refer this broker, commending him/her for their professionalism. Good for you!
0 votes
Tom Duffy, Agent, Sewell, NJ
Wed Sep 29, 2010
Annalee,

First let me applaud you for being a thoughtful person to even consider this question. Time and time again people use others services without even giving this a thought if they end up not using that service, even if the person was very helpful. They best way to ever repay anyone who has done you right, is to refer them to anyone you speak to about obtaining a mortgage and telling others how helpful they were. A great referral will always be the best complement.

Tom Duffy
0 votes
Paul Burton, , Midwest City, OK
Tue Sep 28, 2010
It depends on what you agreed to. If he was to receive a commission based on your mortgage and you did not get one, then you don't owe him anything.

It is a nice thought to want to compensate someone's time, but keep in mind referrals are the best compensation he could receive from you.
0 votes
Vincent Vill…, Agent, Chula Vista, CA
Tue Sep 28, 2010
Actually you dont have to pay him/her. but like the previous post it sounds like your mortgage broker is a good one try to refer them clients in the future. I am sure the broker would like that. Losing clients in our business does happen.
0 votes
John Georges, Agent, San Diego, CA
Mon Sep 27, 2010
The best way to pay you Mortgage Broker is to refer him to your friends and associates. Sounds like you hooked up with an excellent person.
0 votes
Kim Vitale, Agent, Blue Point, NY
Mon Sep 27, 2010
It is very commendable that you recognize that your realtor has done alot of work for you. It is very thoughtful!
0 votes
Gregorio Den…, , San Diego, CA
Mon Sep 27, 2010
Annalee,

Your wanting to do a kind gesture is appreciated, but RE agents don't understand that a mortgage broker cannot accept anything of value from you. Not a gift card, not a peanut butter sandwich. The advice for dinner and other things is just plain wrong. Give them your thanks and your referrals, they cannot accept anything else.
Web Reference:  http://WeFixRates.Com
0 votes
Kim Noonan, Agent, New Lenox, IL
Mon Sep 27, 2010
I wish there was a way to give a permanent thumbs-up to Annalee!

What a gracious and loyal person you are - and it's a shame that you've been caught up in an REO-held-for- ransom property. There are a few lender/asset holders holders that throw insanely great terms in their counter if you use "their" lender.

Last year, I had one that countered my buyer $2000 LESS than his offer, and while we asked for 3% towards closing costs, they offered 6%. Without their lender? The counter was at his offer, but they would not pay closing costs at all, nor would they take an FHA deal.

Tough decision - and while he respected his very thorough and professional loan officer, he really wanted that property. Theoretically, he could still have used his lender, but he would have needed to find more money somewhere for a downpayment.

He called his loan officer, who couldn't match those terms, either. The LO was disappointed but understood - and kept my client's info on file - and just did a 1+% rate reduction refi for my client. Time-deferred business and a win-win for both of them!
Web Reference:  http://www.kimnoonan.com
0 votes
Tyler Stewart, Agent, Whitefish, MT
Mon Sep 27, 2010
I think a thank you card expressing your gratitude towards the broker for being so helpful and the promise of passing on your positive experience to others is appropriate. After all, the broker should have your best interests at heart and want you to get the best possible deal. If you still feel as though you should compensate the broker in some way, a gift certificate to a local restaurant is a good idea.
0 votes
Karla Wagner, Agent, Bonney Lake, WA
Mon Sep 27, 2010
The world needs more appreciative people like you! I would recommend referring him to anyone that is in need of a good lender contact. That is the best gift he could receive from you. :)

Best wishes.
0 votes
Anthony Rueda…, , 95624
Fri Sep 24, 2010
It's so considerate of you to be thinking of your mortgage broker. I think a gift certificate to a nice restaurant would be appropriate. However, I would give the 1st mortgage broker the opportunity to match the good faith estimate from your new mortgage professional. In my opinion, that is fair.

Good luck!
0 votes
Annalee123, Home Buyer, Sacramento, CA
Thu Sep 23, 2010
I was kind of thinking that about the appraisal. I looked on Zillow (which I know isn't totally accurate) and its "zestimate" is $150,500.

David - I hope I'm being loyal to my real estate agent too! He has also been SO extremely helpful. He always answers his phone when available and calls me back the same day. He has shown me about 10-15 houses and has written up about 5 offers total. I feel bad that he probably won't make much commission because my budget is $150,000. I told him that some day he will be selling me one of the $300,000 houses that are over the fence from this $150,000 house! I've told him numerous times that I really appreciate how responsive he has been to me. He will be getting a nice gift from me as well : ) I'm not sure what to get though. I was thinking maybe a big gift card to a fancy restaurant for him and his wife. He has spent many nights talking to me on the phone and writing up offers for me...they deserve a nice night out together!
0 votes
David Jaffe, Agent, Arlington Heights, IL
Thu Sep 23, 2010
It is very commendable that you are willing to pay a mortgage broker for the time and effort he has worked for you. You should have the lender for the bank owned property give you a good faith estimate on closing costs and give you the APR of the loan the bank is offering you. The APR factors in closing costs, points, lender fees, & the interest rate they are charging. This puts all lenders on the same playing field...

I would give your mortage broker a chance to meet or beat what they are offering you. You may find he is motivated to earn your business.

Keep in mind, the purchase price of the home should have no bearing if you choose to work with the bank that owns the home.

I hope you are as loyal with your real estate agent as you are with your mortgage lender....

Best of luck... David
0 votes
Annalee123, Home Buyer, Sacramento, CA
Thu Sep 23, 2010
That is what is so frustrating to me. The loan officer from the bank who has contacted me is not very good at returning my calls. He has gotten a little better now that I've agreed to their terms.

I just hate knowing that the mortgage broker I've been working with is so much better. He always answers my calls or immediately calls me back. He has even gone out of his way to meet me on weekends. I know I'm not going to get near the same service from this bank.

I told my realtor I feel very bad about not being able to use the mortgage broker I've been working with. They are actually good friends with each other and he told me not to worry about it because it's just the nature of the business. My realtor told me he'd contact the mortgage broker to explain to him what happened. I also plan on calling him and writing him a card thanking him for doing such a great job at helping me. I will also recommend anyone looking for a house to him. I'm hoping to save money and have income properties and will definitely use him for the financing!
0 votes
Annalee123, Home Buyer, Sacramento, CA
Thu Sep 23, 2010
Elizabeth - Did he regret it because the bank did not end up treating him well throughout the process?

My dad questioned why I didn't offer less than they were asking which kind of has me second guessing myself. The market here is so crazy right now. I've put so many offers on houses and still get outbid. I even bid $15,000 over asking price on one house and was still outbid. My realtor ran comps on this house and thought it was priced fairly. I just decided to go in at full price to avoid getting outbid again but the house had already been on the market 100 days...granted they had dropped the price $8,000 right before I put in my offer.
0 votes
Annalee123, Home Buyer, Sacramento, CA
Thu Sep 23, 2010
My realtor said he doesn't know why they are playing hardball when we've offered full price and there aren't any other offers. The house has also been sitting on the market for awhile. I guess I'm a little afraid to play hardball with them because I don't want to risk losing the house.

Am I allowed to say the name of the bank without jeopardizing getting the house? : )

This is really frustrating but I guess it's better than a short sale!
0 votes
Roswell Moore…, Mortgage Broker Or Lender, Scottsdale, AZ
Thu Sep 23, 2010
Annalee,

I am sorry to hear how you are being taken advantage of. It can be brutal in the real estate jungle. Can you please let us know which back owns this property?

All the best,
Ros
0 votes
Annalee123, Home Buyer, Sacramento, CA
Thu Sep 23, 2010
Well they will let me use my own lender but only if I agree to their ridiculous counter offer terms. They raised the deposit to $4500 and removed all appraisal and loan contingencies. So basically if it doesn't appraise or work with my FHA financing, I lose that $4500. My realtor told me he had never seen terms like that and that he wouldn't recommend signing an agreement with no contingencies to protect me.

We counter offered with a $2000 deposit and put the contingencies back in place. They called and said they'd only accept that if I agree to use their lender. I agreed because I really want the house, but it seems like they just trapped me into using them.

I know $4500 might not seem like a lot to some people, but I'm just 23 years old and have been trying really hard to save my money for a down payment. If I lost that $4500, it would really put a road block in me buying my house.
0 votes
Rudi Hofmann, Mortgage Broker Or Lender, El Segundo, CA
Thu Sep 23, 2010
Annalee,

To my knowledge an REO may require that you get pre-approved for a loan with them, but it's illegal for them to require you finance with them to purchase their REO property.

Hang in there. Surely, some Real Estate Agents will come on board that have REO experience to give you their opinion.

Best wishes, Rudi
Web Reference:  http://www.umboc.com
0 votes
Annalee123, Home Buyer, Sacramento, CA
Thu Sep 23, 2010
My real estate agent called me today and told the bank is refusing to accept my offer unless I agree to use them as the lender. He told me that if I really want the house to go ahead and accept the incentives they're offering because they look decent.

I'm really bummed because I really do love the house, but I'm not excited to use their lender...especially since now they've forced me to use them so they know they don't have to treat me that well because there's no competition.
0 votes
Rudi Hofmann, Mortgage Broker Or Lender, El Segundo, CA
Thu Sep 23, 2010
@Scott,

That's as much bad information as I've seen from one of my peers. I've seen a lot with over 5,100 contributions on Zillow the past three years.

I don't think you even read the Op's question entirely, or you wouldn't have respond in this manner. At least I hope you wouldn't have.

Please excuse him Annalee.
Best wishes, Rudi
Web Reference:  http://www.umboc.com
0 votes
Scott Sheldon, , Petaluma, CA
Thu Sep 23, 2010
Hi Anna,

I have a question. Why would you refer anyone to a lender that you do not work with? Refer to the lender that you end up working with because that person will probably end up doing a good job for you. Us lenders need to realize that we work for you and the good ones have a vested interest in making sure that you are wildly happy with the service we provide. The other thing you might want to consider is not working with a mortgage broker. Mortgage brokers have no control over the lender, the lender being the actual company that funds your loan. If you are truly looking to get the best deal possible consider working with a direct mortgage lender. Direct lenders have skin in the game and they are on the hook and as a result can work with you that much better. I wouldn't give a mortgage broker who you don't work with anything other than an explanation. By the way who ever you end up working with, you should check to make sure they have a license to originate loans. If you work with a bank like Chase etc. those loan officers are not licensed and are not paid in the same way that independent mortgage bankers are and as a result are less concerned with closing your loan on time. Here's a link to the website you can search yourself on who is the cream of the crop.http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/

Good luck:)
0 votes
Rudi Hofmann, Mortgage Broker Or Lender, El Segundo, CA
Thu Sep 23, 2010
Whatever the REO is offering, you have experienced a professional. You have also experience a non-professional at the bank.

Your current mortgage loan originator should be able to come close if not right on. What has been shown to you is you have someone you know you can count on that you appreciate. That's very important. Trust is not easily gained and should be cherished.

Happy funding, Rudi
Web Reference:  http://www.umboc.com
0 votes
Jerry R. Ray, , Portland, OR
Thu Sep 23, 2010
We wish there were more folks like you. Often times we spend many hours/days working on loan files to never see compensation for our time - this is business however.

Your desire to compensate your lender is admirable and my advice would be to at least pay for the charges the lender will encure if there are any given the deal fell through. Example: Appraisal (around $400., a broken lock (if lender is charged for the broken lock agreement).

Truly thoughtful on your part but not required.
0 votes
Rich Homer, Agent, NAPLES, FL
Thu Sep 23, 2010
Good of you to think thoughtfully here. I would give him a chance to match the banks offer or a check in an amount you believe properly compensates would be nice.
http://www.naplesrealestateguys.com/browser/news_info/retire…
0 votes
FSBOsuccess, Home Seller, 28590
Thu Sep 23, 2010
Unfortunately, business is business. If you find a better deal elsewhere and he can't match or beat it, you are under no obligation to give him anything. Now if you want to do a small gift card or plant, that is nice but you don't have to.

I worked with a mortgage broker for over 7 months as I preparing to enter into the building process. Gave him all my paperwork so he would get an exact picture of my financial situation and he ran a credit report (that did not change except for the better over time). Took me forever to get a GFE from him. I was going to do a USDA mortgage. Red flags began to go up when he would mention in nearly every email about doing an FHA mortgage. The clincher though was when I (1) found another mortgage company with cheaper fees and (2) when he made the comment in one his last emails "I don't know when I last did a USDA mortgage." Now, for someone else that may not bother them, but for me, I wanted someone who knew the USDA process and was batting for me.

I did change companies and while I did feel somewhat bad, business is business.
0 votes
Kylee Roe, Agent, Sacramento, CA
Wed Sep 22, 2010
Annalee,
To me, you've answered your own question. Ok, just my opinion again...but....if the bank mortgage guy can not stay focused on you the full time you are with him, I too would question his ability to professionally see the transaction through. Just my opinion though. Drives me crazy when I'm a client if my service provider has other things to do besides focus on me.

It's super great of you to want to compensate your mortgage broker if you go with the bank, but, at the end of the day, I bet the mortgage broker is the seasoned pro who can get your loan money wired, and close the transaction for you with a minimum of hassle.
0 votes
Sue Archer R…, Agent, Palm Harbor, FL
Wed Sep 22, 2010
Sounds like you're right on target Annalee!
Web Reference:  http://www.suearcher.com
0 votes
Sue Archer R…, Agent, Palm Harbor, FL
Wed Sep 22, 2010
By the way, you don't mention using a buyer agent to represent you on buying the home. The bank owned listing agent normally does not also represent you on the sale so I am assuming you're letting him refer you to one of his team. So again, are you being led, or getting your own representation? Because your buyer's agent should be helping you understand what factors you should consider on selecting the lender offerings, as well as all other factors that would allow you to be fully informed on your purchase.

Good luck Annalee. Your question shows you have class.
Web Reference:  http://www.suearcher.com
0 votes
Kylee Roe, Agent, Sacramento, CA
Wed Sep 22, 2010
You've got good answers here Annalee! I am with Sue and the others that are advising you to check with your current broker, let him match what the bank is offering, or he may be able to dissect the bank's loan scenario for you. In my opinion, I would question a "free" appraisal, and wonder if other closing charges were escalated to cover the appraisal fee, after all the appraiser isn't working for free. Plus are the terms of the loan from the bank, that much better than what the broker has found for you?

At the end of the day, a referral would be great, and dare I suggest an anonymously sent starbucks card?!

You seem pretty smart, so just be sure the bank's loan and offer really is better over the life of the loan, then what your broker has set up for you.
Web Reference:  http://www.kyleeonline.com
0 votes
Sue Archer R…, Agent, Palm Harbor, FL
Wed Sep 22, 2010
A bank owned home listing sometimes offers a free appraisal for using their same bank, but the rates are public rates, and not an incentive (as far as I've ever heard) for using the bank that also owns the home as the one that will finance the new home loan.

You can really use whomever you want. A nice gift would be a nice gesture...but I think you're underestimating the work still to be done in negotiating the loan. Whomever the bank would have you work with, while they're an employee of that bank, does not demonstrate what their experience level is. Will they be as responsive? Keep you as informed along the way? Who knows? A good interest rate is pretty much a given in this market, good service is not. Ask your current lender to 'match' the incentivesm if they mean so much to you.

If it were me, I'd stick with who's already demonstrated good service.
That's just MY opinion.
Web Reference:  http://www.suearcher.com
0 votes
Roswell Moore…, Mortgage Broker Or Lender, Scottsdale, AZ
Wed Sep 22, 2010
Dear Annalee,

I cannot begin to say how fair you are as a person to think of how to compensate your mortgage broker for what they did for you. We should all be so lucky to have such thoughtful clients as yourself.

That said, may I suggest you let him know where you are with the bank owned property, the incentives & the rate you are receiving. I have a feeling he may be able to get very close, if not beat the offer & you get to stay with him to fund your loan.

Good luck on your purchase,
Ros

Roswell Moore, CMPS
Certified Mortgage Planner
480-422-5095 direct

Direct Lender, Mortgage Bank where we originate, process, underwrite and fund our own loans in-house, on time.
Web Reference:  http://www.ezAZloan.com
0 votes
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