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Dyker Heights : Real Estate Advice

  • All49
  • Local Info6
  • Home Buying18
  • Home Selling1
  • Market Conditions2

Activity 39
Fri May 19, 2017
Kathy Burgreen answered:
What house? You did not provide a link or address. Buying a foreclosure is the same as buying a regular house. The difference is most foreclosures in NYC require 100% cash because lenders will not give you a loan. Also most foreclosures require major renovations and repairs. You will need to pay for this and in NYC, contractors are expensive.
You need to work with a realtor BUT most realtors in NYC refuse to work with foreclosures because the time involved is not worth it. The commissions earned is much smaller than buying a regular home.
... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Wed Feb 17, 2016
Claudia Zimmermann asked:
Good Elementary School is a must.
Our budget is $1200-1350 approx.
Please, contact me at clasoria@gmail.com if you have any potential rentals!
0 votes 0 Answers Share Flag
Thu Feb 11, 2016
Zachary Gangemi answered:
I am currently waiting on a call back for the 1268 83rd street foreclosure you have expressed interest in. I do have some other foreclosure purchase opportunities available as well. Please feel free to contact me.

Zachary Gangemi
201 400 0703
zacharygangemi@gmail.com
Rapid Realty
Brooklyn, NY
... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Wed Apr 8, 2015
Jayme Gangone answered:
how many rooms will if u dont have any one renting r still need to rent an need help give me a call 718 - 600 - 3988
0 votes 8 answers Share Flag
Sun Nov 9, 2014
Anna M Brocco answered:
For helpful information see link www.hopstop.com
1 vote 1 answer Share Flag
Mon Aug 4, 2014
Madeline Padovano answered:
Hi Kevinmail17 - no parking
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Wed Jul 16, 2014
Kathryn Lilly answered:
The market has changed so quickly, there are just not that many "foreclosures" or short sales available.
A house that may be in foreclosure; if the seller wants to sell it, can put it on the open market and get a market price for it. They are no longer discounted.
The only way to get a true foreclosure is to go to the auctions, on the Court House steps.
If a seller does go to an agent and say I want/need to sell this quick, the chances are that the Broker will have at least 10 buyers that they can call to pay all cash for it for a quick sale.
Unless of course the mortgage and judgments are more than the house is worth, those are the houses that eventually end up on the Court House steps.
... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Wed Apr 9, 2014
Owen Dublin answered:
Hi,

My name is Owen Dublin and I'm a Realtor with Keller Williams Realty Empire. I'd be happy to help you determine the current market rent for your basement apartment! You may contact me anytime at 267-777-8650 and at owendublin@kw.com. Thank you. ... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Wed Apr 9, 2014
Scott Godzyk answered:
If a buyer closes on it, then it can become their problem. Your lawyer will advise you how serious it is and what the town/city wants to fix the violation and any cost with it. Only the buyer can judge if it is worth the risk. ... more
0 votes 5 answers Share Flag
Wed Apr 9, 2014
Kathryn Lilly answered:
It depends on who is holding the escrow. Is it the sellers attorney, your attorney or the Bank?
If it is either attorney, it will be explained in the escrow agreement between the Attorneys. If the issue is resolved within a specified time, the seller gets the money. If it is not, then the buyer gets the money.
If the Bank is holding the escrow; depending on the Bank and again how the escrow agreement is written. If the problem is not resolved, it will go towards the principal of the mortgage. If the problem is resolved it will be released to which ever party put up the escrow.
But all of this should be explained by your attorney.

Best wishes,
Kathryn Lilly, Broker
Realty on the Greene, LLC
718-858-7600
KLilly@RealtyontheGreene.com
... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Sat Jan 25, 2014
Sam Gold answered:
Good Morning, Lona! There are a lot of rentals available in Dyker Heights. Which one are you asking about?
8 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Sat Dec 28, 2013
Janine Acquafredda answered:
There is one short sale on the market according to the Brooklyn Multiple Listing Service at 79/10.

If you need help buying or selling, feel free to contact me.
Janine Acquafredda
Associate Broker
House-n-Key, Realty of Dyker
8024 13th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11228
(917) 584-7685
nycrealestatepro@yahoo.com
... more
0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Wed Oct 16, 2013
Michael Germanovsky answered:
You can find current map of vacant houses and buildings with other violations at http://www.buildingviolation.com/
0 votes 5 answers Share Flag
Sun Sep 29, 2013
Annamaria Diangelo answered:
Hi Natalia contact me @ 718 757.6992

Thank you
0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Tue Aug 20, 2013
answered:
Rent today; Buy tomorrow. How to convert from Tenant to Homeowner.

When I rented my first apartment in Astoria, I did not want to be a Tenant my whole life and pay my Landlordâ€s mortgage. I longed to become a Homeowner.

That’s why I found my way into the mortgage business in 1989 and soon afterward became a Homeowner. Here are the fundamentals any Tenant should know to prepare to become a Homeowner in the future, no matter when that might be.

• Credit: Establish 3 credit accounts, no more than 5. Pay your bills on time. Keep your balances to no more than 50% of your credit limit. Don’t pay off the accounts in full. Keep balances active for 12-24 months. All of the above will provide both a good credit score and adequate credit history to qualify for a mortgage loan.

• Assets: A basic savings budget isn’t hard to do. Pay your rent first in your budget; then set aside 10% of your income before taxes . Make it a budget priority and you’ll still have money left over for entertainment and restaurants and clothing.

How much money do you need to buy a home? Many buyers spend no more than $25,000 to buy their first homes. There are loan programs with low down payment requirements and many real estate agents negotiate for their Buyers a “Seller’s concession” to include the Buyer’s closing costs (which are HIGH here in New York!) in the price of the home.

• Income: Two years consistent income is the basic requirement for either a salaried individual or a self-employed person. Income from Bonus, Commission, and Overtime is treated differently and is best discussed with your Mortgage Banker.

• Market Survey: it doesn’t hurt to go out and get to know neighborhoods where you might like to buy a home. Visit open houses on Saturdays and Sundays. It’s okay that you’re not yet buying; tell the Realtor at the Open House you’re just beginning your “survey.” You’ll also get to know market prices for different kinds of homes. It’s okay to “window shop” homes on the weekend at Open Houses!

I hope these fundamentals will help you better understand the path to homeownership is a process that, with preparation and dedication, you can move through easily. And if you’re interested in getting Prequalified today to create an Action Plan for your future of Homeownership, call me anytime!

Trevor Curran
NMLS #40140
www.tcurranmortgage.com

*If you thought my answer was helpful, please give me a “Thumbs Up” or “Best Answer.” Thanks!
... more
1 vote 7 answers Share Flag
Tue Aug 20, 2013
answered:
Rent today; Buy tomorrow. How to convert from Tenant to Homeowner.

When I rented my first apartment in Astoria, I did not want to be a Tenant my whole life and pay my Landlordâ€s mortgage. I longed to become a Homeowner.

That’s why I found my way into the mortgage business in 1989 and soon afterward became a Homeowner. Here are the fundamentals any Tenant should know to prepare to become a Homeowner in the future, no matter when that might be.

• Credit: Establish 3 credit accounts, no more than 5. Pay your bills on time. Keep your balances to no more than 50% of your credit limit. Don’t pay off the accounts in full. Keep balances active for 12-24 months. All of the above will provide both a good credit score and adequate credit history to qualify for a mortgage loan.

• Assets: A basic savings budget isn’t hard to do. Pay your rent first in your budget; then set aside 10% of your income before taxes . Make it a budget priority and you’ll still have money left over for entertainment and restaurants and clothing.

How much money do you need to buy a home? Many buyers spend no more than $25,000 to buy their first homes. There are loan programs with low down payment requirements and many real estate agents negotiate for their Buyers a “Seller’s concession” to include the Buyer’s closing costs (which are HIGH here in New York!) in the price of the home.

• Income: Two years consistent income is the basic requirement for either a salaried individual or a self-employed person. Income from Bonus, Commission, and Overtime is treated differently and is best discussed with your Mortgage Banker.

• Market Survey: it doesn’t hurt to go out and get to know neighborhoods where you might like to buy a home. Visit open houses on Saturdays and Sundays. It’s okay that you’re not yet buying; tell the Realtor at the Open House you’re just beginning your “survey.” You’ll also get to know market prices for different kinds of homes. It’s okay to “window shop” homes on the weekend at Open Houses!

I hope these fundamentals will help you better understand the path to homeownership is a process that, with preparation and dedication, you can move through easily. And if you’re interested in getting Prequalified today to create an Action Plan for your future of Homeownership, call me anytime!

Trevor Curran
NMLS #40140
www.tcurranmortgage.com

*If you thought my answer was helpful, please give me a “Thumbs Up” or “Best Answer.” Thanks!
... more
0 votes 5 answers Share Flag
Tue Aug 20, 2013
answered:
Rent today; Buy tomorrow. How to convert from Tenant to Homeowner.

When I rented my first apartment in Astoria, I did not want to be a Tenant my whole life and pay my Landlordâ€s mortgage. I longed to become a Homeowner.

That’s why I found my way into the mortgage business in 1989 and soon afterward became a Homeowner. Here are the fundamentals any Tenant should know to prepare to become a Homeowner in the future, no matter when that might be.

• Credit: Establish 3 credit accounts, no more than 5. Pay your bills on time. Keep your balances to no more than 50% of your credit limit. Don’t pay off the accounts in full. Keep balances active for 12-24 months. All of the above will provide both a good credit score and adequate credit history to qualify for a mortgage loan.

• Assets: A basic savings budget isn’t hard to do. Pay your rent first in your budget; then set aside 10% of your income before taxes . Make it a budget priority and you’ll still have money left over for entertainment and restaurants and clothing.

How much money do you need to buy a home? Many buyers spend no more than $25,000 to buy their first homes. There are loan programs with low down payment requirements and many real estate agents negotiate for their Buyers a “Seller’s concession” to include the Buyer’s closing costs (which are HIGH here in New York!) in the price of the home.

• Income: Two years consistent income is the basic requirement for either a salaried individual or a self-employed person. Income from Bonus, Commission, and Overtime is treated differently and is best discussed with your Mortgage Banker.

• Market Survey: it doesn’t hurt to go out and get to know neighborhoods where you might like to buy a home. Visit open houses on Saturdays and Sundays. It’s okay that you’re not yet buying; tell the Realtor at the Open House you’re just beginning your “survey.” You’ll also get to know market prices for different kinds of homes. It’s okay to “window shop” homes on the weekend at Open Houses!

I hope these fundamentals will help you better understand the path to homeownership is a process that, with preparation and dedication, you can move through easily. And if you’re interested in getting Prequalified today to create an Action Plan for your future of Homeownership, call me anytime!

Trevor Curran
NMLS #40140
www.tcurranmortgage.com

*If you thought my answer was helpful, please give me a “Thumbs Up” or “Best Answer.” Thanks!
... more
0 votes 5 answers Share Flag
Tue Aug 20, 2013
answered:
Rent today; Buy tomorrow. How to convert from Tenant to Homeowner.

When I rented my first apartment in Astoria, I did not want to be a Tenant my whole life and pay my Landlordâ€s mortgage. I longed to become a Homeowner.

That’s why I found my way into the mortgage business in 1989 and soon afterward became a Homeowner. Here are the fundamentals any Tenant should know to prepare to become a Homeowner in the future, no matter when that might be.

• Credit: Establish 3 credit accounts, no more than 5. Pay your bills on time. Keep your balances to no more than 50% of your credit limit. Don’t pay off the accounts in full. Keep balances active for 12-24 months. All of the above will provide both a good credit score and adequate credit history to qualify for a mortgage loan.

• Assets: A basic savings budget isn’t hard to do. Pay your rent first in your budget; then set aside 10% of your income before taxes . Make it a budget priority and you’ll still have money left over for entertainment and restaurants and clothing.

How much money do you need to buy a home? Many buyers spend no more than $25,000 to buy their first homes. There are loan programs with low down payment requirements and many real estate agents negotiate for their Buyers a “Seller’s concession” to include the Buyer’s closing costs (which are HIGH here in New York!) in the price of the home.

• Income: Two years consistent income is the basic requirement for either a salaried individual or a self-employed person. Income from Bonus, Commission, and Overtime is treated differently and is best discussed with your Mortgage Banker.

• Market Survey: it doesn’t hurt to go out and get to know neighborhoods where you might like to buy a home. Visit open houses on Saturdays and Sundays. It’s okay that you’re not yet buying; tell the Realtor at the Open House you’re just beginning your “survey.” You’ll also get to know market prices for different kinds of homes. It’s okay to “window shop” homes on the weekend at Open Houses!

I hope these fundamentals will help you better understand the path to homeownership is a process that, with preparation and dedication, you can move through easily. And if you’re interested in getting Prequalified today to create an Action Plan for your future of Homeownership, call me anytime!

Trevor Curran
NMLS #40140
www.tcurranmortgage.com

*If you thought my answer was helpful, please give me a “Thumbs Up” or “Best Answer.” Thanks!
... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Mon Jul 15, 2013
Mitchell Feldman answered:
Dear CT1988:

In the end it is like 6 of one and half a dozen of the other. For the most part is doesn't make a big difference. Some people prefer a garage and others will prefer a bigger backyard. If you want the garage you can always try to get a permit and rebuild the garage. Most people use their garage for storage these days and besides, if you have a shared driveway you would still be able to park in your backyard even if the garage is not there.

Sincerely,
Mitchell S. Feldman
Associate Broker/ Director of Sales
Madison Estates & Properties, Inc.
Office: (718) 645-1665/ Cell: (917) 805-0783
Email: MitchellSFeldman@aol.com
... more
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