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Bethesda : Real Estate Advice

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  • Local Info15
  • Home Buying41
  • Home Selling2
  • Market Conditions11

Activity 146
Sun Nov 19, 2017
Phil34894 answered:
When you say the drain system, if you mean the drain going to the cesspool, septic tank, or the sewer, then these systems would have to be in working condition for the buyer to get financing. If the seller wants to sell to someone to someone who will need financing then they will need to get the cesspool / septic system working. ... more
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Tue Nov 7, 2017
Chelsea Backler asked:
My husband and I are potentially relocating to the Bethesda area as I am currently in the process of interviewing with NIH. I have been searching for rental properties but am curious if…
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Fri Oct 6, 2017
Alan May answered:
I don't know what the rules are in Kentucky. In Illinois, there is no such law that requires a radon test. And just because you're releasing the "contingency" doesn't mean you can't conduct a radon test anyway. It only means that if you have a high-finding, you can't cancel the contract based on that finding.

Radon testing will vary day to day. And that's one of the problems with Radon tests. They are only a snapshot in time. One test might register 3.1, and the following week, it might register 1.5. The best way to really determine if you have a radon problem is to put a test in place for several months... and over time you'll be able to get an "average". Obviously, a 3-month test would be for your information only... after you've taken possession. Radon remediation (if you end up with a high-finding) is inexpensive and easy to put in place.

Good luck.
... more
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Wed Sep 20, 2017
Kathy Burgreen answered:
Don't do it. You will regret it. I'm a former realtor and currently VP of my HOA so I speak with experience. You have several issues / challenges:

Property taxes - if you convert your home to 2 bedrooms, you need to verify with your county tax assessor if there will be an increase in taxes. You will need to get a permit and the county will know about it.

Realtors and buyers - each bedroom needs to fit a bed, clothes bureau, nightstand, desk? and floor space to walk around. Will both bedrooms have enough space for this? I don't think so. You need to understand that buyers want "normal" size bedrooms - where they are not squeezed between furniture to get to where they need to. If buyers feel squeezed between furniture, they will reject your condo. By the way, buyers have more furniture than you think, so if your intention is to minimize the furniture - think again. Buyers will envision your bedroom with THEIR furniture in it AND their furniture needs to fit INSIDE the bedrooms.

Appraisals - you need to contact a few appraisers and ask them how they would evaluate your condo if you convert it. At least you will know before you start.

HOA approval - sorry but you cannot do any construction projects without HOA approval. The HOA is VERY concerned with damage to hallways, elevators, debris, whether contractors are licensed and insured, etc. Briefly, if the HOA discovers any damage to the condo complex, they will penalize you.
... more
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Thu Nov 17, 2016
Jonathan Lahey answered:
Tue Sep 27, 2016
Amelia Robinette answered:
are you asking after the fact? if you're under contract, it's too late to ask for this info.

Your agent should have gathered the information for you during your negotiations.
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Tue Sep 27, 2016
Amelia Robinette answered:
Read your agreement with the home inspection, it will tell you if expecting them to identify mold is in their scope.

You should have had a separate mold inspection if mold is important to you. ... more
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Mon Sep 5, 2016
Laurabholmes asked:
will be moving from overseas at Easter time, I am doing some research on areas but realistically how long should before hand should I be engaging agents?
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Tue Aug 23, 2016
Nidhi asked:
5500 Friendship Blvd. (1BR and 1.5 Bath)
9 pictures
listed for $1800
Chevy Chase, MD
Please delete this listing. Thanks.
0 votes 0 Answers Share Flag
Tue Aug 2, 2016
Markzjordanz answered:
No credit check, 1 percent interest 30 year fixed, 4.5 proof of funds in which u can use vet status or 401k, the property has to be appraised at 350 k and up. 30 day close, 8037576801 u would pay less buying a home ... more
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Sat Apr 9, 2016
amy.mistretta answered:
Are you still planning to rent out your 3BD/2BA on July 1st? Is this listing in the Ashburton school district by chance? We are looking to move on June 30th or shortly thereafter.
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Sat Feb 27, 2016
Ascotan answered:
Montgomery county laws are extremely confusing on the matter. Here's my understanding.

There are multiple types of 'agents' that are recognized by the county. There is an 'administrative' agent (who is basically a real estate agent) who's job was to find a tenant for the property and process paperwork, but who will not manage the property. There is a 'management agent', who acts as the representative of the landord to manage the property. Then there is a 'legal agent' who's job is to provide 'service of process'.

The requirement for a legal agent is to provide 'service of process'. This is more commonly called a 'registered agent'. (google it) This is usually done for businesses. Basically if the county wants to track you down to 'serve' you with a court summons (because you are being sued by a tenant), the county will deliver that summons to the 'legal agent' who provides 'service of process' for that property.

To serve as the legal agent, you need to
1. Sign the rental licensing document and be registered with the county as the legal agent for the property.
2. Handle all communication between the county and the owner (such as rental licensing renewals) or court summons.

My understanding is that is the extent of it.
... more
0 votes 6 answers Share Flag
Tue Feb 16, 2016
Maureenreed.burke asked:
Fri Jan 1, 2016
Jolinluo6000 answered:
Hey, Jezebelvr. I highly recommend you a excellent affordable apartment in bethesda.
The detailed information can be seen in website:http://www.aldonmanagement.com/page/16742~283213/The-Glens-on-Battery-Lane
I rent a one bed room apartment for over a year, it is quite,clean and comfortable.
The model I rent is the renovated one in the four floor.
Hope this can help.
... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Fri Dec 4, 2015
Dan Tabit answered:
SJ,
In a competitive situation, if everything else is equal, the buyer with the larger down payment may be preferred by a seller due to greater security in getting the loan approved. VA may also require the seller to complete any issues discovered in the inspection that might be health or safety related before they would fund the loan.
When you are one of 2 or more bids, this puts you at a competitive disadvantage. How you decide to proceed is up to you, but that has been my experience.
Now, as to the inspector. I know that I've been on hundreds of inspections and like many professions there are some that are much better than others. I suggest my recommended inspector to my clients because I know they do a very comprehensive job, provide a quality report, use state of the art technology and are trained in it's operation.
I also tell my inspectors to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. If it's a bad house, I'm the first one to want to kill the deal and find a better one, or to suggest we make the demands required to protect my buyer if we do proceed.
I don't know who your agent is, what their morals or ethics are, but a good one will put your interests above their own in finding the right house, using the right loan to be competitive and using the best vendors to ensure all goes well.
... more
1 vote 1 answer Share Flag
Sat Nov 21, 2015
FA answered:
It is a nice place for anyone, I think. We lived there for over a year and found it to be a good place, not too close to downtown but close enough. There was a mix of groups, including a few reaching or at retirement age. It has changed since 2011 and there are more options now in that area for apartments. Best thing is to ask them about the ratio of people in age groups and I am sure they will share. However, we found mostly professionals (couples, singles, and a few families) who work close to or in Bethesda and DC area. You should not be worried about whether it is nice place for elderly especially if elderly are active. Management is good for most part and proactive but thats what you are paying for :) ... more
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