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Bensonhurst : Real Estate Advice

  • All83
  • Local Info4
  • Home Buying10
  • Home Selling5
  • Market Conditions5

Activity 60
Tue Mar 21, 2017
Kathy Burgreen answered:
You don't have to. You should explore nearby suburbs (Nassau County). Housing is cheaper and easy commute to Manhattan. Co-op and condo buildings do not allow Section 8 tenants. Or you could buy a house. ... more
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Fri Nov 4, 2016
Kathy Burgreen answered:
Yes I know it's difficult and yes, realtors will ignore you. You need to understand that property management companies and landlords are operating a business. Therefore, they want tenants who can pay full market rent which is more than what Section 8 pays.

Example: a 2 bedroom in Brooklyn rents for $4,000./month. Section 8 pays $1268./month. Who will pay the difference of $2,732./month to the landlord? You don't have the money to pay. Landlords are not going to take a loss and lose $2,732./month to a tenant with Section 8. They will just reject you and wait for a tenant who can afford $4,000./month. This is the landlord's profit. Just because you have Section 8 doesn't mean the landlords have to accept it. They can take Section 8 but they also want you to pay $2,732,/month extra. Oh and Section 8 refuses their clients to pay a penny extra - part of the rules.

As for realtors - yes Section 8 will pay their commission. BUT the commission paid is very small and realtors in NYC can earn much more working with buyers and sellers and even high cost renters. For the time involved and the expenses, working with Section 8 clients is not worth it. There is no money to be made.
... more
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Thu Aug 25, 2016
Hbrittain answered:
Bad credit doesn't automatically mean you can't rent a property. Surely landlords not very happy about bad credit score or broken lease, but not only you go through this problem. Some owners might still see a good prospects for you. Try to search property online. I personally like Rentberry rental service. ... more
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Wed Sep 2, 2015
Andy wong asked:
Mon Apr 13, 2015
lewisremington19 answered:
It would depend on the kind of system that is in the apartment. There are some that have a really efficient heat and water system, and some that won't be quite as efficient. I would recommend asking the landlord of whatever apartments you are looking at about what the average per month is. That will be more accurate than anything else.
http://www.solaplumb.com.au
... more
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Fri Jul 4, 2014
Lolop answered:
Sure. Check no fee listings on Craigslist.
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Fri Jun 6, 2014
Anna M Brocco answered:
See link for helpul information www.hopstop.com
2 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Wed May 14, 2014
Sam Gold answered:
Fri Feb 21, 2014
Nosirov Alisher answered:
i called about all broker apartments but they are not any sense help me find an apartment in the area of the( bay pkwy) forgive not only expensive thanks a lot
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Mon Feb 17, 2014
Frank Spaulding-Bey answered:
$200k is a tough number to meet unless you are an all cash buyer looking to do some renovation work. Give me a call as Fillmore Realty is number one in Brooklyn and we may have something in our inventory that may meet your requirements at present. 347-732-7408 ... more
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Mon Feb 17, 2014
Frank Spaulding-Bey answered:
Please call me at 347-732-7408 as Fillmore Realty is number one in Brooklyn and I have one for you with in that criteria you are looking for. 347-732-7408
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Sun Jan 5, 2014
Rhonda Holt answered:
Hello, it is usually the rule for the seller to pay the agent the buyer is working with unless you specify it in your advertising and to buyers you communicate with. But it's usually better to have an agent represent a buyer because they act as the middle man for doing negotiations on price and repairs, helping the buyer go through the mortgage process and keeping them patient and to keep you up to date on the buyer. Also the agent acts as the manager to make sure everyone in the deal is doing their job and to come up with solutions to any problems that can jeopardize the deal. Also the agent will manage dealings with the bank, inspectors, appraisers, and attorneys and more.

So it's smart to have an agent to manage things on your behalf or on the buyer's behalf to keep things moving since there are so many people involved in a deal that can stop you from getting to the closing table. Paying 3% or more is not much to pay if your home is going to sell.

If I can help you with any other questions feel free to contact me.
... more
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Fri Dec 13, 2013
Kathryn Lilly answered:
Most landlords list apartments for the rent that they know the market will bare.
Also many landlords consider a tenant that wants to negotiate right from the get go is going to want to be negotiating everything all the way through their tenancy / lease and do not want negotiators as tenants. They also want tenants that can comfortably afford to pay the rent, so would question why are you looking at apartments that you cannot afford? Or do not want to pay for?
When "negotiating" you must always keep in mind the other side of the equation and how it is perceived.
Landlords like a tenant to appreciate the appreciate the apartment and the value of the apartment. Look at everything in the same neighborhood and if you still want to negotiate because you think it is honestly over priced, the agent will probably be able to do something, but not likely in this market. Although that said December/January are the slowest months for rentals, but still landlords will be reluctant to tie themselves to a long lease at a reduced rent. They are more likely to offer something like if the rent is received before the 1st of the month they will accept a reduced rent of say $100.00 off.
Yours,
Kathryn Lilly, Broker
Realty on the Greene, LLC
718-858-7600
KLilly@RealtyontheGreene.com
... more
1 vote 3 answers Share Flag
Wed Dec 11, 2013
Mitchell Feldman answered:
Dear Nancy,

You can go to the web site www.HopStop.com to get subway, bus and/or walking directions, along with approximate times of commute to and from anywhere in the city.

Sincerely,
Mitchell S. Feldman
Associate Broker/ Director of Sales/ e-Pro Realtor
Fillmore Real Estate
Office: (718) 252-2000/ Cell: (917) 805-0783
Email: MitchellSFeldman@aol.com
... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Fri Oct 25, 2013
Nick Sakalis answered:
If its through an Agent/Broker most likely there is a fee.
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Tue Aug 20, 2013
answered:
Rent today; Buy tomorrow. How to convert from Tenant to Homeowner.

When I rented my first apartment in Astoria, I did not want to be a Tenant my whole life and pay my Landlordâ€s mortgage. I longed to become a Homeowner.

That’s why I found my way into the mortgage business in 1989 and soon afterward became a Homeowner. Here are the fundamentals any Tenant should know to prepare to become a Homeowner in the future, no matter when that might be.

• Credit: Establish 3 credit accounts, no more than 5. Pay your bills on time. Keep your balances to no more than 50% of your credit limit. Don’t pay off the accounts in full. Keep balances active for 12-24 months. All of the above will provide both a good credit score and adequate credit history to qualify for a mortgage loan.

• Assets: A basic savings budget isn’t hard to do. Pay your rent first in your budget; then set aside 10% of your income before taxes . Make it a budget priority and you’ll still have money left over for entertainment and restaurants and clothing.

How much money do you need to buy a home? Many buyers spend no more than $25,000 to buy their first homes. There are loan programs with low down payment requirements and many real estate agents negotiate for their Buyers a “Seller’s concession” to include the Buyer’s closing costs (which are HIGH here in New York!) in the price of the home.

• Income: Two years consistent income is the basic requirement for either a salaried individual or a self-employed person. Income from Bonus, Commission, and Overtime is treated differently and is best discussed with your Mortgage Banker.

• Market Survey: it doesn’t hurt to go out and get to know neighborhoods where you might like to buy a home. Visit open houses on Saturdays and Sundays. It’s okay that you’re not yet buying; tell the Realtor at the Open House you’re just beginning your “survey.” You’ll also get to know market prices for different kinds of homes. It’s okay to “window shop” homes on the weekend at Open Houses!

I hope these fundamentals will help you better understand the path to homeownership is a process that, with preparation and dedication, you can move through easily. And if you’re interested in getting Prequalified today to create an Action Plan for your future of Homeownership, call me anytime!

Trevor Curran
NMLS #40140
www.tcurranmortgage.com

*If you thought my answer was helpful, please give me a “Thumbs Up” or “Best Answer.” Thanks!
... more
0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Tue Aug 20, 2013
answered:
Rent today; Buy tomorrow. How to convert from Tenant to Homeowner.

When I rented my first apartment in Astoria, I did not want to be a Tenant my whole life and pay my Landlordâ€s mortgage. I longed to become a Homeowner.

That’s why I found my way into the mortgage business in 1989 and soon afterward became a Homeowner. Here are the fundamentals any Tenant should know to prepare to become a Homeowner in the future, no matter when that might be.

• Credit: Establish 3 credit accounts, no more than 5. Pay your bills on time. Keep your balances to no more than 50% of your credit limit. Don’t pay off the accounts in full. Keep balances active for 12-24 months. All of the above will provide both a good credit score and adequate credit history to qualify for a mortgage loan.

• Assets: A basic savings budget isn’t hard to do. Pay your rent first in your budget; then set aside 10% of your income before taxes . Make it a budget priority and you’ll still have money left over for entertainment and restaurants and clothing.

How much money do you need to buy a home? Many buyers spend no more than $25,000 to buy their first homes. There are loan programs with low down payment requirements and many real estate agents negotiate for their Buyers a “Seller’s concession” to include the Buyer’s closing costs (which are HIGH here in New York!) in the price of the home.

• Income: Two years consistent income is the basic requirement for either a salaried individual or a self-employed person. Income from Bonus, Commission, and Overtime is treated differently and is best discussed with your Mortgage Banker.

• Market Survey: it doesn’t hurt to go out and get to know neighborhoods where you might like to buy a home. Visit open houses on Saturdays and Sundays. It’s okay that you’re not yet buying; tell the Realtor at the Open House you’re just beginning your “survey.” You’ll also get to know market prices for different kinds of homes. It’s okay to “window shop” homes on the weekend at Open Houses!

I hope these fundamentals will help you better understand the path to homeownership is a process that, with preparation and dedication, you can move through easily. And if you’re interested in getting Prequalified today to create an Action Plan for your future of Homeownership, call me anytime!

Trevor Curran
NMLS #40140
www.tcurranmortgage.com

*If you thought my answer was helpful, please give me a “Thumbs Up” or “Best Answer.” Thanks!
... more
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