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Asked by Rlwarmack1, Cypress, TX Fri Feb 15, 2013

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Answers

13
Claudia J. P…, Agent, Houston, TX
Sat Feb 16, 2013
I would love to talk to you about your future and opportunity in Real Estate immediately!

Claudia J Price
Top Producer
Keller Williams Realty
832-377-9256
claudia@claudiajprice.com
1 vote
Fantastic!!
Flag Sat Feb 16, 2013
I've sent you an email
Flag Sat Feb 16, 2013
Thank you so much ill send you an email tomorrow
Flag Sat Feb 16, 2013
Bruce Lynn, Agent, Coppell, TX
Fri Mar 15, 2013
Champions is great.

As others have said I would read Gary Keller's MREA book...and the new one "The One Thing".

If you want to interview with KW normally we can get you one of the books when you interview.

Old school books are Tom Hopkins "How to Master the Art of Listing and Selling Real Estate"

If you have time on March 26th, we'd like you to attend the event surrounding the book "The One Thing."
It is a 4 hour class and one of the best I've ever attended.
0 votes
Al Geffon, Agent, Houston, TX
Tue Feb 19, 2013
I would look at Gary Keller's "The Millionaire Real Estate Agent," but with a grain of salt (a shaker is more like it). He's the co-founder of Keller Williams, puts the industry in perspective, and defines the duties and objectives of the Realtor ... to paraphrase, you're not in the real estate business; you're in the lead-generation business. The title is misleading ... it's not as if everyone who reads the book will ascend to that level, or even come close. About 20% of new agents are still in the business after two years. But he does make some excellent points. As long as you take it for what it is, you'll benefit from reading it.
Web Reference:  http://www.har.com/algeffon
0 votes
Rlwarmack1, , Cypress, TX
Mon Feb 18, 2013
Are there any good real-estate books I should read?
0 votes
Al Geffon, Agent, Houston, TX
Mon Feb 18, 2013
A "top agent" didn't achieve that status by devoting an inordinate amount of time to teaching a recruit how the business works. There's always a new client to pursue, a listing presentation to prepare, a seller whose feathers have been ruffled by negative feedback, a contract or two to negotiate, a class I want to (or must) take, previewing new listings, time set aside to show property ... that's how I earn my living, and I need to stay on top of everything in this incredibly competitive field. Nobody mentored me, and the school of hard knocks was a great teacher.

What discretionary time I do have is spent as far away from real estate as possible, lest it consume my every waking moment (a definite possibility in this industry). I'm always happy to answer any questions, have lunch with a freshman agent, look over paperwork, etc. But to assume the responsibility of mentoring someone just out of real estate school is something I'm unwilling to do. So many agencies offer hours and hours of training ... it's how I learned.

I really don't wish to seem callous, but I have a reputation of personal service to my clients that I need to maintain, as well as the pursuit of new business ... that's where my emphasis lies.

Al Geffon
(713) 213-6350
al@geffon.net
Web Reference:  http://www.har.com/algeffon
0 votes
D PCC, Agent, xxxxx, IA
Sun Feb 17, 2013
Try to align yourself with a top agent who is willing to take you under wing. That, is the absolutely best way to learn your craft. This is an extremely committed profession. It is a lifelong learning process.
0 votes
Phyllis McAr…, Agent, San mateo, CA
Sat Feb 16, 2013
Congrats on your desision! all of the answers are right on target. I work with a couple of 20something year olds and although I'm considered a (gulp) baby boomer....it is amazing how I can learn new things from them.

I like Larry Tollen's answer, because it's true that some "old timers" won't take you seriously, but don't let that deter you,

You are exactly what this industry needs. Many of my buyer/clients are in their 20's and are way smarter than I was when I was that age.

BEST of luck, and don't give up!
0 votes
Thank you
Flag Sun Feb 17, 2013
- -, Other Pro, Dallas, TX
Sat Feb 16, 2013
As two others have stated, definitely Keller Williams. You have access to so much training and knowledge the only way you will not succeed is if you don't do the work.
0 votes
Thank you
Flag Sat Feb 16, 2013
John Souerbry, Agent, Fairfield, CA
Sat Feb 16, 2013
I agree with Larry Tollen in NC, find a mentor who has 3 things: 1) experience 2) teaching ability 3) real work for you to do. The biggest difference between training and mentoring is that mentoring should be hands-on all the time - you learn by doing. Run from any broker who offers training - that's for monkeys.
It shouldn't matter what brokerage your mentor works for, you will probably change brokerages several times in your career anyway. Just find one who you are compatible with and who has work that you can get started on right away.
0 votes
Mark H Rogers, Agent, Houston, TX
Sat Feb 16, 2013
I would recommend Keller Williams Metropolitan in the Galleria.
0 votes
Al Geffon, Agent, Houston, TX
Sat Feb 16, 2013
Champions has been around for years and has an excellent reputation. The immediate objective, of course, is to pass the licensing exam ... hardly a slam-dunk. There's generally a prep course geared to the test ... take it.

Going to open houses isn't your best option, since the agents won't have time to speak with you at length. They'll be concentrating on the people touring the places, either as buyers or, more likely, potential new clients. Very few properties are actually sold as the direct result of attendance at open houses. Agents use them primarily as a vehicle to generate new business.

Several firms regularly stage "career nights." By all means, attend them. Call the local offices to obtain the schedules. All of them promise you the opportunity to earn a considerable income (emphasis on "opportunity") ... but you'll likely find the best fit by talking with the agents who work there. It's a very personal business on many levels. Don't be discouraged if it takes several interviews for you to be sponsored ... handling rejection is a major component in this line of work; get used to it.

You'll also need some financial resources, since you're paid on commission (split with the sponsoring brokerage ... can be anywhere from 30% to 50%), and there's generally a monthly "desk charge." This can vary widely, and may or may not include certain items such as E&O (errors and omissions) insurance. Some agencies have outstanding training available for little or no cost ... take advantage of everything you can. It will likely be several months before you see a check. I've reached the point at which I'm now affiliated with a firm that requires only a small fee for each transaction ... I get to keep 100% of what I earn, but it took me years to get there. I am the brand, not my sponsoring agency. But at this neophyte stage of your career, you need all the support you can get.

The business (yes, it is that) is comprised of far more than riding around and showing nice homes, or holding a property open for a couple of hours on a Sunday. While you'll be utilizing all the technological advances, and spending considerable time in front of a computer, real estate is personal, and there is absolutely no substitute for one-on-one contact and old-fashioned hard work. The dropout rate is incredibly high, and the odds of your succeeding are stacked against you ... it's something you need to understand going in. Until you're established, your compensation could well be in the range of minimum wage ... or less ... when factoring in the hours you spend on work-related activities. It is not a side job ... you need to devote as much time and effort as you can to learning and doing.

Of course, it does have its rewards, but instant gratification is not one of them. I love what I do, and earn a substantial living ("earn" being the operative term), despite the setbacks and speed bumps (often roadblocks) ... I've come to expect them in every transaction, and am usually correct. You'll know soon enough if it's the right career for you. I wish you well.

Regards ...

Al Geffon
(713) 213-6350
al@geffon.net
Web Reference:  http://www.har.com/algeffon
0 votes
Becky Griffin, Agent, Housto, TX
Sat Feb 16, 2013
I would love to share my experiences as a new agent with you. Email me at beckysellstx@gmail.com.
0 votes
My NC Homes…, Agent, Chapel Hill, NC
Sat Feb 16, 2013
The best advice I can offer you is to look for someone who has been in the business a decade or more and have them mentor you and help you get started once you have a license. At 24 you may find that many adults struggle to take you seriously and quite honestly they should have reservations about allowing a 24 year old to offer them advice on what for most is the single largest transaction they'll ever make. Having a mentor will among other things immediately add some "gravitas" and allow you to overcome any reticence buyers or sellers may have.

You should know that 80% of all new Realtors don't make it two years. You should know the average Reatlor in the country earns approximately $40,000 before taxes or expenses. On the other hand if you work hard and are prepared to invest the necessary time and money into your business you can definitely earn a solid six figure income but ti won't be easy and finding someone to mentor you will increase your chance of success.

I wish you the best of luck.
0 votes
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