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98021 : Real Estate Advice

  • All16
  • Local Info1
  • Home Buying9
  • Home Selling1
  • Market Conditions0

Activity 12
Thu Jun 9, 2016
Kary Krismer answered:
Well technically yes, and although I'm not familiar with the listing agreements in the Spokane area I would guess that your listing agreement consents to their acting as a "dual agent." But let's back up . . .

Unless your agent also has a signed buyer's agency agreement with the buyer, your agent would remain just your agent and the buyer would be unrepresented. If they did have such an agreement (very unlikely) then they would be a dual agent. In the latter case they would be more of a facilitator because they wouldn't be able to take any action detrimental to either party. Google RCW 18.86.060.

In neither case would they be allowed to convince a buyer to make a low offer on your house. If they remain just your agent they should be representing your interests. If they are a dual agent, doing so would be detrimental to your interests.

Finally, note that it's the buyer who decides what they are going to offer. If you received a low offer from a buyer through your agent, it's very likely that's what the buyer wanted to offer.
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Thu Jun 9, 2016
Kary Krismer answered:
Well technically yes, and although I'm not familiar with the listing agreements in the Spokane area I would guess that your listing agreement consents to their acting as a "dual agent." But let's back up . . .

Unless your agent also has a signed buyer's agency agreement with the buyer, your agent would remain just your agent and the buyer would be unrepresented. If they did have such an agreement (very unlikely) then they would be a dual agent. In the latter case they would be more of a facilitator because they wouldn't be able to take any action detrimental to either party. Google RCW 18.86.060.

In neither case would they be allowed to convince a buyer to make a low offer on your house. If they remain just your agent they should be representing your interests. If they are a dual agent, doing so would be detrimental to your interests.

Finally, note that it's the buyer who decides what they are going to offer. If you received a low offer from a buyer through your agent, it's very likely that's what the buyer wanted to offer.
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Thu May 7, 2015
Kevin Zellmer answered:
Just wanted to check in and see how your real estate investment and goals have turned out? Have you sold your home or have your rented/ Curious how you decided on the process and if you reinvested into real estate and used the 1031 exchange if needed ... more
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Thu May 7, 2015
Kevin Zellmer answered:
You have selected a great area for your new home. Though 228th St Se is a busy street you may consider other possibilities within a small radius.

Let me recommend that you search within a city code that I can provide through the NWMLS. In addition there are many new home communities being built within 228 all the way down to the north side of Woodinville. Also you may want to look a bit north and east as Mill Creek/Bothell is a tremendous area. If you haven't found that perfect home please consider me to assist with your home search and list your current home.

Hope this helps
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Sat Nov 15, 2014
Kary Krismer answered:
Form 22EF, which I have never ever seen used, is another form which would allow a seller to back out if a buyer didn't meet a deadline. Yet another reason to consult an attorney--so that they can review your particular contract. ... more
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Thu Nov 13, 2014
Dan Tabit answered:
Mehta,
A commission rebate can be used for whatever your lender accepts. Lenders control where funds go more than other factors. Typically closing costs are the best use. All these funds need to be disclosed on the Settlement statement and clearly accounted for. ... more
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Fri Jun 6, 2014
Charu Ghadge answered:
Depends on many factors...inside upgrades, location of lot, elevation of the home, maintenance of home.
Best guides are you and your agent with previewing of your neighborhood.
0 votes 10 answers Share Flag
Tue Sep 10, 2013
Justin J Kim answered:
Centex always provide my clients with great service and they are very prompt. They are a National Builder with great reputation. They don't build the most expensive homes but they are great at what they do in their price point. You get more for your money here! ... more
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Wed Jun 6, 2012
Joe Jonart answered:
I am new to Trulia. Did you get this figured out. There are so many more options these days. I have a network of professionals, from Attorney's, to CPA's, to Real Estate Guru's who can help.
Call 206.910.2247 and leave a message.
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Sat May 23, 2009
Luke Allison answered:
From a fee perspective it is not horrible expense by any stretch of the imagination. BUT, that rate is AWESOME - nobody is really offering that right now without paying a lot of discount points. I would assume that he is using some of those fees to pay down your rate. I would highly advise you to get a lock-in agreement NOW. You should protect that rate and make sure that your fees will not change.

If you go to lock that loan and you find out that your rate/fees are much different then I would walk from him because my bet would be that he lied to you about what he could get you simply to get your business.

If you lock and get a fee sheet with everything verified, then yu have a very good loan.
Good Luck
Luke Allison
Bank of America Home Loans
828-777-8828
luke.allison@bankofamerica.com
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Sat May 23, 2009
Chuck Kabis, MRA, CMC answered:
I don't charge an origination fee. and i do not think any origination fee is reasonable, since most brokers /bankers get paid on the back end of the deal from the lender by charging you a higher rate than the actual -0- point or "par" rate.

If you are "buying down " the rate, you will PAY POINTS to get a rate lower than the "par" rate.

Just because it "standard" practice in some states to charge an origination fee, does not make it right or reasonable.

demand an origination agreement and a good faith estimate, along with a truth in lending statement
and those documents will tell you what you are actually being charged. Check the APR on the truth in lending statement.
If it is not almost exactly the interest rate shown on the loan, your getting charged fees over and above the rate you agreed to in the first place.

As long as you have a clear picture of what you are being charged, you can make the choice to move forward or not..
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Sun May 17, 2009
Emmanuel Scanlan answered:
Hello William,

As a person who has had dealings as a buyer with a seller falsifying a disclosure report here is my two cents. It is not legal advice and you should have it verified.

I would have my Agent draft a written request for all of the items you wish to be repaired. In the written request make references to the specific wording in the inspection report by page number in the report only. Also in that same document make a specific remark that the inspection report is attached to the request. In the request also note that you want a WRITTEN response to your request. Then send that request and the FULL inspection report to the seller's Agent/Seller. At that point the seller now has the entire report and not just a specific section with your requested items. Since it has already been verified that they must disclose what they know they now know everything that was found in the inspection. If other items are on the report are items that must be disclosed, but you were not interested in having them repaired, then they are now on notice for those as well. If you do not purchase the home, for whatever reason, then the next buyer is potentially protected from non-disclosure.

Good luck on the home buying process.

Emmanuel J. Scanlan
PS Inspection & Property Services LLC
www.psinspection.com
214-418-4366 (cell)
TREC License # 7593
International Code Council, Residential Combination Inspector #5247015-R5 (Electrical, Mechanical, Plumbing and Building)
Certified Infrared Thermographer (ASNT-TC1A Standards)
Texas Residential Construction Commission, Third Party Warranty Inspector #1593
Texas Residential Construction Commission, Inspector, County Inspection Program
Texas Department Of Insurance, VIP Inspector # 08507061016
Hayman Residential Engineering Services, Field Technician
CMC Energy - Certified Energy Auditor

Knowledge is power, but sharing knowledge brings peace!!
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