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95823 : Real Estate Advice

  • All30
  • Local Info3
  • Home Buying12
  • Home Selling2
  • Market Conditions0

Activity 25
Tue Jul 5, 2016
Angelica P answered:
Hi,

We didn't get enough information about your problem to resolve the issue. Please provide us with your email address and we will be happy to assist you.

Thank you for using Trulia!

Angelica
Consumer Care Advocate
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0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Thu Apr 14, 2016
Richard Littlefield answered:
Well it does not sound like a legal eviction. They must give you 30 notice if you have been paying the rent on time.

You need an attorney. You may need to file chapter 13.
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Sat Nov 21, 2015
Jim Walker answered:
Tue Sep 22, 2015
89jackmoore answered:
I am not completely sure about whether or not the insurance will cover this. I'm going to say that's probably a question for your insurance agent/provider. As for the police statement, of course! Definitely file a report whenever anything, especially something of such value, is stolen. You never know, maybe someone saw something suspicious and didn't think much of it. Always file when you're burglarized. http://www.tropicairfl.com ... more
0 votes 13 answers Share Flag
Mon Jul 6, 2015
Fanon Hutchins answered:
Hi Parris,

Are you still in search of a property to rent for you and your family? I can refer a few property management companies, that will be able to assist you in your search. Contact me if you are still in need of assistance.

Thank you,

Fanon L. Hutchins
CalBRE # 01862850
916-905-3513
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0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Fri May 15, 2015
Soniajanki answered:
The VA guidelines state 2 years, but don’t assume that means all will be well in two years. The VA guidelines stat that this is the MINIMUM time period, so late important to have the rest of the application file look as impressive as possible.

i would also highly recommend using a local lender. In this market the issue is finding a home, and the timeframes are tight to complete your transaction. Using a local lender is my preference to have your team (realtor, lender, etc.) synchronized to close on time without issue.

I'm not sure when your foreclosure was, but time has a way of going by pretty quickly. Before long, you'll be back searching for a home. Good luck!

One of the most consistently confusing situations for prospective homebuyers and lenders alike involves the thorny issues surrounding bankruptcy, foreclosure and the status of your mortgage.

Distressed homeowners may file for bankruptcy protection. Some want to keep their houses, others seek to have their mortgage debt discharged in the bankruptcy. Sometimes months or even years later the house is foreclosed upon. That’s a lot of serious financial consideration swirling around, and each puzzle piece can have a significant impact on your ability to secure a VA home loan.

Let’s take a closer look at having a mortgage discharged in a bankruptcy and what that can mean for VA loan prequalification.
> http://valoanguidelines.org/
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1 vote 10 answers Share Flag
Mon Jun 2, 2014
Cameron Novak answered:
This is probably not the best way to select a professional to help you sell your home (you probably already knew that I'd guess).

Good luck.
0 votes 22 answers Share Flag
Mon Sep 23, 2013
Jaime Becker answered:
Hi Melissa

It looks like you are talking about a rental, correct? If you are looking for a rental, it usually isn't that hard to find one. I would start around Jan beginning of Feb. Some rentals will even say available by a certain date.
Good luck.
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0 votes 9 answers Share Flag
Sat Sep 21, 2013
Nicole Fedorchek answered:
Most leases have a "no sub-lease" clause that these prospective tenants would be violating. In addition, your lease should have language regarding extended-stay overnight guests.

The fact that she wants to pay upfront should also be a RED FLAG! She is trying to bait you with cash into a situation that you are not comfortable with!

Insist of a rental application from ALL prospective occupants, and trust your gut! As a landlord, as much as you want to get the place rented, its a bigger headache and more costly to rent to bad tenants!
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0 votes 10 answers Share Flag
Sat Sep 21, 2013
Lee answered:
this is a personal family and legal matter- talk to your renters- Is it a minor or young adult- With the winter coming is patio enclosed- what was negotiated in rental agreement
0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Sun Apr 21, 2013
Terri Club answered:
I had a client who wanted to buy a home in Arizona, but he had a foreclosure. After researching the web I found a loan program at www.cfsflex.com, they allow a mortgage after a foreclosure. There is no waiting period. Good to see lending options coming back. ... more
0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Fri Nov 30, 2012
Tony Singh answered:
I'd recommend meeting with me to discuss you're options I'd love to help you out. (916) 236-5686 or email me at tsingh@aresrealty.com
0 votes 9 answers Share Flag
Sun Oct 28, 2012
Keisha Mathews answered:
Hello, no one on this thread would have that information. Only the homeowener/borrower on the loan.

You can ask your landlord, the homeowner/borrower to allow you to see the documentation that proves it has been modified. There's really not much else you can do.

Hope that helps.

Keisha Mathews
CDPE, HAFA, HRC Certified
Century 21 Landmark Network
Lic# 01439130
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0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Sun Oct 28, 2012
Bruce Slaton answered:
Loan modifications are not public record and a lender releasing that info to someone not authorized to get it could be a legal issue. You could make a request to your landlord but it's up to them to agree to provide it. A rental agreement is money paid for the right to live there, not really a requirement the landlord pay their mortgage.

New requirements in January require owners to disclose the filing of a Notice of Default to prospective tenants but that's about as far as it goes.

Best of luck in your situation

Bruce Slaton
Realty World eCurb REALTORS
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0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Fri Jul 20, 2012
Teri Andrews-Murch answered:
Mon Feb 6, 2012
Shelly Long answered:
Hi Jerry~

You are definitely receiving sound advice here on Trulia! Matter of fact, I'm not sure why ANYONE would hold an Open House for a rental. Furthermore, when I have investors, relocation clients or anybody wanting advice on rentals I ALWAYS tell them to start with Craigslist. In the years before Craigslist it was always the Sacramento Bee, but that is simply not a reliable source, nor do they have the comprehensive info such as Craigslist.

As for your neighbor, that could potentially invite risk where you don't want it. It's a double edged sword too....will the neighbor screen out everybody because they prefer no one in the property or do they simply not care who rents and subsequently push the first live body through the door. So, in my humble opinion, I'd be pushing your Property Manager to get the house on Craigslist ASAP and then get over there ASAP.

Good luck Jerry~!

Shelly Long
www.shellylongteam.com
916-806-4663
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0 votes 8 answers Share Flag
Wed Nov 2, 2011
Pat & Steve Pribisko answered:
From what you discribe, it appears that you entered into some type of non-traditional home purchase, such as a rent to own, & you have not received what you expected to receive. I suggest that you contact an Attorney who handles residential real estate matters ASAP. ... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Wed Jun 1, 2011
Harold Sharpe answered:
You will need to call two people.
1 a chiropractor for looking over your shoulder.
2 a real estate attorney.
The attorney should be able to make you feel better than the chiropractor.

Harold Sharpe - Broker
So Cal Homes Realty
(951) 821-8211
harold@socalhomesrealestate.com
http://www.socalhomesrealestate.com
California Department of Real Estate Broker License # 01312992
... more
1 vote 5 answers Share Flag
Tue Jun 22, 2010
Pooky answered:
Let me educate everyone interested in a Cal-Vet loan.

1) A Cal Vet loan is a land installment contract, which means that the California Department of Veteran's Affairs buys the home free and clear and holds title with the veteran holding the right to specific performance when the loan is paid off.

2)So if you fail to make your payment there is no foreclosure. Your past payments convert to rent and Cal Vet's remedy is to reclaim the property and keep the equity within it.

3)If there is a second mortgage on the property it has to first force judicial foreclosure on the property to come after the borrower (in this case both the veteran and Cal-Vet who agreed to the encumbrance).

4)Because Cal-Vet holds title free and clear (it is not legally a lien holder) the second has priority and Cal-Vet will pay off the encumbrance or the sale will pay off the "junior" lienholders first.

This program benefited Cal Vet when home prices were increasing and upon default they could sell the property for a profit and keep it. However, now their reluctance to work with veterans makes no sense as they bear all the risk.
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0 votes 30 answers Share Flag
Wed May 5, 2010
Stacey Wilson answered:
Hi Milan,

You can always question the comps that the appraiser used - especially if they are an out of town appraiser. Generally, bank are very careful about the list price. They have an appraisal and sometimes 2-3 broker price opinions to support the price. They won't list for more than it's worth because many people have to obtain financing and they know they will run into appraisal issues.

With many of the banks that I have worked for, they started rejecting offers that were way over asking price for this very reason. They know it won't appraise and many agents started using this strategy to snag the property in a multiple offer situation and then ask for a price reduction later. Accordingly, if the bank *did* accept a well above asking offer, they included an addendum to the sale that if it did not appraise the buyer was responsible for the difference.

A house is worth what someone will pay for it. Many people may chime in and ask why you would "over pay," but it may the perfect home for you and your family - a long term investment. If you were going to stay a short while or flip the property, I would advice against it as values may be down for some time. If it is your home, however, and it fits everything you are looking for in a home, it may be worth it to *you* to come up with the difference.

Bottom line is it is not illegal for the seller to cancel the contract if you cannot purchase the property at the price you agreed to -$190k. They don't care where the money comes from - your bank account or via your loan. If you didn't sign an addendum stating responsibility for the difference in appraisal price, try to renegotiate. I would also find out about the appraisers territory, comps used, etc. Your agent can also review comps to make sure your offer price is in line for financing.
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0 votes 11 answers Share Flag
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