Trulia Community - Advice from neighbors and local experts

Find Your Community
We couldn't find that location. Please try again.
Get Expert Advice

Foreclosure in 92024 : Real Estate Advice

  • All29
  • Local Info2
  • Home Buying9
  • Home Selling1
  • Market Conditions0

Activity 3
Wed Sep 18, 2013
Mike Stone answered:
There are many risks involved in purchasing at the court steps. You can hire anyone to make the purchase for you. You simply have to send someone you trust, to the court steps, with cashiers checks, in an envelope. You can communicate with them on the phone, while the bidding is taking place. Once you've made the purchase, the property is yours. Sometimes you will come out ahead, and at other times, it may cost you more than a non-foreclosure property, by the time you fix it up. What if the owner of the property, that is being foreclosed on, comes over and turns on a faucet or two, in the house, the night before the auction? I've personally seen some homes that have been trashed inside. As a Realtor with a builder back ground, I considered helping an investor acquire homes this way. I did a few dry runs. I would drive all over San Diego, to see the properties, estimate repairs, and stand on the court steps to learn, and observe. More often than not, the property of interest didn't come up for sale the day they said it would. The sale date is often postponed. I also found that properties under $500,000 were of interest to too many bidders. The price would be driven up to near retail. There are deals to be had, but not without risk. ... more
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Wed Sep 18, 2013
Mike Stone answered:
Generally agents don't want to take on the liability. There are many risks involved in purchasing at the court steps. You can hire anyone to make the purchase for you. You simply have to send someone you trust, to the court steps, with cashiers checks, in an envelope. You can communicate with them on the phone, while the bidding is taking place. Once you've made the purchase, the property is yours. Sometimes you will come out ahead, and at other times, it may cost you more than a non-foreclosure property, by the time you fix it up. What if the owner of the property, that is being foreclosed on, comes over and turns on a faucet or two, in the house, the night before the auction? I've personally seen some homes that have been torn apart inside. As a Realtor with a builder back ground, I considered helping an investor acquire homes this way. I did a few dry runs. I would drive all over San Diego, to see the properties, estimate repairs, and stand on the court steps to learn, and observe. More often than not, the property of interest didn't come up for sale, the day they said it would. The sale date is often postponed. I also found that properties under $500,000 were of interest to too many bidders. The price would be driven up to near retail. There are deals to be had, but not without risk. ... more
0 votes 7 answers Share Flag
Sat Jan 12, 2008
Roberta Murphy answered:
Though the overall number of qualified buyers has declined since 2006, Encinitas still has strong buyer appeal. We recommend to our clients that in times of market turmoil, it is best to put money into blue chip investments.

Is Encinitas in blue chip territory?

Absolutely!

The schools are excellent, the beaches are nearby and there is a wide choice in neighborhoods.

For additional information about Encinitas, visit http://www.SanDiegoPreviews.com/encinitas and for real time market reports about Encinitas, click the link below:
... more
0 votes 7 answers Share Flag
Search Advice
Search

Followers

419