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91784 : Real Estate Advice

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  • Local Info1
  • Home Buying9
  • Home Selling1
  • Market Conditions0

Activity 11
Wed Sep 14, 2016
answered:
It is the buyer's house, the buyer gets a set of the keys on closing. Just my opinion. The buyer really can't enter the house anyway so it should not be a be matter of contention.
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
Thu Mar 12, 2015
Alex Montelongo Real Estate Group answered:
Contact a contractor or builder. The question is so vague. There are so many variables that need to be considered.
Best of luck,

Alex Montelongo/Broker
Coldwell Banker Star Realty
562-810-7387 Cell
BRE Lic #01456982
... more
0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
Wed Apr 9, 2014
John Santana answered:
Hello Elaine
You should have it in 1-2 weeks on average in most counties in California.
If you don't see it then contact your escrow officer on the transaction or your realtor.
Let me know if I can be of further assistance.

John Santana
Johnsantana4homes@yahoo.com
(909) 230-8300
01463515
BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY
... more
0 votes 5 answers Share Flag
Fri Nov 1, 2013
Lance King answered:
As noted below, your contract should have specified when you should get keys. And I also agree that you should have the locks changed anyway - it's stupid and inconsiderate, but changing the locks is a lot easier and cheaper than arguing about it.

If you want to do something you can complain to the listing agent's broker and/or file a complaint with the local MLS or BRE.
... more
0 votes 11 answers Share Flag
Fri Dec 14, 2012
Al Jasemian answered:
This is an old question, but whoever responded to the question did not read his own response before submitting. Multiple spelling and grammar.
As a general rule, a buyer agent must be as specific as he/she can be when a personal property in included in purchase offer, that also goes for the listing agent. ... more
0 votes 11 answers Share Flag
Wed Nov 3, 2010
Gina Roquet answered:
First of all the buyers agent should check with the listing agent to see the current status of the listing, and whether there are offers in. Secondly, the agent needs to be very frank and realistic with their buyers about their offers. Low ball offers are not likely to be accepted and its important also to see how long the listing has been on the market. The last facor is the type of sale it is: standard, REO, or short sale. Acceptances on each of these sales type can have very different standards. For example buyers cannot expect to get closing costs covered on a short sale or REO. Home warranties and termite work are often not given either. So writing a smart offer and knowing who your "seller" is, is key. ... more
0 votes 6 answers Share Flag
Tue Nov 2, 2010
Victor Quiroz answered:
I think the true test of the market will be during the winter months when sales volume is traditionally down. If the market can hold or even gain some ground we might be looking up next Summer. If we lose ground in the Winter months it may be a problem for prices in the Summer ... more
0 votes 10 answers Share Flag
Tue Jun 22, 2010
Roland Corral answered:
Hi,
That depends on what you consider "desired" and by whom. Do you mean expensive, quiet, not on a busy street, keeps its value...? I can tell you that I am a licensed and certified Real Estate Appraiser as well as a Licensed Realtor. If banks won't buy or sell investing their hundreds of thousands of dollars without the professional advice of an appraiser and if the Federal Housing Administration will only accept a "Certified" appraisers stamp of approval on a property. Why would you do any less? Please feel free to call me at my cell: 909-917-6176. My clients receive the benefit of my expertise as a Realtor as well as a "Certified" Real Estate Appraiser.
I also have access to much more data than most real estate professionals do because I must pay for it and use it for appraising. This allows my buyers to find properties many don't even know are for sale. My sellers also know they will get top dollar for their properties because I can see the value as an appraiser and what improvements will benefit them most.
In the end however, Your transaction will be about you and what's best for you. I've actually advised people against buying or selling regardless of my loss of commission because of my knowledge of the market. I figure what goes around comes around. I help people that haven't owned a home in the last 3 years get first time home buyer down payment assistance even though the commission is less and there is more work to do. I know that if I do a good job for my clients and can show them I care, they will always send the blessing back to me.
Feel free to call and pick my brain. :)
In the meantime, God Bless,
Roland Corral
... more
0 votes 4 answers Share Flag
Tue Jun 22, 2010
Roland Corral answered:
Please call me at 909-917-6176. I'm a licensed Realtor but also a licensed and "Certified" California Real Estate Appraiser. A bank won't invest it's hundreds of thousands of dollars without the advice of an appraiser, why would you do anything less? Asking the value of a property is a very complicated question to be answered. That is why appraisers must be licensed and cannot give a value unless there has been due diligence on the appraisers behalf. My clients receive the benefit of my knowledge as an appraiser and they can be comfortable with what they buy or sell homes for. ... more
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