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All Locations : Nationwide Real Estate Advice

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A moment ago
Les asked:
Hi, we live in New castle IN have rented the house we are in for 15 years. @ of our son's moved to Muncie. We are looking for at least 3-bed rm 2 bath A family residence, not college…
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A few minutes ago
Jim Faller asked:
A few minutes ago
Waresandra9 answered:
Hello do yall have any properties available that yall take the section 8 voucher for
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A few minutes ago
Kathy Burgreen answered:
You will run into serious consequences using multiple real estate agents in PA. I know it's common in New York City and yes, buyers can easily get away with it BUT anywhere outside of NYC, forget it. It won't work and will hurt you.

The issue is realtors spend time and money assisting buyers and they want to get paid for their time working with you. Therefore, anytime you sign a Buyer's Agreement means that realtor will check the MLS system if you happen to buy a home with a different agent while you were under the terms of the Buyer Agreement you signed with that first agent. If your realtor is not working 100% in your best interest, you need to speak with the Office Manager or Broker in Charge and voice your complaint. The Office Manager or Broker can assign you to a different agent but it is their decision.

If you keep your mouth shut and these agents find out thru the MLS that you bought a home with a different agent, you will owe a commission to the first agent.

As for NYC, the reason buyers get away with it is because of the huge population and the number of sales. There are so many building sales that realtors don't have time to spend verifying names of buyers, so it's easy to get away with it. However, outside of NYC, there are very few buildings and a much lower population, so real estate agents have the time to check the system every day.
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A few minutes ago
E Hilliard asked:
I listed my house FSBO on Zillow, and they said it would show on Trulia as well. But it doesn't come up on a search unless I put in the exact address. How can I fix that?
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A few minutes ago
Carojl0424 answered:
I file for homestead 2013 do I need to file again. Could you give me information on how often I should file. What is the requirement.
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A few minutes ago
Kathy Burgreen answered:
Real estate websites like Trulia, Zillow and others pay 3ard party vendors to copy property information from counties across the U.S. This includes property taxes. However, in a few states, property information is not public so it cannot be shown on websites. Not sure if your state is one of those non public states or counties.

As for realtors adding tax information to their listings, realtors do not want to take on the legal liability if the tax information is not correct. Therefore, as a buyer, your best method is to have a realtor email you listings directly from the MLS. All MLS systems in the U.S. provide the latest tax information for all homes for sale. In your situation, you will be better served getting listings directly from the MLS.
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A few minutes ago
james turano asked:
With a great shortage of apartments, when we list a modern apartment, and it may be lower than the norm, we ask tenants to call the agent in the ad directly, but they do not. Once advertised…
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A few hours ago
Kathy Burgreen answered:
Unfortunately, real estate websites like Trulia, Zillow and others do NOT have a separate search filter to separate condos from coops. Brokerage websites in New York City do have separate search filters to separate condos and coops. You need to use a brokerage website. Examples: Sotheby's, Coldwell Banker, Douglas Elliman, Corcoran, Exit Realty, etc. ... more
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A few hours ago
Tburke answered:
Did you ever get this question resolved, there ARE certain ways in which this could be dealt with
Tom Burke
Mortgage network
570-313-736 nmls #460277
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A few hours ago
Jimmolchan asked:
Purchased a home with an abandoned underground Propane tank. Didn't even know it was there at the time of the sale, not in disclosure. Now a few months later the propane company wants it…
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A few hours ago
thinkmac answered:
I got in touch with HCAD, and they mentioned that I would need to file the form 25.25RP with as much evidence that can support the claim to update the legal description
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A few hours ago
Kathy Burgreen answered:
There are no barriers and New York City has plenty of foreign buyers or investors. Being a life long New York City area resident and former realtor, you need to know the following:

Real estate is VERY expensive in New York City and as a foreigner, you will need to buy a condo or a town house. You can also buy a single or multi family house outside of Manhattan. The only restriction is foreigners cannot buy a coop unit. Coop units are for U.S. legal residents only.

As a foreigner, you will be required to have a large down payment - at least 30%. Also if you ever sell, you will be subject to the FIRPTA tax which is a tax on foreigners who sell real estate in the U.S.

Hope this helps.
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A few hours ago
Jessica Brantner answered:
I was told once upon a time that the closing costs could not exceed a certain percentage of the loan amount, And closing costs are a fairly set amount. Not sure what those numbers were, but for example, $2,000 in closing costs can't be more than 5% of total loan amount, means loan can't exceed a total of 43000 or so. Is there any accuracy to that and is that part of where the "limits" are established from? ... more
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A few hours ago
Kathy Burgreen answered:
Why should any landlord give you a second chance? The eviction is because you refused to pay your rent. Landlords need their rental income. If you can prove you will pay your rent on time every month no matter what, then landlords will give you a chance. Right now all they see is a tenant who will skip paying rent and they don't care. Remember the old saying - fool me once, it's on me. Fool me twice, it's on you. You're on the fool me twice right now. ... more
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