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All Locations : Nationwide Real Estate Advice

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A few minutes ago
connoranne answered:
my personal experience i had to get some of my collections removed before buying a home, my mortgage rep had told me it would be better to get them removed. WHICH I HAD NO CLUE WHAT TO DO..... we got recommended to a company called select us which was great, they had all four collections removed my score jumped up higher and it also all happen in less then 6 months i was so so happy ... more
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A few minutes ago
connoranne answered:
My husband and i where all set to go we went to close on our house and a collection had came up from years ago. it was a scramble to figure out how we where going to get it removed, our mortgage rep had told us about a company called select us that he has had progress with. we called them and in 30 days they had the collection removed and we where in out house. ... more
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A few minutes ago
Ariana Strozzi Mazzucchi asked:
A few minutes ago
Kira Dawn Compton asked:
We have a verbal agreement and currently dont have receipts. We do receive mail there. Can they tell us to leave and make us? What rights do we have. I am going to start documenting our…
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A few minutes ago
Pamdrew1 answered:
I would say NACA is a good program overall and when it comes to the percentage rate. BUT!! NACA is not for everyone, it's just not. I went through this program 3 times!!! I wouldn't say it was a total waste if nothing else it did prepare me for purchasing a home a far as getting my credit in line, which is not required by NACA. But if you have judgements, collections, and late pays that is a NO NO no matter what lender you go with. I have student loans which did keep me from purchasing the home I hoped to get. However, in end I did not get a loan through NACA, I got it through Navy Federal Credit Union. They also had a program with no closing cost and No Money down., I got a decent percentage rate. I would suggest to anyone with student loans, make sure the loans is current and the best situation is to have a payment in place, I didn't my loans were deferred. I am now in 1 month of being a happy homeowner. I love my home and yes I could have gotten something a little bigger, if I had a payment in place for my student loans, and just 1 or 2 more things off my credit. It was all worth it! My home is the perfect size it was all newly remodeled. Good Luck to you! ... more
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A few minutes ago
dhamra asked:
A few minutes ago
Jay Calhoun asked:
I was interested in the 60,000 to 80,000 dollar houses
0 votes 0 Answers Share Flag
A few minutes ago
Kristinamendes258 answered:
Thank you cyberguru. I am a proud owner of a new home. After bankruptcy and an ugly divorce, I was able to fix both my boyfriends credit and my credit within 2 months with your DIY credit repair kit. contact him on cyberguru@inbox.ru.. hes the best in town. ... more
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A few hours ago
Floridian asked:
I am looking for an agent/broker/realtor to help me to buy an auction home in Jupiter/Palm Beach Gardens/West Palm Beach. I am thinking of financing an action home if they can help me with…
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A few hours ago
Kathy Burgreen answered:
Forget investors - they cannot help you. You and your sibling who want out need to contact a real estate attorney and explain your situation. Briefly, your sibling who is currently living in this home needs to find out if he/she can refinance or take out a loan with the cash out paid to you and your sibling who both want out. A real estate attorney can sort out the legal issues.

Nobody online can advise you because we don't know what the terms of the will stated and there could be issues we are not aware of. As for investors, Susie's answer is correct. Investors don't want to get involved with family disputes and since your sibling lives there rent free, there is no income for the investor. So why would an investor pay money for 2/3 of a house and not receive a monthly income from the purchase? Investors are only interested in 1 thing - making money from their purchase. They don't buy 2/3 of a house and not make a penny from it.
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A few hours ago
Kathy Burgreen answered:
It may be legal to post the rental online and show it to prospective tenants before your current tenant leaves BUT you have bigger issues to deal with first. You need to start eviction proceedings and verify that your tenant physically left including all of their stuff. The issue is if you sign a lease with a new tenant, suppose your current tenant damages the rental, refuses to leave, etc. Then what was the point of having a new tenant sign a lease?

I know you don't want to lose a month's rent, but your first priority is to make sure your current tenant has left. You may be facing damages to the rental and end up having to fix any repairs which takes time. Finally - did you thoroughly vet your current tenant? Did you do a credit check, background check, etc. or did you just have your current tenant fill out the application and sign a lease? The fact that your current tenant failed to pay the rent on time should have been noticed during a credit and background check - employment, income, credit, criminal, etc.
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A few hours ago
Kathy Burgreen answered:
To post your home for sale - and it's FREE - you need to start on Zillow.com. Zillow and Trulia are the same company, so once it's posted on Zillow, it will sync to Trulia within 1 - 2 days. Owners need to type in their address, claim their home and then post it for sale.

BEWARE: Realtors pay monthly advertising fees to Zillow and Trulia in order to get leads from buyers and sellers. Because realtors pay monthly fees, they do appear on For Sale By Owner listings. Buyers who submit the Contact Form on your listing will be directed to the realtor on your listing - even though you have no contract with that realtor. Realtors can tell buyers that your home is NOT for sale because most realtors just check the MLS system and if your home is not in the MLS system - to a realtor it's not for sale.

To get around this, there are Flat Fee brokerages, Redfin, etc. You need to Google "flat fee brokers". Briefly, it means you can have your home listed in the MLS system for a small flat fee but you are 100% in charge of everything else. You will be required to pay a buyers broker a commission (about 3%) but you do save the other 3% by not listing with a full service broker. In a sense, once your home is listed in your local MLS system, realtors will be happy to show buyers your house.
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A few hours ago
Kathy Burgreen answered:
I passed the NY State exam the 1st time with a 96. If it helps, what I did was read the book several times, downloaded 2 study prep apps and reviewed all my notes. I know the exam has some math questions, so just wondering if you failed the math portion. If this is the case, you will need to learn some math. Another issue is a number of questions are "trick" questions. You need to read the questions very carefully and interpret the meaning of the question before answering. My advice - don't rush yourself while taking this exam. You're given plenty of time so pace yourself and don't be among the first people out the door. Nobody cares if you're the last person to finish the test.

So learn some math and learn some techniques on how to answer "trick" questions and how to interpret the meaning of them. I know some questions sound like a double negative and this is what you need to know.

Finally - I don't know if it was explained thoroughly in your class but when taking the test, you need to realize that you need to have knowledge of single family houses as well as coops, condos, etc. The test covers both.
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0 votes 2 answers Share Flag
A few hours ago
Andreafsouthern asked:
A few hours ago
Kathy Burgreen answered:
What contingencies do you have in your contract? Do you have one that states "HOA documents / bylaws must be delivered by ______". If your contract doesn't have this contingency, you will have to use one of your other contingencies to terminate your contract and lie about it in order to get the deposit returned. If you are getting a loan from your lender, you can use that contingency and explain to your lender that you need a foolproof excuse to terminate your contract.

Before doing the above, a very simple solution is WHY hasn't anybody contacted the HOA to get the bylaws in the first place? The seller can get it, the seller's realtor can get it, your lender can get it, so again WHY hasn't any of the above people contacted the HOA to get the bylaws??? Sounds like everybody is sleeping on the job or nobody gives a crap.

One final thought - Realtors and your lender want to close this deal quickly. FIRMLY remind them that if you back out because you haven't received the bylaws means they are NOT getting paid and their paychecks will be delayed because they will need to start from scratch and look for a new buyer. NOBODY works for free.
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A few hours ago
Kathy Burgreen answered:
As a retired / former realtor, unfortunately nobody explained to you the negatives of buying new construction / new built homes. So I will have to give you the bad news.

When it comes to new built / new construction homes, the purchase contracts that builders use are written by lawyers to benefit the builders - not you. Builders don't use the standard state contracts that realtors use. Therefore, the terms, etc. are never in your favor. When it comes to pricing the individual homes (especially those in developments), builders know that buyers like you LOVE new construction homes. Therefore, builders can easily price these homes at premium prices (meaning overcharge the homes) because there are plenty of buyers interested in new homes. If you (the buyer) thought your home was priced too high, your builder couldn't care less. He / she knew it takes about 5 min. - 1 day for a different buyer to walk in and submit an offer on YOUR house. So why should your builder care 1 bit about lowering the price for your house?

Sorry but you got suckered into being overcharged for your new house. Builders know as soon as you move in (yes the same day you close), the value of YOUR house declines. This means since you already live there, your "new" home is NOT considered new anymore. It is now being compared to older homes in your neighborhood. On average it takes about 5 YEARS for a homeowner to LIVE in their "new" home in order to gain any equity. In some markets it can be as little as 3 years, so 5 years is the average for the U.S.

Sorry to give you the bad news but unfortunately it's considered the "hidden truth" in real estate. Builders, realtors and even lenders are all aware of this but unfortunately everybody keeps their mouth shut about it and if you ask them directly, they will tell you the truth - quietly. Don't expect any professional to broadcast it. The reason? It will hurt future sales and since these are all salespeople - they need buyers to purchase new built homes.

Bottom line - your appraiser is correct. You overpaid for your house. The only compensation you have is to own it for 4 more years.
... more
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A few hours ago
Randi Hill asked:
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