Trulia Community - Advice from neighbors and local experts

Find Your Community
We couldn't find that location. Please try again.
Get Expert Advice

All Locations : Nationwide Real Estate Advice

  • All727K
  • Local Info61K
  • Home Buying266K
  • Home Selling46K
  • Market Conditions26K

Activity 508,406
A few hours ago
Kimsome14u2love answered:
6months or 12 months if on 3 Acres or more
0 votes 3 answers Share Flag
A few hours ago
Othmankloko asked:
A few hours ago
Othmankloko asked:
A few hours ago
Othmankloko asked:
0 votes 0 Answers Share Flag
A few hours ago
Kathy Disque asked:
A few hours ago
Keisha Clegg answered:
Back in 2016 we had one major drawback. Hubby lost his job, I had an accident that made me quit my job as well. We collected thousands of money from our Home Equity line of credit (HELOC) account which works sort of like a credit card to raise our son through college. This caused our credit scores to drop drastically, the bank almost terminated our line of credit and at that point I almost regretted my existence in life. I am using this opportunity to say a BIG THANK YOU to my sister and her BFF she introduced to us as a credit score hacker and counselor. He cleared our HELOC debt of $142,000 and raised our scores to 765 and 758. My special thanks goes to this genius hacker, we purchased our second home last week for our son. As we have promised to give him more clients if he should successfully fix our problems. We are living testimonies and confident of this miracle worker to handle all jobs, I will implore everyone facing challenges with credit scores, credit report,bankruptcy,mortgage issues to reach him on:

pyramideye(.)hack (AT) outlook(.)com
... more
0 votes 83 answers Share Flag
Yesterday at 7:59pm
Kathylakritz answered:
All of the major insurance companies offer rent insurance - GEICO, Progressive, AllState, Liberty Mutual, etc.
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Yesterday at 7:57pm
Charjim Goodrow asked:
Yesterday at 7:56pm
Charjim Goodrow asked:
Yesterday at 7:50pm
Keisha Clegg answered:
In 2016 we had one major drawback. Hubby lost his job, I had an accident that made me quit my job as well. We collected thousands of money from our Home Equity line of credit (HELOC) account which works sort of like a credit card to raise our son through college. This caused our credit scores to drop drastically, the bank almost terminated our line of credit and at that point I almost regretted my existence in life. I am using this opportunity to say a BIG THANK YOU to my sister and her BFF she introduced to us as a credit score hacker and counselor. He cleared our Heloc debt of $142,000 and raised our scores to 765 and 758. My special thanks goes to this genius hacker, we purchased our second home last week for our son. As we have promised to give him more clients if he should successfully fix our problems. We are living testimonies and confident of this miracle worker to handle all jobs, I will implore everyone facing challenges with credit scores, credit report,bankruptcy,mortgage issues to reach him on...

pyramideye(.)hack@outlook(.)com
... more
0 votes 74 answers Share Flag
Yesterday at 7:49pm
Kathylakritz answered:
I'm a retired realtor and still in touch with lenders. Yes lenders will accept a letter from your employer as proof of income, It must have a start date. If you will be working in NYC, you should also search in the nearby suburbs as housing is cheaper. Example - for Brooklyn College, St. Johns Univ., Queens College - look for housing in Nassau County

For Columbia Univ., look for housing in Westchester County. For NYU - you may be stuck with Brooklyn or Manhattan. New Jersey is probably not ideal because you will be stuck paying income taxes to both states and that is expensive.
... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Yesterday at 7:38pm
Kathylakritz answered:
As a former realtor, you will have difficulty. Very few realtors work with foreclosed / REO listings because it requires additional time and paperwork and the commission fee earned is less than what realtors earn on a regular home sale. Realtors are independent contractors and need to organize their time efficiently so they can make as much income as possible. So the question becomes, why would a realtor want to spend an extra 3 months on a foreclosed listing with no paycheck when that realtor can easily sell 2 regular listings in that time and make 2 commissions.

Bottom line - every realtor will choose a regular sale over a foreclosure any day of the week. To a realtor - a foreclosure is not worth their time unless the value of the home is about $1 million. Then that realtor will do a foreclosure.
... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
Yesterday at 7:23pm
Kathylakritz answered:
I know this is a 10 yr. old question but needs to be updated because previous replies give the wrong facts about coops and misinformation. So to straighten things out -

Buying a coop in the New York City area is a very smart investment whether it was during the past recession or today. Owners do gain equity and if you itemize on your tax returns, you are allowed to deduct mortgage interest and property taxes. However, with the new tax law that was passed last month, coop owners in the NYC suburbs will have an advantage over single family houses because property taxes are much less for coops than houses and will be under the $10,000. cap, so there will be enough to combine the property tax with state and local income taxes. Owners of houses may not be able to do both.

Owning a coop is typically considered a starter home where most coop owners live there for 5 years or so until they're ready to move up to a house. On the other end, there are buyers who are downsizing from houses to coops because they need to give up maintenance, high property taxes and space. Also many buyers raise families in coop buildings and live there for years. This is especially true in top rated school districts in the suburbs where buyers cannot afford to buy houses yet they want their children to attend top rated schools.

Buyers who purchase a coop are not as concerned with type of ownership because in many cases, their purchasing budget restricts them to coops which are priced much cheaper than condos and houses. Down payment requirements in the suburbs averages 10% with a few that go as high as 20%. Within NYC, the down payment requirements are higher with the average 20% and up.
... more
0 votes 13 answers Share Flag
Yesterday at 6:56pm
Luke Taylor answered:
It sounds like a good idea especially because of access to owner-occupant financing. However I'm wondering about privacy, being accessible by your renter for repairs, etc. This was posted in 2008. How did things turn out? ... more
0 votes 6 answers Share Flag
Yesterday at 6:50pm
Kathylakritz answered:
Restrictions with pets applies to rentals only, however, you did not state if you are inquiring about a rental. The issue has to do with liability. Landlords and property managers can rent to tenants who are willing to pay for pet insurance with liability and damage coverage, however, most tenants refuse or cannot afford to pay for pet insurance. Pet insurance is expensive. Landlords could add a fee to tenants with pets but that fee will also be very expensive and tenants will refuse or cannot afford an extra fee on top of their monthly rent.

When you live in a single family house, you can have as many pets as you want within your town's zoning laws because as the owner, you are responsible for any liability or damage issues. When living in a building or somebody else's house, you are a tenant and not responsible for liability or damage unless you buy pet insurance for that purpose.
... more
0 votes 1 answer Share Flag
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Search Advice
Search