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All Locations : Nationwide Real Estate Advice

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A few minutes ago
Trent Rhodes answered:
Good evening Jennifer,

It is the common practice for the spouse to sign at closing any time you are taking out a mortgage. It does not make him responsible for your mortgage and it doesn't affect his credit. The purpose of him signing is to acknowledge that you are taking out a mortgage; however, there are a couple exceptions to the rules.

First and foremost, you have to work with the right people that know these exceptions. The mortgage company will allow you to close without your spouse signing if the title insurance company will not omit any title insurance coverages due to his not signing. They will require a letter from the title company specifically saying that they will fully cover the property even without his signature. There is only one title company in the Oklahoma City area that I know of that will provide this type of letter.

Feel free to send a message to me privately if you would like more information regarding this or if you have any other questions. It just isn't common to do it this way.
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A few minutes ago
Dean-Ross Schessler answered:
Your wisdom and your wealth have to be in unison.
If you are rich then save the money on the inspections.
If you are not rich, hire an inspector with a certification and a license and if something happens you have someone to help you bear the costs.
This old phrase comes to mind: A dill and his dough are often soon parted.
Bottom line, its a gamble, just like the rest of life whatever you do will be a rolling of the dice.
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A few minutes ago
Robert Hayley answered:
Welcome to Texas, Sarah! Congrats on starting out your real estate career. There's a lot to consider when you're thinking about how you want to pursue it. I've been a managing broker, recruiter, Realtor and more. I would be happy to help you explore ideas that would work for you. ... more
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A few minutes ago
Diane Christner answered:
The condo community has to be on the approved list you can find at HUD.gov. Sorry but this site won't allow me to post the direct link for you.

HUD has guidelines that must be met by the condo community, things such as number of investor owners, number of units delinquent on fees, required reserve funds for major repairs and maintenance, adequate insurance coverage.

A lot of FL condos have too many rentals, too little in the reserve funds or insurance coverage is not sufficient to meet FHA guidelines. It also requires the condo board and management complete documents for HUD, which not all are willing to do. Some were previously approved but let the certification lapse. It makes it difficult for FHA buyers to purchase condos, but it's not impossible. As I mentioned at the top of my post, all approved condo communities must be on the HUD approved list, so that is where I would start my condo search.... by seeing what options are open to you in your area.

Good luck with your search.
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A few minutes ago
Mjdeeringer7 answered:
If the seller is doing their due diligence then why back out. If theres issues with the home request repairs. If its still not the right home and you haven't signed off on all your contingencies, then yes you can back out and request a return of deposit in Calif. ... more
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A few hours ago
Reereeloc asked:
Can you please help found ahouse ranging from. 700 - 800 monthly and move in tomorrow because lam homelessl live inphiladelpha pa19151 contact me2157155276 thersascott can you help
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A few hours ago
Lulalott.1922.1 answered:
the property is deeded to me and my husband.But the loan is defaulted in a nother name but i want to keep my property.it is also inherieted and have other heirs tired to the property.
0 votes 15 answers Share Flag
A few hours ago
Brian Ploszay answered:
A few hours ago
Brian Ploszay answered:
A few hours ago
Elisha59 answered:
A few hours ago
Alan May answered:
That's going to depend, entirely, on the language in the contract, they signed with their listing agent/agency.
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A few hours ago
Alan May answered:
If you default on a ratified contract (signed and agreed to by both parties), then, yes... you can be sued for breach of contract, and potentially for specific performance.

I'm not an attorney, so this should not be considered legal advice. You should consult with an attorney. ... more
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A few hours ago
Alan May answered:
nope. Your inspection is part of your due diligence.
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A few hours ago
Famham answered:
Queens NY is the most diverse city in the whole USA. Its a fact, I love NYC
0 votes 14 answers Share Flag
A few hours ago
Kennedybrister asked:
A few hours ago
Mikai asked:
I went to a party hosted by my co-worker and learned that his neigbhour was preparing their house for sale. They invited me in. I love the house and their honesty about all the problems.…
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A few hours ago
Robert Hayley answered:
In our area, some agents have hired "showing agents" and they pay them a nominal fee to show the house if they get a sign call and it's in another part of town, they're out-of-town, working with another client, etc. I don't know of a service, per se, that will do this. If your brokerage has offices in other areas, you can work referral agreements with other agents. ... more
0 votes 7 answers Share Flag
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