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Seller, Home Seller in Northshore, Houston,...

How can a new realtor gain experience? Everything I read tells me to go with an experienced realtor. I have

Asked by Seller, Northshore, Houston, TX Sun Nov 25, 2007

a relative who is a new realtor and not local - I'm getting family pressure to use them so that they get some experience.

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17
barF... baRF.... BARF..... This makes me sick!

Are you hiring a Realtor or a Relative?

Would you let your "uncle Joey" the new dentist, do his first root canal on you?

Tell your family to mind their own business. Tell them to go out and buy an investment property with the new Realtor.
That will shut them up.

Not even a local Realtor? What are you a guinea pig?

You`re lucky there is not a new surgeon in the family.

I hope this helps.
3 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
Mr.P, Other/Just Looking in Arizona
MVP'08
I have handled 8 transactions for family members. Several were in my first two years. All were very satisfied with the service and results.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
Jim Walker, Real Estate Pro in Carmichael, CA
MVP'08
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Pick the agent that you feel will give you the best results. Ignore the fact that they are related. If you feel comfortable with their skills, use them. Also remember that they will, or should be guided through the process by their managing Broker. On the other hand, if they are not up to your needs or have the skill sets you require, use a more experienced Realtor. Most Realtor's started from nothing and developed their Customer base. Any new Realtor joining the profession, should be given the same opportunity, and not simply ignored just because they are new. As previously posted, there are so called experienced agents that you wonder how they have stayed in the business so long; and there are new, less experienced, agents that can run rings around them that deserve a chance.
Good Luck!
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
Thank you all for your responses. This realtor already listed our house for 6 months and was unable to sell it. She worked very hard and it is unclear to me what the problem was (inexperience, not local, personality difference - I am VERY high maintenance, price, marketing, etc.). All that being said, I also don't want to be responsible for their financially having a bad year because we decide we need to try another realtor which at least eliminates the non-local and perhaps the inexperience from the equation).

What I'd like to get at is some practical suggestions to offer to help them really get their business rolling. I come from law firms where you "Eat what you kill" so I'm not sure if this is the sort of information you would share but I figured it never hurts to ask. I am a big believer that you need to provide solutions, not just identify problems.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
I think Patrick said it quite well. I would not want to be the first and be an experiment. Welcome back Patrick and Deborah
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
Pam Winterba…, Real Estate Pro in Danville, VA
MVP'08
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Patrick - If I weren't already married...

Thanks for the chuckle - I wish I had it in me.

Now I've been thinking about taking up knife-throwing for a hobby, any volunteers to be my assistant?
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
I am quite confident that most successful Realtors have read, The Millionaire Real Estate Agent by Gary Keller ( Ebay $3.00 )
I use it at least 3 times a week, and have read it 20 times.
It is a road map to success. It will make a great stocking stuffer.

I also spend a lot of time reading http://www.Bloodhoundblog.com
The relative can learn a lot there.

The bottom line is that this is a tough business. Relative needs to make something happen everyday.
There is a reason 95% of Realtors don`t make their third year anniversary.

Good luck with the shack.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
Mr.P, Other/Just Looking in Arizona
MVP'08
Question: Have you discussed this with the agent that your family wants you to use. They may not feel comfortable selling your home because it is out of their area. I have turned down business in areas that were outside of my comfort zone. What I have offered is to find an agent that is qualified in the area that the family member was looking in. This helps the buyer (you) because they are getting a qualified referral and it helps the agent (your relative) because they get a referral fee.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
Dear Seller
You have some wonderful advice from the previous posts. I would like to add just a few comments:
1. Time in the business does not necessarily result in knowledge
I know quite a few agents with many years in the business. However, if they never progress, never learn, then how valuable is "time in the saddle". OTOH, I some new Realtors that have been diligent in learning as much as they can about the business, and cal also APPLY what they learn

2. The number of transactions does not necessarily imply good work habits
In almost every market there are a few visible agents that, once you get to know them, you ask yourself the question, "How did they get this far?"

3. As suggested by a number of posters, the question should be: who is the best person to sell my property?
This is exactly the question I would pose to whomever you interview. And in fairness, I strongly suggest that you interview the family member, and two more Realtors. The process will be a very good one for all parties.

I recall when I first got my license, a good friend of ours said, "I going to use Joe because I promised him years ago if I ever moved, I would hire him". That is one way to look at it. I would, as a friend and as a new licensee, if he had said, "I know that you are new, however I like you and value our friiendship. What I will do is interview you just I would another agent. The sale of my home is very important to me and I want the best Realtor I can find. So I am going to give you an opportunity to earn my business. "

That would set better with me. Usually when I am on listing appointments, I am competing anyway. Might as well get the family friend accostomed to it. At least you will have given him a chance. You might be surprised!

I lost a listing once, and the sellers said, (I was competing with another Keller Williams agent, from the same office), "This is very hard for us. However we only have one house and had to pick one".

The last thing I would like to address is the distance issue. Speaking for myself, I have an issue with out of area agents. They don't know the market, they don't know our local rules and regs, and they are not "building their brand" in our market. Referring out of area listings to local agents seems to be in the client's best interest (IMHO).

The Calif. Association of Realtors 2007 Buyer survey shows that buyers are shown the home they purchase by a Realtor 90% of the time. So have positive relations with local brokers is key. As a potential listing agent, I would rather refer a listing a local Realtor that has good relationship with the other local Realtors.

I hope these perspective help. Best of luck to you.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
Keith Sorem, Real Estate Pro in Glendale, CA
MVP'08
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Patrick... Thanks for the entertainment tonight and the blunt answer. I am still smiling.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
You are in a pickle. If you do not use the family member you will be making your family mad and if you do use the family member and she does not do a good job then you will be mad. I understand that you this is a huge decision for you. Guess what? You could choose another agent and still not have a good experience. Your family member could do a great job for you. I actually feel more pressure for family members than I do with as unrelated client... I guess I feel I have more to prove.

With that being said I would not hire them just because they are family. Have them do a presentation to you just as they would with any seller. Ask them the questions you would ask any agent. If you are uncomfortable with their distance then tell them upfront and tell them that you would like them to co-list with a local agent so that both of them can present. If they does a good job then you hire them. If you still do not feel comfortable then do not hire them. You can explain to your family that is a big transaction for you and you need to be cautious. They are going to be a little nervous presenting to you so cut them a little slack.

Put the shoe on the other foot. If you were them and they were you, what would you expect? This is an opportunity to put a good reference under her belt. Perhaps you could give them 30 days to prove that they can service your home and your real estate needs?? If they drop the ball then you will have no guilt and you can say you tried. If they blow you away then you can send lots of referrals their way.

What distance are we talking anyway. I live in the Atlanta area which is large... I have listed and sold property 45 minutes from me. An agent that gives great service will give great service regardless of distance... I have seen agents who live in the same neighborhood have empty flyer boxes. Distance does not equate to good service.

Best of luck!
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
Hello Patrick - welcome back. You do know how to make your presence known, don't you? Good that I am used to your style :-))

Sorry, Deborah, forgot to welcome you back - but you did not make a wave anywhere close to Patrick's. So, here is a delayed welcome back.

Actually, Seller, I thought you were going to give Deborah a call and chat - It would have saved us lots of typing and Patrick's knife throwing.

Then you can come back with anything unanswered after that; which I hope will be minimum. . .

Sylvia
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
Sylvia Barry,…, Real Estate Pro in Marin, CA
MVP'08
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Welcome -Patrick.. We can always count on you to give it to us straight! LOL. You always make my day with your wit and candor.
Deborah
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Brick, NJ
MVP'08
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Oh, yes, family obligation, I have quite a few of those, so I understand. However, 'pressuring' you to use the family member, not only is the family member new; but also not local, I really worry about where the loyalty stands, but I guess that;s what you have to decide.

So, here is what I would do if I was you - I will make sure your relative is with a solid brokerage, have him/her co-list with a local agent (how far is far?), make sure they provide you with a ;'detailed' marketing plan for your area, and show that they understand your area; work out a communication plan with you so the distance is not a problem. Also, how much does your relative know about the local real estate law and customary practices? Your family member will need to learn and follow through with all these.

Also, make sure the listing agreement is cancellable - if it does not work out and the only reason you are listing with this family member is because you have to, then watch closely and make sure you are not tied to this if things don't work out.

One of my listings is exactly the same situation except for the person is local. His mentor did not help at all and the house had virtually no presence on the market. Luckily they were able to cancel the contract (actually the person ended up looking for a new job because real estate was too tough to break into).

I am not saying that your relative will not do an outstanding job for you, but It is your house that's at stake.
.
Sylvia
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
Sylvia Barry,…, Real Estate Pro in Marin, CA
MVP'08
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It can be a catch 22. If your relative has a background in sales or marketing from another industry they are bringing that experience with them to the real estate field. Are they working full-time as a realtor, or just trying to do it on a part-time basis? how far away are they from where you live? Are they working for a broker that has a mentoring or established training program, where they can have help whenever they need it? If all those considerations are in place, then I think they should be included in your interviewing process.
New agents can sometimes bring new perspectives, ideas, and lots of energy!
Web Reference: http://www.northropteam.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
Newbes can be just as good as an experienced realtor and not having a family member support you is incredibly disheartening.

If you feel uncomfortable with this realtive's lack of experience, ask him/her to co-list the property with an experienced agent - then u get two for the price of one!
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
Hi Seller,
Don't go w/ a family member simply out of obligation. If a newbie has a great support system that will be aiding them, do not rule them out. Put them in the matrix of those under consideration and evaluate all of your prospective listing agents. Newbies, when supported well by a mentor or broker/manger, can do a good job. Make the decision that is best for you as seller, not what the family member needs. Agents often get boot camp as buyers agents and work in to listings. You are not responsible for your family member's training. If the newbie is serious about being a Realtor, perhaps they could co-list w/ another more experienced agent. Only go this route if you are comfortable that your interests will be well taken care of.
Deborah
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 25, 2007
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Brick, NJ
MVP'08
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