Santa, Other/Just Looking in Saint Pete Beach, FL

What should I charge to clean foreclosed homes?

Asked by Santa, Saint Pete Beach, FL Fri Sep 26, 2008

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Answers

62
Santa,

Thank you Don & Greg!

Answers are right on + there's a few more facts:

Not only am I an agent, but my husband has been in the business of providing a "full" service Trash Out, Sales Clean, handyman, etc. company.

During the "mean & lean" times, there are several companies out there that just want to "underbid" companies that are "Licensed, Bonded, & Insured" business' & contractor's. We've been providing this service for over 2 years and have seen a dramatic change even in this type of industry.

The only image of this type of "service" is that it's an "easy" way to may "GOOD" money. Well, from experience, there are times when you receive payment and say "I actually made a profit on this one!!"

Many lender's require you provide "2" bids if the estimate is over $495. That does bring in the competitveness. On several jobs, our company has received the approval even though the estimate comes in higher?

Why? The experienced REO agents provide "due diligence" to their lender's by researching and making sure the companies they hire are "insured".

If you are allowed onto the property for a clean-out, repairs, or any type of maintenance and the contractor/sub-contractor, or employee is injured, it can become a complicated situation.

Good REO Trash-Out companies are covered by a minimum of a $1,000,000.00 insurance policy. Two lender's that I'm ($aware of actually insist on having proof by a "Certificate" from the insurance carrier or you don't get the job. Insurance premiums can be exceptionally expensive for these companies, ($1,400-$2,100 in CA) + Workman's Comp.

My advice for you Santa is to set your business up the right way in the beginning. Get the proper Insurance, equipment (cleaning supplies as they become expensive), professional marketing materials, and MOST of all invest in "Quickbooks".

When you do all that, you then do some simple math and figure in all of your proposed overhead. Simple division, and you can move forward with how much you should charge.

Whew......sorry for the long answer but it's a little more complicated than to just "Clean" foreclosed homes/properties.......if you want to do it the right way anyway!!

Best of luck!!!
Web Reference: http://www.weberhomes.INFO
4 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Sep 16, 2009
My office primarily list foreclosures. Most asset managers and banks have set amounts that they are willing to pay for pre-listing cleans and monthly cleans. Try to find out so you don't price your self out of work.

Get your deal...I can refer you to a foreclosure agent anywhere in the country, just contact me!
Marci Yankelov-Realtor
Honored as one of "2008 Top 50 Realtors on the Rise" across the U.S. by Real Estate magazine
Mount Vernon Realty
Direct:443-858-9113
3 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Jul 8, 2010
Hello,





My name is Elzir Trindade, I am emailing you on behalf of Crystal Clear Services Inc. The purpose of this email is to express our interest in cleaning the bank owned Homes, mentioned in your ad. Our company has over ten years of experience cleaning in that capacity, and can certainly fulfill all the requirements expressed in the ad.

We are able to use our own cleaning supplies and also send you the before and after pictures of the property. My partner, Gehan Elgamal and I want to discuss this further. Please email back, or call me at 301-461-6364, or Gehan at 240-552-4107. Thank you for your time and consideration. Look forward to working with you in the future.


Kind regards, Elzir Trindade

Crystal Clear Services Inc.
ccservices@usa.com
We also do swimming pool repair and renovation
Flag Wed Nov 20, 2013
https://www.facebook.com/beltwayexpress
Flag Sat Aug 31, 2013
https://www.facebook.com/beltwayexpress
Flag Sat Aug 31, 2013
How much do the "average" clean out cost for a forclosure, per room etc... in Baltimore,Md? I am in Hanover, Pa and am planning on starting to do clean outs as i am out of a job, Figured it would be a good/cheap start up, Thanks for any information.
Flag Wed Jul 10, 2013
Hello, my name is Kory and I am trying to start up a reo/foreclosure contract company baised on the high demand here in jacksonville fl. Im very new to the game. I worked as an employee of a company and saw the huge profit potential. I recently came into the start up money and wondered if maybe you could send me a few pointers on how to go about the bidding process. I am very familure with the lawn care and securing work aspect but not so much the clean out or convey aspects. Your input would be very much appreciated. My email is koryblue24@yahoo.com . Who knows maybe one day I could return the favor. Thanks Kory
Flag Mon Apr 8, 2013
Your charge should depend on several things. You should first take into consideration how long it is going to take to clean out the property. Be reasonable and expedient so that you will not be tied up with this property for too long and can move on to the next one. After you realized how long it will take, you have to thing about the cost of a dumpster and/or the disposal cost of getting rid of the items in the property. You also have to take into consideration how many workers it is going to take to assist you.

With this and other cost that may come into play, you will have to charge your client whatever your cost was plus an additional charge to cover a profit. No one wants to break even! Also remember, do not charge the maximum price that almost everyone stated with this response. Be fair and be able to get more deals. People want to save money and you want to make money. If everyone is charging me $2500 and someone comes along at a lower price to do the same thing, I am going to jump on the lower cost.

Market yourself as a great quality worker with an inexpensive price. You have to learn to target the frugal buyers.
3 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Feb 16, 2010
Actually cleaning foreclosed homes is a great money maker. Homes being sold by sellers, foreclosures and buyers that just purchased need your services. You should call some cleaning companies in your area to figure out how they charge and how much. This way, you can price your services accordingly and beat out the competition.

I hope this answer helped you.

Rhonda Holt
Full Time Top Sales Agent
Specializing In Co-ops and Home Sales
Weichert Realtors, H.P Greenfield
1712 Utica Avenue,
Brooklyn, New York
Cell: 646-725-5941
My Site: http://www.RhondaHolt.com
Email: HelpMeRhonda1919@Yahoo.com
*JOIN ME ON TWITTER.COM AT: http://www.twitter.com/helpmerhonda09
Web Reference: http://www.Kandhhomes.com
2 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Feb 20, 2010
Hello,





My name is Elzir Trindade, I am emailing you on behalf of Crystal Clear Services Inc. The purpose of this email is to express our interest in cleaning the bank owned Homes, mentioned in your ad. Our company has over ten years of experience cleaning in that capacity, and can certainly fulfill all the requirements expressed in the ad.

We are able to use our own cleaning supplies and also send you the before and after pictures of the property. My partner, Gehan Elgamal and I want to discuss this further. Please email back, or call me at 301-461-6364, or Gehan at 240-552-4107. Thank you for your time and consideration. Look forward to working with you in the future.


Kind regards, Elzir Trindade

Crystal Clear Services Inc.
ccservices@usa.com
Also we do swimming pool service repair and renovation .if you know some property in
MD,VA. DC we be happy to do it
Thank you
Flag Wed Nov 20, 2013
It all depends on the size of the property and how much stuff there is to clean out. On an average here in MA for a Single Family house with 5 rooms, a clean out is about $750. They quoted that based on $150 per room. This price is running a little high but it is 5 rooms full of junk. They will clean out stuff in the bathroom, closets in the mudroom, etc.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 3, 2010
Call some other cleaning companies and ask them what they are charging in your area. Your competition can be your best source of information.
Web Reference: http://www.soreal.biz
2 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 3, 2010
If using HUD guidelines, know these tables are the maximum HUD will generally pay the primary contractor of a foreclosure cleanup job. As a smaller foreclosure cleanup company, you have to know where you are on the totem pole in getting paid. You just can't look at the HUD charts and use those figures for bidding, or you'll overbid. We wrote the book on foreclosure cleanup pricing, literally, dissecting these tables. Remember, HUD pricing guidelines for foreclosure cleanup are what HUD will pay, max, for a service (though certain scenarios will permit them to go higher with substantiating information), but that $$ is for the primary foreclosure cleanup contractor.

As a smaller foreclosure cleanup company you have to know where you are on that totem pole in getting paid -- and you have to know how to figure that out.

Anybody can price, but pricing "for profit" is an art, so plan to do your research and price to keep $$ in your pocket for your foreclosure cleanup jobs.

Good luck with your business, Santa!

Cassandra
2 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 6, 2009
Can anyone tell me what insurance does a person who is doing this type of work in NYC would need?
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 13, 2014
Depends on who you get started with. I am working with a local assett management company and a few of the highlights are $25 a cut for the lawn, once a week. Initial cleans are $300 for single family homes, apartments/condos pay $250 and it varies with other services. I started this as a part time business, am licensed and insured and doing pretty well, it could turn into much more!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue May 17, 2011
what is the type of insurance one needs for this type of work?
Flag Wed Jul 9, 2014
Are you still doing well in this business or has it changed since you last wrote this? My husband and I are trying to start something similar in Houston. Any additional information would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you.
Flag Tue Jul 31, 2012
Great info! What business license do you have or what should I get in say OHIO to upstart a biz similar to yours?

thanks
Flag Tue Apr 3, 2012
While there are a ton of resources out there to give you advice, I would caution you before you jump head first into the endeavor. Like any real estate related business, you are going to experience some pretty serious and bone jarring cycles in the rehab clean-out business.

There are folks that have been involved in real estate in one capacity or another and they have jumped on the opportunity which at first providing a very good profit margin. As with any business, margins keep getting smaller and smaller...there is still work out there, but it is becoming a commodity more and more, every day.

While it is a good short-term solution, please be careful not to put too much time and energy into starting or maintaining a company that does this sort of work. You can expect banks to to present, what may appear to be, a great price on a house, but once the relationship is moving forward they will reel in your profits in little ways...just be careful.

The other problem is that this is not a long-term strategy...with all of the companies popping up all over the place it is only a matter of time before your profit margin erodes even more. I honestly don't mean to be as negative as I am being, but I have already seen more than one savvy investor lose even more money by getting into the foreclosure clean out business.

Keep your head about you and pay attention to what is going on and you can make some decent money at it, just be realistic about the business and recognize when things begin to turn south.

Good Luck and God Bless!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Fri Feb 19, 2010
Have you cleaned out any houses that were not in foreclosure ? You should estimate the time it will take you to clean out and the price of dumpsters. When you quote a price , go and look at the place and base it on how much junk they have.
Web Reference: http://www.gitabantwal.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Thu Feb 18, 2010
Depending where the home is and who is the bank that owns it will determine what the owner/bank will pay. Keep in mind the banks that own these homes are frugal (cheap) There were 2 homes in Hillsborough, Ca that were bank owned and both price close to 2 M - they were filthy, It was shocking....One could argue that they would sell no matter, however Hillsborough Ca????
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 17, 2010
The average in teh DC area is about $500 for a filthy house.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 8, 2009
if theres a lot of trash,that wouldnt even start to cover expense where i live
Flag Fri Dec 14, 2012
that wouldnt even cover expenses here if lots of trash
Flag Fri Dec 14, 2012
It is all depends who is paying! We usually pay $ 100.00 per house, but it is coming from the broker's pocket not the banks
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 4, 2009
I am reo specialist in northern Ky and most of the companies I deal with also want 2-3 bids. My partner also has a trash out business. In the homes we see it is a bases to bases, We have had bids 2200 for homes where the trashout people had to use snow shovels to get all the dog stuff out. We take the pictures send them to the assest managers and go from there. It is interesting to see all the trashout companies rise up out of nowhere. Lately the banks tend to put bid that looks more professional and includes other services, initial lawn care etc. It is all interesting.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Sep 16, 2009
Each particular job would require its own estimate. You can start at a basic base charge for the job depending on how big it is and then charge an hourly rate. Only you know how much work you will do and how much you require as payment
1 vote Thank Flag Link Fri Jul 24, 2009
If you are already in the business of cleaning houses then you should charge the same amount as you charge your other clients. Whether a property has been foreclosed on or not should not affect the price you charge. It is the work that is involved that should be the only determining factor. If you are not yet in the business then I recommend that you do some research and check out your comptetion. You are in business and pricing and quoting a job based on competitive prices is really what business is all about. Good luck.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Fri Oct 3, 2008
It all depends on how much work is involved. You need to set a fee schedule such as $55 an hour and 1 hour minum. then break down initial lawn care, weekly lawn care, interior trash out, exterior trash out, repairs, maintenance, floor cleaning, c arpet removal, dumpster fees and such. The key to getting a job from a broker and being able to keep getting jobs is beiong priced right, going the extra mile and providing that extra effort to detail and most important is the broker has to pay for these fees up front and wait to get reimbursed by the bank 30-90 days so set up a payment plan or be flexable with getting paid by the broker, that is just as important as the price you charge. good luck
Web Reference: http://www.ScottSellsNH.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 27, 2008
You should charge a fair price by the hour because some homes are in terrible condition, having been damaged and/or neglected while others have been left in very good condition and just need a typical cleaning. There should not be one set price because your time and effort will not be equal for every home. Good luck.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Fri Sep 26, 2008
Hi my name is Brandi, I recently just started working for a contractor doing forclosed clean outs. I get paid a flat rate of $70. I provide my own cleaning supplies and gas. These houses can take up to 5-8 hrs to clean. And im curious if im clearly being ripped off
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 12, 2014
you are only worth what you charge, that said, you are being ripped off.
Flag Mon Dec 22, 2014
WHAT DO YOU CHARGE FOR THE THE FINAL CLEAN OF A FORCLOSURE HOME
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Sep 18, 2014
If people want to sell their home, they need to clean it up. We are not their keeper! Stop blaming the agent when your house doesn't sell.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun May 4, 2014
As far as seeing what everyone else has been charging on an average anywhere from $15 up to $50 a cubic yard .. That is just to remove and dump materials and debri .. So if you have 10 yards charge $150to$500.. all depends what your willing to work for and what they will pay .. as far as cleaning i would go with a flat rate of$100 to $200 average size home .
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Apr 17, 2014
How much can I charge for cleaning & maintenance work on R.E.O. in Birmingham, Al.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Mar 18, 2014
https://www.facebook.com/beltwayexpress

NEW COMPANY OPENING OCTOBER 1ST 2013
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Aug 31, 2013
How much money should a property prservation buissnes be paying me to clean a forclosed home
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Jun 21, 2013
I already work for a property preservation company.I make only $10.00 an hour no matter how big the job is.And i have a short time to finish it no matter how big.Should i be getting paid more money?
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Jun 21, 2013
What is the current going rate in Atlanta Georgia for Agent owned and leased residential property for services provided being that of general cleaning for move in condition?
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat May 18, 2013
To whom it may concern i'm a new cleaning business owner in need to no how much to charge for foreclosure home
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Dec 10, 2012
Call the realtors who list them and ask what they are paying.
You can find foreclosure realtors on foreclosuresus .com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2012
Come try to trash my house out , you will and your men will get a couple of fast moving lead projectiles , sounds profitable , kiss your wife and kids goodbye maggott
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Jan 11, 2012
Knowing how to price your jobs accurately can be the difference between lasting in this business or being out of work and ultimately quitting this business. Most banks use the Hud and Va guidelines to help them set their price ranges, they are very detailed and can be found online. You can charge more for your work than these rates, however you will need to back up these increased prices with plenty of before and after pictures. Also, Jane is right, your competition can be one of your best resources, find out what the competition is charging.

Also, know who you are bidding for. Realtors "Reo' agents will be paying for this out of there own pocket and are always concerned with cash flow, offering the Realtors that handle Reo properties a discount can help and possibly get you more work.

Another thing to remember, there is HEAVY billing involved and if you do not stay on top of your billing to the banks and asset management companies, you will not get paid ontime. Banks and Asset Management Companies pay on average from 45 to 60 days when billed properly.

There are several variables when it comes to pricing: 1. The Size of the Property 2. How many square feet the residence is 3. How large of a job it is "ie. average or massive trashout"

Heather Paul
Coldwell Banker
424-625-1037
http://www.SantaMonicaWestsideDreamHomes.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 2, 2010
As much as they will pay you. Take cash only.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Oct 4, 2010
All those who spoke about the HUD guidelines are correct. I am not sure by your question if you mean the actual cleaning of the home, or trash-out, or trash out and clean. Most of my lenders have limits that they will pay up to. Also, many, many lenders now use preservation companies to do this kind of work. You might think about signing up with them. There is a approval process and at time's all the work with REO subjects, means, paper, paper, paper and reports. A large preservation company is Safeguard. Try doing a search on the internet for preservation company / bank owned / asset management.....I think you will find many leads, just keep putting it in different ways. I do have to warn you, some of the homes are in pretty disgusting shape.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Jul 8, 2010
Greetings Santa,

In Cottonwood, Arizona they are charging between $15.00-$20.00 per hour. Every state is different but I do want to you know that I have been to your wonderful area and had a pleasant time.

Sincerely,
Sandra J Steele
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 27, 2010
Get a copy of the Hud and Fannie Mae pricing guidelines-
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Mar 20, 2010
Before you open your doors, you must learn to price effectively so your company can make a PROFIT... industry with thin profit margins. You will make your money in bulk and repeat business. Helpful article below: "How to Effectively Price Foreclosure Cleanup Jobs So Your Company Can Make a Profit" ...

Cassandra, Foreclosure Cleanup, LLC, Atlanta, GA
Web Reference: http://bit.ly/beua4i
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Feb 22, 2010
Here in georgia,I only charge $400 for a forclosure clean out here in georgia.My number is 6786355447 if you have any questions and my name is james
Flag Thu Sep 5, 2013
$1.00 a square foot is pretty standard, depending on ther scope of work. As low as $.30 a square foot for smaller jobs. Make sure you always take before and after pictures and carry proper bonding and insurance!

Jared West
Broker
Team West Real Estate
www,TeamWestRE.com
512-296-0669
Web Reference: http://www.TeamWestRE.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Feb 21, 2010
$25 per hour. Make sure you have liability insurance, you also might want to get bonded.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Feb 20, 2010
Call around-- you may need to charge extra in some cases for the disposal of somethings that may be left behind.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Feb 18, 2010
How do I get into this business? Who do I contact at the banks in order to get the jobs?
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Feb 8, 2010
This should be based on the size of the home and the amount of work needed. Use a flat rate and then add for the size and work required for the job. Also, found out what other vendors are charing in your area.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 11, 2009
I've already posted an answer to your question, and I encourage new readers to review that post.

You asked "What should I charge to clean foreclosed homes?"

You didn't ask: "What will HUD allow?" Doesn't matter what HUD allows. You asked what you should charge. You should charge enough to cover your costs and make a reasonable profit. I've seen plenty of instances in which the government sets maximum rates for products or services. Sometimes those figures are reasonable. Often they're not. The HUD figures don't reflect what your costs are. At best, they may reflect some national or regional averages.

You didn't ask: "What do foreclosure Realtors pay?" If you read the answers immediately below, you'll see answers of $2,500, $500, and $100. Give me a break! I can tell you that if you charge $100, you'll go broke almost immediately. Beyond that, though, your question was "What should I charge to clean foreclosed homes?" Not: "What do others pay?" Broken record here, but you should charge enough to cover your costs and make a reasonable profit. You can define "reasonable" however you want. But you have to start from a base of covering your costs.

You didn't ask: "How much should I undercut the competition?" One answer here suggests finding out what your competition charges, then pricing a bit lower. Wrong. Your competition's cost structure may be entirely different from yours. You asked: "What should I charge?" Broken record here, but what you should charge is enough to cover your costs (not the costs your competitor may have) and make a reasonable profit (the definition of which may be different with you and your competitor.)

I keep repeating: "enough to cover your costs." That means knowing what your costs are. Knowing how much you're worth per hour. Knowing how long a specific job will take, and it'll vary greatly. My original post provides more details.

And one good piece of advice from several other posters here: It doesn't matter whether you're cleaning up a foreclosure or another type of property. Your time is your time. The value of your time is its value.

Look: There's plenty of great advice below:

Cassandra: "Anybody can price, but pricing "for profit" is an art, so plan to do your research and price to keep $$ in your pocket for your foreclosure cleanup jobs."

Terry: "It depends on the amount of debris. The kind of debris. What size dumpster you need and how many would be where you start. Then if there is just trash this is light weight and perhaps one or two people can clean this out and take a few hours. So you would determine what you think a person would be paid per hour. If it is a lot of heavy furniture, etc you would increase due to the manpower you would need."

Kathy: "My advice for you Santa is to set your business up the right way in the beginning. Get the proper Insurance, equipment (cleaning supplies as they become expensive), professional marketing materials, and MOST of all invest in "Quickbooks". When you do all that, you then do some simple math and figure in all of your proposed overhead. Simple division, and you can move forward with how much you should charge."

Jeff and Ginny: "You should charge a fair price by the hour because some homes are in terrible condition, having been damaged and/or neglected while others have been left in very good condition and just need a typical cleaning. There should not be one set price because your time and effort will not be equal for every home."

Bill: "Your fee for this service should strongly depend on the scope of the work needed."

I apologize if I've left out other advice along the same lines.

Hope that helps.

P.S. I've put a link below to an association representing janitorial and custodial companies. They have some good information on bidding and estimating.
Web Reference: http://www.bscai.org
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 11, 2009
Don Tepper, Real Estate Pro in Fairfax, VA
MVP'08
Contact
Use the Hud guidlines! I have been selling REO properties for over 10 years and the HUD guidlines are the structure and verification that asset management conpanies use.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 4, 2009
http://www.crazyaboutcleaning.net
Flag Wed Dec 4, 2013
Hi Steve,
My name is Amy Andersen I am the owner of Crazy About Cleaning. I provide move-in/out and residential cleaning in the DuPage County area. My rates are reasonable and I have good referendes. Thanks for the feedback on this question. Very helpful.
Flag Wed Dec 4, 2013
It depends on the amount of debris. The kind of debris. What size dumpster you need and how many would be where you start. Then if there is just trash this is light weight and perhaps one or two people can clean this out and take a few hours. So you would determine what you think a person would be paid per hour. If it is a lot of heavy furniture, etc you would increase due to the manpower you would need.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 4, 2009
Some very good and some very bad answers here.

First, anyone who throws out a flat number is wrong. You'll find that jobs vary from simple and quick to complicated and time-consuming.

Second, be skeptical of anyone who says, "I think..." or "In my opinion..." It has nothing to do with opinion.

Third, while it's interesting to know what your competition might be charging, it has absolutely nothing to do with what you charge. Nothing. Nada. Zilch.

So, what's the answer? Very, very simple. You determine what your time is worth per hour. $15? $20? $25? $30? That's totally up to you. Then you determine how many hours it'll take you to clean the property. Multiply hours needed by hour hourly rate. Add in any supplies you need. (In most commercial cleaning companies, labor is about 70% of total cost. Supplies typically are about 10%.) The number you come up with is your base price. Charge any less and you'll be underpricing yourself.

Note that this figure won't take into account your overhead and marketing expenses. Those may be minimal, but most folks tend to underestimate those. For instance, cleaners who work out of their home figure they can charge a lot less because they don't have space they're renting somewhere else. For instance, cleaners often forget to factor in time they spend marketing, developing estimates, viewing properties. As a professional, you need to add that time and that expense onto your estimate.

And stick to your guns. If you calculate that a fair charge to clean a home (based on the number of hours it'll take and what you've determined to be a fair hourly rate) is $400 and you're met with: "I've got a bid of $325. If you can match it, you can have the job," your answer is simple and clear: No. If someone else thinks they can do it for $325, let 'em. Maybe they can. Maybe they can't. Maybe they're willing to work for less than you. Maybe they've underestimated the time it'll take. Doesn't matter. What matters is how long it'll take and what you feel you're worth per hour. Period.

Look: I worked for an association representing building service contractors (Building Service Contractors Association International) for eight years, conducted research surveys and wrote books on bidding and estimating (among other things)--feel free to look them up on Amazon. The only factors are the time involved and what you're worth per hour. All the rest are meaningless distractions.

Hope that helps.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Sep 16, 2009
Don Tepper, Real Estate Pro in Fairfax, VA
MVP'08
Contact
I think it depends on how much stuff you have to remove. The last clean up I did was only $350...and I get a good discount since I also use this guy for yard service. Get an estimate from different contractors.

Charita King
Century 21 My Real Estate Co.
562-276-8681
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Sep 15, 2009
In my opinion it depend on the size of the property and what kind of clean up are going to provide to your client, it is common sense.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Sep 14, 2009
You may want to look at your competitors rate and compare your price with them and give padding to your rates, meaning lower your rates a little bit lower than your competitor, that way you can be safe...
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Sep 14, 2009
If you want business, you should price fairly! If your in the business you should know how long it would take you and how much it will cost you. I would have a itemized list for your clients to check off so you know exactly what they want and give a fair price for the items. Integrity pays off in the long run. Hope this helps.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Sep 14, 2009
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