Home Buying in Walnut Creek>Question Details

Doug, Home Buyer in Walnut Creek, CA

Attending Real Estate Offer?

Asked by Doug, Walnut Creek, CA Tue Feb 12, 2008

When my real estate agent makes an offer to the seller's agent, am I, the buyer, allowed to attend the offer as an observer?

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>>>> "For example, after my agent presents the offer, the seller's agent would look at the price and laugh out loud saying, "what are you crazy?!". Then my agent would come back to me and tell me more diplomatically that the offer wasn't accepted. Is that the kind of talk that might happen during an offer? "


Doug,

Thats pretty darn close .l.o.l.. keep in mind, "just observing" really doesn't help.

That said, there's nothing wrong with going into the 2nd or maybe the 3rd offer "*if*" you know what you're doing and your not satisfied with the agents at hand ... it all depends on the communication.

Sometimes the buyers agents is intimidated by the sellers agent - or vice versa .. maybe the sellers agent is trying to prove a point to the seller, or perhaps the seller is way off on his/her pricing and the sellers agent is just waiting for time to come to their rescue .. you never know unless you get involved.

But there's a big difference between getting involved and "just looking" .. if you feel confident with the players at the table, stay your hand and don't get involved ... if you feel the agents aren't doing their job(s) in a very timely fashion and you're hearing a lot of static on both ends, then it's fine to make an appointment with everyone involved with the seller and negotiate your own deal - I've done it many times.

Good luck and happy hunting.!
2 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 13, 2008
Doug, I think what most have answered is "Is it wise for me to attend the offer meeting?" For most buyers, that answer is no for the reasons already covered.

But to answer your specific question, "are you allowed?" - the answer is yes. There is no legal reason for any of the other parties to deny your presence at an offer presentation. The seller or seller's agent might protest to your agent that they don't want you there, but they cannot prevent you from coming. Now should you still attend, they could walk out and refuse to do business with you in the room. They might not do that if you really are their only choice of offers. Even if you get through all this, then you, quite possibly, have put the seller in a frame of mind of confrontation vs. you - and that's probably something you don't want to have happen.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 13, 2008
ELV!S, I talked to my agent, and it turns out that they are going to present to the other agent AND seller for exactly the reasons you described. Apparently in a seller's market this is not done generally, but in a soft market it is since there are so few offers. I wish I could be a fly on the wall there just out of curiousity, but I suppose it's best left alone. Thanks.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 13, 2008
"So, you can tell your buyer's agent that you want to attend, but that's no guarantee that the seller will agree."

This is going to be an offer to the seller's agent not the seller. Then the seller's agent will go back to seller to explain the offer to them. So I don't see why the seller has any say whether I'm there. But I imagine I would need permission from the seller's agent to attend.

I am happy with my buyer's agent, and I'm sure they'll say no way, so it probably doesn't matter at this point.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 13, 2008
Doug,

You are also assuming that your agent will actually be face to face with not only the other agent, but the seller.

Most often your offer is faxed after advising the listing agent that the offer is on it's way and covering all the basics and your rationale for the offered price.

I have only pushed to present the offer in person to the Seller once. It was a competitive bid situation and I wanted to put a face on the offer plus be able to reinforce why my clients were the best offer. I also had some latitude to negotiate on the spot to close the deal if possible, plus my clients were waiting at the other end of my cell phone if we went outside my approved negotiation envelope.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 13, 2008
Doug,
Unless you are making a "full price offer" I would recommend remaining in the distance. Since the negotiation process can be an emotional experience it is best to leave it to the agent who's professional services compensation also covers this "hazardous duty."

Your presence could be counter productive!

The "Eckler Team"
Century 21 Almar & Associates
Venice, Fl 34285
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 13, 2008
I guess they'll probably tell me no way, but I'll ask anyway. I've always wondered what it's like, and since I'm not a real estate agent, this is basically my only chance to find out. If I did go, I would promise not to say a thing. But I guess for the agents it would be too awkward. A shame though, because I'm really curious.

Is it possible it's not recommended because the seller's agent could be so rude as to embarrass me? For example, after my agent presents the offer, the seller's agent would look at the price and laugh out loud saying, "what are you crazy?!". Then my agent would come back to me and tell me more diplomatically that the offer wasn't accepted. Is that the kind of talk that might happen during an offer? Again, I'm just curious, that's all.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 13, 2008
Hi Doug:

Most of the time, the buyers do not go and attend the offer. The reason is because buying a home can be a pretty emotional situation and buyers are not normally trained to handle the presentation and negotiation of an offer. This is true of the sellers - why we generally suggest that sellers should not be present when showing houses.

I would suggest that your agent be there to present the offer and to let the seller / listing agent know about your background (both personal and financial and why the property is such a great move for you). I normally write a letter to accompany that.

Sylvia
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 13, 2008
Sylvia Barry,…, Real Estate Pro in Novato, CA
MVP'08
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It's generally not recommended. You can alway ask your agent to see if he/she feels comfortable with it. In turn, she'll see if the seller's agent is open. In the hundreds of offers I've written, I've never had a buyer attend. I've also never had a buyer ask to attend an offer presentation. I have presented however to seller's and their agent directly in a formal offer situation on my buyer's behalf.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 13, 2008
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