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Patti Philli…, Real Estate Pro in Carlsbad, CA

When agents on the other side of the transaction don't do their jobs- what do you do?

Asked by Patti Phillips, Carlsbad, CA Sat Sep 1, 2007

Patrick's post regarding Redfin got me thinking- we have all been there- bad agents, lazy agents, clueless agents, attorneys who are "going to represent themselves" ie, get the commission and let us do both sides of the transaction- we want to get our seller's property closed, but how do you all draw the line on doing twice the work for 1/2 of the commission?

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16
Ruth
You`re killing me
If that were the case, of course we would all do that.
Except me.
I would buy the house for a 100K by using a 20K line of credit.
Collect my 3K commission.

Close my Million dollar deal and collect my 30k commission.

Pay off my line of credit with my 30K commission.

Rent the shack out for positive cash flow, until I could sell it for 120K

That's why that agent is selling million dollar homes
4 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
Mr.P, Other/Just Looking in Arizona
MVP'08
Excellent question Patti. It is very difficult and time consuming to do the work of other agents. I agree with Linette, if the agent is new, it helps everyone to give them a hand. If it is a seasoned agent not doing their job I have less tolerance. I like Diane's idea about asking for a fee. That should get them back on track! Nice thread.
3 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
Well, we do it for them.

Whatever it takes... At the end of the day, I want a smooth closing for everyone involved. I'm too busy to get upset over lazy agents and half-a*#& companies. We all know they provide poor service.

I enjoy the feeling that results when I save the day. It's what I love about this job :)
3 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
I didn't think I had anything to say on this topic and just wanted to eavesdrop. However, by reading I thought of one of my favorite stories about a neighbor who wasn't happy with her agent. My neighbor's house was under contract for lets say $100k. She had a contract to purchase a $200k home contingent on the sale of her home. That home owner had a contract with contingency on a $300k home. Next was a $500k and a $1 mil home. If the $100k home fell through, all the others would too. So the listing agent for the million dollar home walked the agents for the $100k home through the process. That's why that agent is selling million dollar homes.
Ruth
Ruth
3 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
Ruthless, Other/Just Looking in 60558
MVP'08
Patti, Geez, never heard THAT question before (gufaw, gufaw!!). I just grin and bear it. My only issue Iis with standard of care and making sure all disclosures are properly disclosed and SIGNED in a TIMELY manner!! I can't tell you how many times I get an agent's disclosure the day before escrow closes. In the great State of California the buyer has 3 days upon receipt to bail if they find an item they dispute. You folks won't belive this but lately we've had MANY stories of unlicensed agents presenting offers alledgely for their "broker". The hutzpuh of these aassistants and gents is amazing. We had a broker here in our County, well known, does a lot of business, actually have his UNLICENSED ASSISTANT write and present an offer and put his name in the spot for the agent. When we confronted him on his actions he tried to stonewall us. So we DID NOT PAY THEM!! A non-licensee is NOT able to collect commissions. The broker didn't object at all as he knew we had him dead to rights!! The EO (executive officer) of our Association, if she doesn't recognize a name from an agent requesting contracts from our store, will pull up the person's name on our data base and/or with DRE if no name is under the Realtor list. When the market was a rockin' this happened at an alarming rate. I check the license status of EVERY agent I work with!
3 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
...then I do it for them. I do whatever it takes to put the deal together and that's why I get paid the big bucks.

Unfortunately, you do not always get to select the agent you work with. And there are now so many agents out there, most are not going to pull their weight.

So... sometimes you have to do the other agents job to get your clients escrow closed... so be it.
3 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
It is higly annoying to have either a lazy or incompetent agent on the other end of the transaction, however I can't help but lick my chops in these instances. While I often get stuck opening doors for their inspectors or chasing them for paperwork , I know that I will absolutely take such agents to the cleaners in negotiations. If the agent is new particularly, you can almost affect a mentor/pupil type relationship during the transaction. There is no better position from which to cement your client's best interests than as the authority figure.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Sep 2, 2007
Patti some interesting comments. I use a transaction managment system that informs the other agent what is due and what they have missed. This keeps excellent records if properly used.

I know we are bound by what is offered in the MLS, but there should be some way to penalize lazy agents. Perhaps an addendum in the contract.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
Depends on how horrible the situation is - I will help the other agent to keep the escrow going if it makes sense to do so for my client's sake.

Usually you will find the clueless one or the lazy one very thankful to you because they know they should not even be there. The bad ones, you might have to pull the Broker out of the box. Some you just advise your clients not even to deal with the transaction because it coudl be rotten. .

I had to send an offer back because they agent could not even fill out the first page. The agent is a mortgage brokers trying to double end as a real estate agent. She sent in a contract saying the buyer is going to put 20% down and what not. From our conversation, it's a 100% financing with credit back. I asked her," Are you sure of this? I don't think this is what you said your cliens wanted to do". Her reply was : 'Oh, I copied everyting down from another realtor's contract. I thought I had it all correctt". I sent it back, she never did send the revised contract back.

There is another case where I was the listing agent, and the buyer agents was a discount broker. The buyer was so angry with the none negotiation; they startaed to email me asking for my help. I could not as I represent the sellers. We closed with buyers broker compensating the buyers for certain things. Now the buyer is calling me because they may sell.

I will always go to inspections or appraisals whether I am the listing agent or selling agent because it is benefiical for my clients if I know what the inspector / appraisers say. Sometimes the buyers agent won't even show up for inspection.

Bottom line is - Just make sure you do your side of the job and more to protect your clients!

Sylvia
2 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
Sylvia Barry,…, Real Estate Pro in Novato, CA
MVP'08
Contact
That is a fantastic question! Regrettably, in the market we're currently experiencing here in Sacramento, you're best bet is to just grin and bear it. We feel that most agents are not going to intentionally be a hassle. We also feel it's in our best interest to not let on too much to our seller's that the other agent is being less than accomodating. It only serves to raise the level of animosity and that tends to just hamper any negotiating further along in the transaction.

We try to rationalize the behavior of the other agent to ourselves so that we can, in the end, better serve our clients by best achieving the end they want (or need in most cases), and if that includes doing a little extra work that maybe we shouldn't have to do, so be it. Luckily we love our job!
2 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
Yup, it sucks, but nonetheless, you do whatever you need to do to support and represent your client. If there is a broker on the other side, you can let them know what is going on and try to get their help. As long as it is not a pattern occurrence, just chalk it up to the territory and keep movin' on. Not every deal can be a perfect one.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
I have nothing to add to the conversation other than EXCELLENT QUESTION!!! Thumbs up!
Ruth
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
Ruthless, Other/Just Looking in 60558
MVP'08
I know my job and my responsibilities. I do my job, not theirs. I will, of course, offer to help them out for a fee! Luckily this doesn't happen too much in my area, but when it does, I stand my ground. At no time do I ever compromise my clients' position though.
Web Reference: http://www.dianeglander.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
Patti:

I grumble, and end up doing the other agent's job to best serve my client's interests.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Jan 18, 2008
Roberta Murp…, Real Estate Pro in San Diego, CA
MVP'08
Contact
It is a real catch 22.

I learned from a great Realtor, to always blame your Broker.

Sorry Deborah.

I am sorry, ( smile) my Broker( Great Guy) says that is actually a conflict of interest.
I can not do that ( smile) Sorry.

The flip side is that I will never let a deal die, due to some cracker jack real estae slug.

When you call on one of my listings, I do say. "Tell me what I can do, to help you put this deal together"
No I do not mean your job.

I like Gary`s idea about addendums. I will bring that up to my broker next time.

EXCELLENT QUESTION!!! ( wink)
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
Mr.P, Other/Just Looking in Arizona
MVP'08
My opinion: If an agent is a seasoned agent and they are not doing their job , it effects your client. Discuss it with your Broker and see if they will speak with the broker of the other agent . If the agent is a new agent, try and help them through the transaction. If you show them the way to do it correctly, everyone gains in the end.
If an attorney decides that he/she is going to represent himself in a transaction and all that needs to be done is not, send an email or letter (have letter approved by your broker) informing him or her of the missing issues and keep a copy on file. Possibly, keep a check list handy that you can send along, with what has been completed and what has not.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2007
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