Rentals in Stratford>Question Details

Eliot Walker, Renter in Stratford, CT

I need a 3- 4 br rent with option to buy in Stratford

Asked by Eliot Walker, Stratford, CT Sun Jul 22, 2012

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Ron Thomas’ answer
Lease/Option
You are desperate!
Your Credit or Finances, or both, will not allow you to go the conventional route:
You need the Seller to help you out!

The Seller will know it, and you are going to pay dearly for this service:
There aren't too many altruistic Sellers out there.

The terms that can be written into a Lease/Option can be dangerous to you:
How long is the Option period?
How much money are you putting in to the Option?
What happens if you are not able to execute the Option?
How do you know what your financial situation will be 2-5 years from now?
How much is the rent in the meantime?
Who will be responsible for maintenance and repair in the meantime?
What will be the Market Value of the home in 2-5 years?
What will be the Selling price 2-5 years from now?

This is the Ultimate Caveat Emptor!
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Aug 5, 2012
Hi Eliot,
I just want to make sure you are fully aware of all the pros and cons of rent to buy deals. Hope this information helps. Also, what are you looking to pay monthly? I may have a few places in Stratford that would work for you.
Here's how it works: Instead of outright purchasing a property, a potential buyer draws up a contract with a seller in which the monthly rental payments, based on the home's value and often above going rates, count toward an eventual sale. All rental payments made pay down the principle if the renter decides to exercise the pre-paid option--typically 1% of the sale price--to buy. The date at which the agreement expires varies by contract but is typically between two and five years. At that point, the renter can choose to buy the home at the original listed price minus the equity he or she has built. If not, then the homeowner has the option to evict them and keep all payments.
Of course, there are pitfalls. If a renter eventually decides not to buy, not only do his rental payments disappear, but the premium option fee he has paid for the right to buy also evaporates. In addition, if the price of the home goes down considerably over the next three years, then the renter has been paying a rate based on that amount and will find himself overcharged. On top of that, many contracts in rent-to-buy situations disallow late rental payments from counting toward an eventual sale. Those with punctuality problems might lose equity.
They can be helpful for those sitting on the fence but shouldn't be utilized by anyone who isn't serious about eventually buying the home. Rent-to-buy should be made as part of a plan to own a home, otherwise it will end up costing more money in fees and above-market rent payments. Make sure the eventual purchase is driving the decision to enter a rent-to-buy.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Aug 5, 2012
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