Rental Basics in Bushwick>Question Details

Sarah S., Renter in Brooklyn, NY

Is there a limit to how much a landlord can increase the rent when renewing a lease?

Asked by Sarah S., Brooklyn, NY Wed Jun 19, 2013

Our landlord has just informed us that the rent will be raised and equivalent of 20% when we renew the lease. So, now we suddenly have to look for a new 2 bedroom place by August. I've heard they can't raise it more than 7%-11%. Is that true? This is totally out of the blue and I am LIVID!!!

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If the apartment is not Rent Stabilized or Rent Controlled; the landlord CAN raise the rent as much as he/she likes, or not renew the lease at all.
There are no requirements for giving notice, unless as stated it is Rent Stabilized. Your lease expiration date is your notice. But obviously it behooves the landlord to give their tenants to avoid a "No Time" stand off.
If you do feel you need to move, do not let it get to the point of the landlord needing to take you to court, because that record will stay in your profile for every future landlord to see, even though you have the right for an additional six months, it shows you as "uncooperative" and ignoring the terms of your lease by expecting to live beyond it. A lease is for the time limit specified, just as a car lease, or a hotel room booking and you cannot expect an automatic renewal at your desire.
If you are rent stabilized call The Department of Community Renewal (DHCR) the State agency that governs Rent Stabilized apartments.
Yours,
Kathryn Lilly, Broker
Realty on the Greene, LLC
718-858-7600
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Jun 20, 2013
My Landlady noes i Live on a fixed income, of little over 700.00 a month. I am a widow over 50 unable to work because of med. i pay 400.00 for rent now plus lights and gas. Don't drive, and she is uping the rent to 750.00. I am going to be homeless.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Aug 4, 2014
I’m an agent working for ReMax NYC Midtown and I’m always doing my research on property and stay in touch with the best professionals. If you simply need advice please email me at KDrake@remaxnyc.com. I'm experienced with rentals & sale in NYC. I’ve provided links below regarding any concerns you may have.

Finance Advice:
http://www.fpanet.org/LifeGoals/BuyingaHome/

Bank Expertise:
David.Axelrod@bankofAmerica.com

Appraisal Expertise:
LadSurs@gmail.com

Legal Advice:
http://www.lawhelpmn.org/issues/housing/buying-and-owning-a-…

Advice for Buyers:
http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/topics/buying_a_home

Advice for Sellers:
http://www.realestateabc.com/homeselling/

Tax Concerns:
http://www.tax.ny.gov/pit/property/
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 18, 2013
Each year, the Rent Guidelines Board (RGB) establishes the lease guidelines for rent stabilized apartments. Apartments in buildings rehabilitated or newly constructed after January 1, 1974 are not rent regulated unless the owner has taken advantage of special tax abatement programs known as the J-51 and 421-a programs. There are a number of exceptions to these generalizations. Market-Rate Housing includes apartments which have never been regulated and apartments which have undergone deregulation. Vacant apartments in buildings with one to five units are generally not rent regulated.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Jun 20, 2013
Sarah ...Sorry to hear that your having such a problem with your landlord. Don't drive yourself crazy and take a deep breath. Your landlord needs to follow a set steps to make the increase. Your landlord needs to give you and serve you with the following:

The law states: § 2523.5 Notice for renewal of lease and renewal procedure ...(3) The 60-day period from the date of service of the notice for renewal of lease for acceptance and renewal provided to the tenant in subdivision

If you decide that you wish to move someplace else, the landlord just can't raise the rent regardless the amount of apartments in the building. The rules are different for houses that have five or less and more than six apartments... Call me at (374) 362-6080 and I can give the full information. You have at least six months to move and that is by New York State law.. You have the time as long as you pay your rent... Good luck and call me if you need help ... George
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Jun 19, 2013
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