Rental Basics in Connecticut>Question Details

laina1972, Renter in Stafford Springs, CT

Is it legal for my landlord to show my apartment while I am still in it?

Asked by laina1972, Stafford Springs, CT Sat Jul 28, 2012

We had a 1 year lease that expired in November of last year. I told my landlord today that we would be moving out at the end of August. She told me that because I was giving her "short notice" that she would have to charge me, and to get tenants in she would have to "show" my apartment while I was still here. Is that legal??

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6
Laina, the answer to your question is completely governed by your lease, so you'll want to take it out and read through it carefully. If your lease ran out in November of 2011, then there is probably a clause about continuing in the property as a month-to-month tenant. Most often, either party can then terminate the lease in the holdover period with 30 days WRITTEN notice. Check to see if your lease terms are different. As long as you give proper notice as per the terms in the lease, she cannot charge you beyond the notice period given in the lease. "Short notice" would be defined as anything less than the amount of time notated in the lease.

A typical lease will also have a paragraph outlining when a landlord can enter the apartment. Once you have given her written notice that you intend to vacate the property, it is reasonable for her to be able to show it to other prospective tenants WITH reasonable notice and accommodation to you.

Landlord-Tenant law greatly favors the tenant in Connecticut, but the lease agreement governs what happens. If you would like to discuss this further, please give me a call at my office: 860-688-1400. I'd be glad to help you further
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Aug 3, 2012
Laina,

Look at your lease. It may say that you have to give 60 days notice before vacating.
The lease may also say landlord has permission to show the apartment before
vacating unit to prospective tenents.

Anne
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 29, 2012
Thank you for your response,. Problem is I NEVER signed a lease.. I just cant wait to get out of this Mickey Mouse place.
Flag Sun Jul 29, 2012
You may talk to a tenet land lord lawyer . Good luck.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Jul 28, 2012
You can look at it as a m-m tenant - but a "holdover tenant". In that case the terms of the original lease continue. Just because you don't sign anything doesn't mean terms don't exist.

Not all the facts are here of course. If the landlord happens to find a tenant, then the "charges" will be minimal a landlord cannot charge for double rent

They can charge for beyond normal wear and tear etc.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Jul 28, 2012
Hi Laina!

In Connecticut, it is required that the landlord give you 24 hour notice to enter your apartment or a time that is mutually agreed by both landlord and tenant. If there is a emergency in the apartment, the landlord can enter at anytime. I hope these guidelines from the CT judicial website can shed some light on the situation. http://www.jud.ct.gov/Publications/hm031.pdf

As for the short notice, it is required to give 30 days written notice on a month to month lease or if it is different in your lease agreement. Make sure you send your landlord a certified letter stating you are moving out so you have good record. If your landlord does charge you, I would seek legal counsel.

Good Luck!

-Kristina

860.307.9600

http://www.findconnecticuthomes.com

KZack@kw.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Jul 28, 2012
Your landlord is not correct or you have not told us something. Your lease has expired back in Nov. and that means you are now on a month to month lease. You gave over a month notice so if you are on a month to month lease I see no way she can expect more than a months notice. But since you are no longer bound by a written lease some of you rights might be lost. Most leases do address being able to show the property but with some notice. I would tell her she can show it but only with some advanced notice first. A call to a local lawyer might be a good idea for advice.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Jul 28, 2012
Theres nothing else to tell. Actually, truth be told, I NEVER signed a lease. There is nothing in writing anywhere. Now I am nervous...
Flag Sat Jul 28, 2012
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