Rona Fischman, Real Estate Pro in Somerville, MA

I saw a waterproofed basement with vinyl on the floor and walls. Is this a good waterproofing technique? It

Asked by Rona Fischman, Somerville, MA Thu May 7, 2009

was supposed to stop the seepage. The basement also has a sump pump and perimeter drain. The owners say that there was no standing water since the pump went in. But there was dampness on the floor because it had thin concrete. They put this vinyl stuff in to avoid storing things on damp concrete. Should I be worried about what lurks beneath it?

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7
Bring in a water proofing expert who can give you a better idea of this technique as well as other techniques like various sealing solutions and french drains...etc
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Apr 24, 2015
That is an interesting waterproofing technique that I have never heard of before. My sister is planning on getting her basement water proofed as well but I am not sure she is going with that method. You may want to ask a contractor about this and see how well it has worked. http://www.capsbeta.com/concrete-waterproofing
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Apr 23, 2015
It can get the job done but it is not ideal. If you really want to protect your basement I would bring in a professional waterproofing contractor. They will be able to make sure the job is done right. If you are worried about flooding I would also highly recommend flood insurance. These two things together can save you thousands in the case of a flood. http://www.waterproofingsolutions.com.au/
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Dec 19, 2014
Calvin is right, it's not the best technique out there. I would talk to a professional to see what they think about it as well. There are a lot of different methods that they use these days in order to water proof a basement. I have never heard of vinyl being used. http://www.allleakingshowers.com
Flag Mon Apr 6, 2015
I want to look into doing this for myself. I think that this could be worth it. I don't want to take any risks. I want to know that my home will be safe from any water damage. http://www.safeguardwaterproofing.com/waterproofing.php
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Nov 7, 2014
I'm not sure if it is or not! I would talk to a real estate or a construction company to see if it helps with it or not. They should be able to tell you what works and what doesn't. Good luck and I hope you're able to figure everything out! http://www.canningfloorcovering.com.au/products
Flag Thu Dec 4, 2014
Hi Rona,

A new concrete floor really should not cost that much. The advantage to taking out the existing concrete is you can see the conditions underneath. You can then create a proper drainage plane under it and pour a new floor of proper thickness. Not sure about your area but concrete work here is cheap! Removing the existing floor and the vinyl will remove the possibility of the floor being an issue.

The vinyl on the walls would concern me though. I would have a professional foundation company who performs waterproofing look at it.

Emmanuel J. Scanlan
PS Inspection & Property Services LLC
http://www.psinspection.com
214-418-4366 (cell)
TREC License # 7593
International Code Council, Residential Combination Inspector #5247015-R5 (Electrical, Mechanical, Plumbing and Building)
Certified Infrared Thermographer (ASNT-TC1A Standards)
Texas Residential Construction Commission, Third Party Warranty Inspector #1593
Texas Residential Construction Commission, Inspector, County Inspection Program
Texas Department Of Insurance, VIP Inspector # 08507061016
Hayman Residential Engineering Services, Field Technician
CMC Energy - Certified Energy Auditor

Knowledge is power, but sharing knowledge brings peace!!
Web Reference: http://www.psinspection.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu May 7, 2009
The stuff is a textured vinyl, sort of stiff. It was put there in lieu of pouring a thicker floor, because the concrete beneath is about an eigth inch thick. The sump and drain stopped water from getting in, but the floor, apparently, still had damp spots in cracks.

Should I tear it up and bite the bullet and pay for a new floor?

The basement is just for storage. The house is about a hundred years old,
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu May 7, 2009
Hello Rona,

I have never heard of using vinyl as a waterproofing material. Was this a sheet vinyl product, i.e. a vinyl flooring product, or was it some special material?

The material, whatever it is, will have to be applied with a mastic or cement to hold it down. This adhesive would not necessarily be a waterproofing material as none really are meant for that purpose. Additionally you will most likely have voids underneath between the vinyl and concrete surfaces. Water can collect and mold can grow in those voids. If they had damp concrete and managed to lay vinyl over it I would not expect it to stay adhered for long. Look for ripples in the vinyl and loose edges where it may already be lifting.

Anymore details that you can provide?

Emmanuel J. Scanlan
PS Inspection & Property Services LLC
http://www.psinspection.com
214-418-4366 (cell)
TREC License # 7593
International Code Council, Residential Combination Inspector #5247015-R5 (Electrical, Mechanical, Plumbing and Building)
Certified Infrared Thermographer (ASNT-TC1A Standards)
Texas Residential Construction Commission, Third Party Warranty Inspector #1593
Texas Residential Construction Commission, Inspector, County Inspection Program
Texas Department Of Insurance, VIP Inspector # 08507061016
Hayman Residential Engineering Services, Field Technician
CMC Energy - Certified Energy Auditor

Knowledge is power, but sharing knowledge brings peace!!
Web Reference: http://www.psinspection.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu May 7, 2009
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