Property Q&A in Cape Coral>Question Details

Maya Gauvreau, Home Buyer in Bend, OR

What is a Chinese Dry Wall in reference to a home on a canal in Cape Coral? Is this a problem for insurance?

Asked by Maya Gauvreau, Bend, OR Fri Sep 30, 2011

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This question is about this property: http://www.trulia.com/property/1046015962-3923-Embers-Pkwy-W…

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Maya,

Chinese drywall homes are a problem as a result of a drywall shortage following Hurricane Katrina several years ago. When Katrina struck New Orleans and the Mississippi gulf coast causing much devastation, most domestic drywall was diverted there for the rebuilding effort. The nation was undergoing a building boom at the time and this event caused a drywall shortage. Homeowners alleging that they installed contaminated drywall have reported numerous incidents of corroding copper and other metals in their homes. The Florida Department of Health advised homeowners worried about tainted drywall to check copper tubing coils located in air conditioning and refrigeration units for signs of corrosion caused by hydrogen sulfide, as these are usually the first signs of the issue. Under normal circumstances, copper corrosion leaves it a blue/green or dark red color, whereas corrosion as a result of hydrogen sulfide exposure leaves a black ash-like corrosion. Homeowners who have verified that their home contains contaminated Chinese drywall are advised to replace any suspect drywall, as well as any potentially damaged copper electrical wiring, fire alarm systems, copper piping, and gas piping, defective HVAC and appliances.

There are many contractors who claim to renovate Chinese drywall homes properly, but in fact few who go far enough to render the house safe. I would be happy to provide further education regarding Chinese drywall or any other information regarding SW Florida real estate.
Web Reference: http://Hope4HomeBuyers.org
1 vote Thank Flag Link Fri Sep 30, 2011
Hi Maya,
I would try to avoid homes with Chinese drywall for the obvious reasons below. I would be happy to send you similar properties without Chinese drywall via e-mail. Please let me know if I can help.
Have a wonderful day,
Nancy
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Oct 3, 2011
Yes, that defective drywall needs to be completely replaced before that home can be lived in. Here are some blog posts about defective Chinese drywall: http://www.gulfreturns.com/tag/chinese-drywall
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Oct 3, 2011
Hi Maya!

Two main problems with chinese drywall.

1.) It is a health issue and needs to be resolved
2.) After it is resoved it will always have to be disclosed that it was once in the home.

Good points to consider.

Best of luck to you,

Ray Levy
Coldwell Banker Camelot Realty
352-978-8551
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Oct 1, 2011
Maya,
Actually it is a health issue. Insurance will not pay to fix it. I have done a number of blogs on defective drywall over the years. The property with this issue will be priced Way Under any comparable properties because the existing tainted drywall will need to be removed. There are other remediation issues as well. You may want to consider a healthy property.

Debbie Albert, PA
Keller Williams Treasure Coast
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Oct 1, 2011
Hi Maya,

Check this link also: http://www.cpsc.gov/info/drywall/index.html - It should give you some insight on "defective" drywall.

However, I am not sure what you mean by "Chinese Drywall in reference to a home on a canal". "Defective" dry wall is one issue alone. Conversely, there are lots of homes on canals that get insurance. I live on a canal and don’t have a problem getting insurance.

If you would like to discuss further, please feel free to contact me at: tclappcentury21@aol.com.

Looking forward to hearing from you.

Regards,

Therese Clapp
Realtor, MBA, GRI, SFR, AHWD
Century 21 Sunbelt Realty, Inc.
http://www.thereseclapp.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Sep 30, 2011
Hello Maya,


You may want to check out the folloring website. It will give you more information on this defective drywall product.

http://www.chinesedrywall.com/

Good luch with your home purchase.

Nadine Mauro
Highlight Realty
561-414-0864
NadineSellsHouses@gmail.com
http://www.floridahouseseller.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Sep 30, 2011
Maya-

This home has been vacant for a very long time. For the most part the reason is the pricing particularly with regard to the cost of Chinese Drywall premeditation needed. For a very long time no one has been able to get the price lowered to compensate for the cost of remediation. Unfortunately all that glitters is not gold. This property has a great location, but the cost to purchase does not justify the cost of repairs. That is why it has languished for so long.

I do not believe that it would be possible to get insurance on this property as the County Assessor values the properties with this problem so low. There is definitely a hazard!
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Sep 30, 2011
Hi Maya -- I agree with everyone else here that Chinese Drywall is a serious and costly problem. I just wanted to correct a bit of a misconception here. The Chinese Drywall problem is fairly widespread in South Florida for homes built in 2003-2007 but it isn't widespread throughout Florida. Here in Central Florida we see it only occasionally. It is something an inspector is trained to look for but thankfully we don't see it much here.

Louise Warring
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Sep 30, 2011
The chinese drywall is a major issue as explained by Carolyn. It is very expensive remediate the problem so you are better off looking for a property that does not have the toxic drywall. If you would like to search our local multiple listing service register for a free acct at http://www.leecountyrealtor.listingbook.com

Terry McCarley, Jones & Co Realty
email: leecountyrealtor@earthlink.net
cell: 239-707-4575
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Sep 30, 2011
Hello Maya,
How are things out in God's country---Bend OR? I used to live in the Pacific Northwest myself...Vancouver Canada!
Chinese drywall in a home, regardless of where it is---on or off the canal, is not a good thing. Literally, the drywall is from China and it is defective such that sulphuric odors emit, which erode /corrode all the AC units, copper wiring , tubing etc. throughout the home. It is not yet determined if it will be a health hazard, but some people have little or great reactions to it.
This defective drywall is a result of demand exceeding supply due to excessive abnormal growth in the real estate industry through the years of the early to mid 2000's in this area. That combined with the numerous hurricanes and the destruction that followed resulted in shortages within our own country; and the defective drywall came from elsewhere. At the time, none of these effects were known.
It IS a fact that prior to living in these homes, they must be remediated / rebuilt totally from the inside out --- in other words, take the house down on the inside back to the framing! Costs are approx $25/sq foot, so in the end unless you are contractor, it is NOT worh your while to buy UNLESS its a STEAL! and then you hire a contractor to redo the home.
I hope this answers your questions and helps you out. I'm here if you need help!
Karen
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Sep 30, 2011
Chinese Drywall is defective drywall that emits a sulfur smell and ruins your wiring, air conditioner, pits your bathroom fixtures, turns jewelry black and is basically toxic. Defective drywall must be removed along with everything else in the house including wiring and duct work and the house must be remediated professionally. The house will always have the stigma of being a CD home and it will be difficult to ever resell, remortgage or insure.
I'm surprised everyone in the country isn't aware of this problem. It is common here in FL in homes built during the boom 2003-2007.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Sep 30, 2011
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