Home Selling in Palo Alto>Question Details

Condobuyer, Home Buyer in 94306

What kind of heating is required for home resale?

Asked by Condobuyer, 94306 Fri Dec 13, 2013

Our old built in radiant heater broke in our condo. I cannot find a specialist who can fix it. Right now we just use electrical fan to stay warm, however, I heard there is certain requirement for heating system when I resell the condo. What is it?

Help the community by answering this question:

Answers

21
BEST ANSWER
If your radiant heater was electric it shouldn't be too expensive to put electric baseboard heaters in. If you had a gas fired boiler with circulating hot water, your electric service may not be rated high enough to handle electric heating and would have to be upgraded. Your HOA will have rules regarding the exterior appearance which could limit your choices.

For a buyer to get a loan the property has to be "habitable" which basically means working utilities, a bathroom, kitchen, and heat. A portable heater would probably not be considered adequate by the lender.

Palo Alto home values can be viewed at http://julianalee.com/palo-alto/palo-alto-statistics.htm
Recent Palo Alto home sales can be viewed at
http://julianalee.com/palo-alto/palo-alto-home-sales.htm

If you had a boiler with circulating hot water there are many specialists who repair the radiant heat systems they used. I've never found one who stands out above everyone else but could help you find one.

Juliana Lee
Top 2 agent nationwide at Keller Williams Realty, the nations largest
Cell 650.857.1000
juliana@silicon-valley-homes-for-sale.com

Over 20 years experience
Over 1,000 homes sold in Santa Clara County and San Mateo County
.
Web Reference: http://julianalee.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Fri Dec 13, 2013
I agree with Juliana: baseboard heaters wouldn't be too expensive to put in, and they'd fit the requirement. I had a baseboard heater in my bedroom in my parents house growing up, and it always kept my room warm enough. An electrical service should be able to install them easily. http://www.originaldonnelly.com/heating/
Flag Wed Mar 4, 2015
Thanks for the specifications. I'm not sure about the house I'm looking into buying. I know they have some kind of heating system, but it's all very old. I'd like to replace things, but I don't want to spend too much money. I should just talk to a contractor who can look at the house directly. | http://mitchellplumbing.com
Flag Wed Jan 7, 2015
Thank you for the informative answer. I am in a similar situation, and I will probably have to replace my heater. It may take some time to sell my home, so I will appreciate the warmth in the mean time. It has been several years since I have enjoyed the luxury of a proper heating system.

http://www.eliteairinc.com/services.php?id=92
Flag Mon Nov 17, 2014
PM me for referrals to radiant heat companies.

In terms of heating - a house without a heating system is not fit for human occupancy. The buyers will still be interested but at huge discount. I would strongly recommend to fix the existing system or to replace it with an alternative system.
Web Reference: http://talisrealestate.com
2 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Dec 13, 2013
I think Elena is right about houses without heating systems. They are not fit for human occupancy, but you still might find some buyers. It will probably take some time to get any serious offers. I would recommend replacing the heating system. I think it will pay off in the end.

http://www.mclaughlin-air.com/heating-installation.html
Flag Mon Dec 29, 2014
Exactly-- it's well-worth your money to just replace the heating system. If you try and sell the condo as it is now, you'll have to sell it for a major discount. If the heating system can't be repaired, you could just replace the entire thing. It's up to you, but I'd recommend getting a system in.
| http://www.mercurytecinc.com
Flag Wed Dec 3, 2014
You would be hard pressed to find someone who would live in a place without some sort of heating. It is interesting that a place wouldn't have some sort of heating system, even just a fireplace would work. It would be smart to talk to a heating company and find out the best solution for you.
http://www.homesmartcolorado.com/appliance-repair-services/troubleshooting/heating-repair-denver/
Flag Thu Oct 30, 2014
Condobuyer:

Teri's clients got extraordinarily lucky. Appraisers are supposed to notice such things now. Plug in heater like that are highly unlikely to pass muster nowadays. But if you are the buyer, and want to give that trick a shot, contact Teri or me to submit an offer to the landlord.

Usually, the landlord will fix these things because it makes the condo worth more. Wouldn't you rather buy a home with heat than have to add heat later? If you want me to negotiate this with your landlord as part of the purchase, please give me a call.

Mitchell Pearce
408-639-0211
mitchell@handsonrealtor.com
2 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Dec 13, 2013
Exactly. It might not be a problem now, but it's important to think about resell value. Heating is worth a lot to a buyer. If you want to sell, then you'll have to get it replaced. If your entire system is outdated, then it's worth upgrading in the process. http://www.tasenergysavers.com.au
Flag Fri Mar 6, 2015
Lucky Indeed! TWICE on the same condo.
Flag Fri Dec 13, 2013
Condobuyer:

If there is no central heat of some sort, the home can be bought using an FHA203(k) loan. With an FHA(203)K loan, money is provided within the loan to install heating. Heating to install can be of any type, so long as all living spaces have heat. In order to get financing for a condo outside of an FHA203(k) or similar loan, it must have heat to all living areas. (Loans like FHA203(k) used to be not that hard to come by, but now are quite expensive outside of FHA to the extent they are available at all. Basically, either you have to use an FHA203(k) loan or the landlord has to get the heating in order before completion of sale. That said, the FHA must approve the condo complex before they will consider issuing a loan there. So, in order to know if this is an option for you I'll need to know the address of the Condo. If you reply publicly here, you'll be inundated with solicitations at your doorstep, so I suggest you email me at mitchell@handsonrealtor.com with the condo address or call me at 408-639-0211.

Mitchell Pearce
mitchell@handsonrealtor.com
408-639-0211
2 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Dec 13, 2013
Thank you for sharing the information about FHA203(k) loans. I purchased a condo that does not have a central heating system. I want to install a furnace because that is what I am used to.

http://www.ultrahome.ca
Flag Thu Aug 21, 2014
It is going to depend on the type of financing and how the appraiser looks at the heating. I had a condo where the previous owner removed the base board heaters. The first buyer was FHA and the appraiser didn't notice there was no heater. That buyer installed plug in heaters from Home Depot that looked like base board heaters. When the buyer decided to sell later the appraiser had no issue with the plug in base board heaters. I thought they got lucky.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Fri Dec 13, 2013
There even sell radiant heater in Home Depot and Lowes. You need a permit contact your hoa.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun May 3, 2015
The best thing to do would be to talk to an agent. The ones in your area should know what kind of heating system should be used. When in doubt, you can also call a contractor as well. They should know just as much, if not more, about that kind of thing. http://www.virginiamechanical.com/services/heating.html
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 28, 2015
As long as the heating system is working I don't think it really matters what kind you have. As long as you fully disclose to your buyers everything about the heating system it should be fine. I wouldn't worry too much. http://www.abaileyplumbing.com
Flag Tue May 12, 2015
Your HOA would probably have a few regulations about heating and stuff like that. Each place has their own variations on those rules, so I would look at those bylaws if I were you. It's probably safe to say that something needs to be done to put in heating. http://www.plumbergrandeprairie.ca/furnace_repair.html
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 28, 2015
You do need an actual heating system. People want to know that they'll be able to stay warm when they buy the place. I don't think you necessarily need to do anything specifically though. As long as the repairs you make are enough to provide heating for the place when you sell it, it should do. You might want to ask your condo association if they have a preference on what you do though, just in case they have a rule set up.
http://www.encoremec.com/about
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 21, 2015
I'm pretty sure the "certain requirement" for your heating system would be a requirement to be in a proper working condition. Double check and ask your landlord or property owner. I don't think it would be hard to replace once you find a specialist to fix it. Search on online to find a heating contractor in your area to come look at your system. Ask for a quote that's written as well. It's always good to compare quotes with other companies too. Hope this helps!
http://www.tasenergysavers.com.au/login#!heating/c1jo3
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Mar 31, 2015
In a warm climate, I am not sure if there is a requirement. The home just needs to be fit for human occupation. That being said, you definitely want to get the heater fixed before you sell. It will be well worth the investment because you severely restrict the pool of potential buyers if you don't.

http://www.tholiver.com/heating.html
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Mar 26, 2015
There may not be any requirement of heating in a home resale. Most of the population today would prefer having a heating unit in the home already. If there is not already a system set up in your home you may want to look into installing one either way. http://www.ajph.com/hvac.html
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Mar 17, 2015
If you want to find a good buyer, or if you want to be able to sell your condo for a higher value I would recommend getting your heating fixed or replaced. No one wants to buy a condo that will be freezing in the winter. There are several new systems you can have put in that will add value and comfort to your condo. http://good-inc.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Jan 2, 2015
consider a replacement. Your model is most likely a dated inefficient type.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Dec 11, 2014
Do you live in a condo association? If so they will have guidelines for what you need to install. If not though you should be fine to install whatever you want. Central heating and air is the way to go these days. Ducting a house can be pricey though! http://www.biggerstaffs.com/heating-cooling
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Dec 5, 2014
Hi,

I would think the HOA may have some recommendations on what the other units may have done in similar situations.

All the best,

Arpad
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 18, 2014
I really want to be able to sell my home for a good price. I might have to put in a new heating system. The old one hasn't been running very well. We are going to freeze this winter. How much do they cost to fix? http://www.wkmechanical.com/services/heating.php
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 18, 2014
I've lived in much worse conditions for much longer. If there's a standard for resale, then I'm sure it's nothing more than a formality. People tend to deal with crazy circumstances for much longer than they have to. I once lived on nothing but a single heating fan in the coldest time of winter. We had to keep the bedroom door shut to conserve the warmth.
http://www.oilheatserviceandsupply.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Nov 14, 2014
As far as I've learned, you don't need a specific type of heating system. However, I do think that it would be wise to get a new heating system instead of trying to repair it. I would check with your condo association and make sure that they don't have any requirements. If they do, then you might want to make sure that you get it figured out before you sell your home! http://www.geraldsairheat.com/Heating-Services-Virginia-Beac…
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Oct 22, 2014
The market is so hot in Palo Alto right now with Palo Alto schools, I recommend you do everything you can to have things operational at a basic level so the conversation the buyers have (when they read the disclosures) is not focused on the heating. It's too basic.

You want the conversations to be "I love it" "When can we move in" "I like the lighting" "It's really open" "I like the floor plan."

I recommend you keep researching heating systems and bite the bullet to repair to something that then becomes invisible so the focus is on "multiple offers." I would guess (but could never guarantee of course) that the price of having an operational heating system would come back to you in a home sale with an operational house vs. the doubt a non-heated home would cause (what else didn't the seller maintain? what else could be broken? how could they live without a heater?!).

The time to get into Palo Alto schools is now through June but people already may not get into the "school that your home feeds into."

So if you are still focused on selling I recommend you get a good and thorough inspection; disclose everything fixed and not fixed; and get the heater out of the conversation that the buyer needs to have and the lender needs to consider when the offer is placed.

Erica

Erica Glessing
Attended elementary, middle and high school in Palo Alto!
Luxury Homes and Gardens
reeBroker
DRE 01425475
408-416-7090
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Apr 5, 2014
The market is so hot in Palo Alto right now with Palo Alto schools, I recommend you do everything you can to have things operational at a basic level so the conversation the buyers have (when they read the disclosures) is not focused on the heating. It's too basic.

You want the conversations to be "I love it" "When can we move in" "I like the lighting" "It's really open" "I like the floor plan."

I recommend you keep researching heating systems and bite the bullet to repair to something that then becomes invisible so the focus is on "multiple offers." I would guess (but could never guarantee of course) that the price of having an operational heating system would come back to you in a home sale with an operational house vs. the doubt a non-heated home would cause (what else didn't the seller maintain? what else could be broken? how could they live without a heater?!).

The time to get into Palo Alto schools is now through June but people already may not get into the "school that your home feeds into."

So if you are still focused on selling I recommend you get a good and thorough inspection; disclose everything fixed and not fixed; and get the heater out of the conversation that the buyer needs to have and the lender needs to consider when the offer is placed.

Erica

Erica Glessing
Attended elementary, middle and high school in Palo Alto!
Luxury Homes and Gardens
reeBroker
DRE 01425475
408-416-7090
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Apr 5, 2014
Search Advice
Ask our community a question
Email me when…

Learn more

Copyright © 2015 Trulia, Inc. All rights reserved.   |  
Have a question? Visit our Help Center to find the answer