Question Details

William, Home Seller in 18951

To Brochure Box ... Or Not To Brochure Box

Asked by William, 18951 Mon Nov 26, 2007

What's your opinion on a brochure box?

Our realtor prefers to *not* have a brochure box. They say if someone is interested enough in the home, they'll call the number. And my realtor feels that if they have the opportunity to speak to the buyer in person, they feel tehir ability to show their excitement for the home in person will get us a better chance at a showing than just a brochure. I do agree that they would be great at selling the home if they get a chance to talk to a potential buyer!

But ... I also remember when I was looking at homes that I was unlikely to call the number on the signs - I preferred being able to pick up a brochure at the curb and get the information rather than deal with the realtor bringing me in as a client.

We had a brochure box as a FSBO. Lots of brochures were taken, not sure how many yielded interest or a showing. But it seemed to be a no-brainer ... interested in some other viewpoints!

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Answers

91
I put full color brochure with pictures, supplement, mls listing sheet, personal information, and ability to load brochure on your pda via a text message. People love it. You need to do as much as you can. Everything works, nothing doesn't work. You just never know. I have gotten listings a year later and people have saved my brochure for that long--because they loved it.
Web Reference: http://www.myhomesguide.com
7 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 28, 2007
Hi William,

My view is that the brochure box and anything else that can be used to get as many eyes n the property as possible should be used. This is one of many tools used in my presentation kit.

The brochure can be taken at any time of day or night.

I would compare any piece of reading material that is taken by choice and not mailed to the readership of a magazine is not measured by the subscriber count. Readership is measured by the estimated number of readers. That is, how many people actually pick up that individual copy and read it or how many people it is passed on to.

I’ve had people at my open houses that ask me if they can take a brochure to mail to a relative or friend that is looking to buy in a specific area. A brochure is the best tool to do so.

Like you many buyers out there hesitate to call an agent until they feel they need to. It’s just like when we go shopping for a pair of shoes. The clerk will ask if they can help us and we say no, when what we really mean is not yet. So I would let them shop.

Some agents prefer to get the calls so they can try to convert the buyer into a client whether it’s to buy your home or another.

Hope that helps,

George Antonopoulos
Coldwell Banker
ShorelineRE.com
800.759.6936
6 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
Wow - 19 answers to that question. With all the thumb action, there was only one TU for the question that sparked all this discussion. (I just gave a 2nd TU.) You guys are tough.
As a buyer and seller, this is my take - not that it is right - but to give you a client reaction:
1) I like brochure boxes. I will take a flyer home. If it sparks my interest, I will use it to go to the agents web site and look further. I personally do not like to do business on the phone so this is the best avenue to reach me.
2) Your best shot with me is to get me on the web, not the phone. I will generally inquire by email. If you jam me on the phone, it is probably our only contact. If you have a killer web site, I will save this and come back. A killer web site has complete information on properties with tons of photos. It has great info, like a search by neighborhood feature, with NO requirement to fill in your personal info to access. Even if I am just looking right now, if you give me thorough info, you are the agent I am most likely to call when I am ready to get serious.
3) My general reaction to no price is that it is priced too high, and that is why they don't want to tell you. I usually go no further with the property. I will sometimes look it up on the web, and if I did have an interest, I would probably go thru another agent. I don't want to deal with a realtor that I feel is less than forthcoming with me. (I am not saying that this is correct. I am sharing what kind of reaction no price info generates in some people.)
4.) All over my neighborhood, there are empty brochure boxes. I know these realtors, and I know they have not been out here in weeks. I have seen their empty brochure boxes all over town. It is the same realtors, year after year, with the empty boxes. The empty box next to their name is an arrow pointing to their name that says "I do nothing after I get your listing."
5.) I think brochures are very useful for land. Most buyers don't know how to look at land and don't want to walk in the woods or brush. I also think a great brochure will make a low price home look more upscale. I think it is critical for a mid-priced home which is the glut in the inventory for my town. They are less common on high end homes.
We are moving into an age of more perfect information, and the ability to "hook" a buyer by phone is decreasing. Whoever has the best information wins.
OK - just MHO. Thumb away, you meanies out there!!!
5 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2007
Hi William,
Our opinion is that it is to your benefit to have brochures available. With a brochure, an interested party
can see the inside of your house and the backyard, which is more than they can see from the street. They can also find out whether or not the home is in their price range. I've had a Realtor tell me that they never put the price on the brochure, because they get people to call them that way. It is a way for an agent to try to get more buyers, but not neccesarily for your home. I've also had potential buyers tell me adamantly that they would never, NEVER work with an agent who didn't put the price on the brochure, or have a brochure box. Many of them recognize it as a tactic to benefit the agent, not the seller.
5 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
Brochuer Box; a must have for me and my clients.

Although it also depends on the quality of the flyers your realtor produces. It's an art form. Great pictures, wonderful descriptions, website addresses; the whole thing. Although the opposite may hurt, but that's the same with internet presence.

I have people take my flyers and show them to their friends just in case they want to buy.

If they see what they like, they will call. Sometimes they will take one and go to open houses. Of course, it has to be priced right also.

Gonna go, but that's my vote.

Sylvia
5 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
Sylvia Barry,…, Real Estate Pro in Marin, CA
MVP'08
Contact
Hi William, I will probably get alot of TD's for this, but I don't agree with Brochure Boxes in all cases. My feeling is that giving too much information is detrimental to the sale of the property. Often times, a buyer will pick up the brochure out of the box and see something that they don't like. They will never call to see the property. However, if they call to view the property, there is opportunity that something else that they may LOVE about the property may help them to overcome that which they did not like. This opportunity only arises out of the viewing of the property and if a brochure may hinder their entry into the property, I say don't use it. Buyers like to talk through their objections and weigh the pros and cons. Give them the opportunity to do that! All the best to you, Cynthia
4 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 28, 2007
O.k. last time on this thread. I think the overall gist of the responses is to make sure your Realtor/Licensee has a full marketing plan which is IMPLEMENTED during the time of your listing. Brochure Box is one of many, many items on my marketing plan as is "enter into MLS". Those lamenting the use of brochure boxes are sending all the data to Realtor.com or posting Virtual Tours showing the entire house! This is all about drivign leads to the Realtor/Licensee which I absolutely agree is one of the reasons we have SIGNS!! But companies handle signs differently. Some very controlling companies who wish all leads to come through their call centers frown on signs driving those leads to the Agent. Other companies allow agent "name riders" while still others belive the business is all about the Agent! A brochure box counters some of the more controlling companies (you know who you are!). Alright, I'm off topic and onto another thread!
4 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2007
This may not be a popular answer to agents who like to use brochures and not put the price on them. If there is no price....mind you I am an agent looking to buy in another area outside of my mls.....I don't even want the brochure and I will not call the agent. I don't know why that bothers me, it has changed the way I handle my own brochures. I used to think about leaving off the price to generate calls.... now I don't.
4 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2007
As an active buyer, I like the brochure box because the flyer has the home price, size, and photos on it.
This way we can see if
1. the home is in our price range
2. what it looks like
3. how big it is

If it meets our criteria, we can call the broker to see if they will meet us then and there to see it. Otherwise, we can move on and not waste anyones time.
4 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
I agree with the realtor and agree with your perspective as well, but I lean toward the realtor's perspective more. However, since you are the customer, its your choice.

Personally, I generally don't use brochure boxes and feel that it's specific to the home. For example, I currently have a listing that cannot be viewed from street level as it is surrounded by the grounds so I agreed without hesitation to a brochure box.
4 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
Congrats JR on selling your listings. Yes, I have also seen several multi offers in a sluggish market. Fence sitters assume the property will be waiting for them while they re-think it. Once a buyer steps up, some of the fence sitters join in. In other intances, it was totally coincidental that 2 offers came in on the same day. Yes, there are buyers out there. Properteis must be priced right and marketed well.

On the subject of Brochure Boxes and Prices. The biggest reason I have for not putting a price on a flyer in a brochure box is price change. I see complaints from consumers here about incorrect pricing on Trulia, or seeing the same property w. different price points.

I am not trying to withhold the price so the buyer will call me to find out the price.

I am concerned about price changes and accurate represention.

Example: Realtor advises seller to lower price at least 30K. Hubby does not want to lower price. Wife coaxes hubby to lower price at least 15K. Reatlor delivers new brochures to the property for both inside the house and the brochure box. . Realtor goes in and changes price on 35 web sites, showing reduction of 15K. Price change made. 4 days later, wife convinced hubby to listed to the Realtor advice and the sellers lower the price 30K. Realtor goes in to website and changes the price again, now reflecting the 30K price drop.

Reatlor cks a few websites and sees that the same property is appearing 3x at 3 different prices on one website, and 1x at the orignal price on another website, and 1x on another website at the mid range price. Realtor has submitted all info timely and accurately. The systems and data input now just need catch up.

Buyer drives by and picks up a flyer from the outdoor brochure box which reflects the mid-range price point. Buyer goes to a website for more information and finds the property listed at the original price point, and buyer calls the lisitng office for clarification. On the phone, the buyer finds out that neither price is correct and is agitated with the listing brokerage for sloppy representation. Worse, the buyer thinks the Realtor was deceitful.

I withhold pricing on outdoor brochures in boxes for reasons of accuracy, not out of desire to entrap a buyer.
3 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 28, 2007
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Brick, NJ
MVP'08
Contact
Everyone of my listings has a flyer box.

Buyers don't call to gather information. They expect a flyer. If there isn't one, then they don't call. How do I know? Because I have asked. For years when I would meet with a seller I would ask "When you were shopping for a home and came across a house for sale without a flyer box, did you call the number on the sign?" Only a handful ever did. I used this to demonstrate to the seller the importance of professional color flyers.

From the agent side, there are two reasons that agents don't do flyers.
1. They are lazy. Flyer boxes run out and need to be restocked.
2. They are out of touch with buyers and the buying process.

I sell over 50 homes a year and every one of them has a flyer box and is stocked with flyers.
Web Reference: http://www.TrummTeam.com
3 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2007
I always put my website address and the proeprty website on the flyer.

My take is that in this market, the more we do for our clients the better. The key is the quality, just like anything else we do - gonna show case the house. A few good pictures will definitely entice people to come back and see the inside of the house.

Don't worry, Ginger, I got two TDs for voting for Brochure box.

Sylvia
3 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2007
Sylvia Barry,…, Real Estate Pro in Marin, CA
MVP'08
Contact
Ginger, I am sure you are not the only buyer that prefers to work through the web. We have all stated at one time or another that buyers find their dream home on the web before they contact an agent, or at least start their search there. Maybe we could look at the box in a more positive light and put our web info on it. "To see more pictures and details visit http://www.######. You get the idea. You have inspired me!!
3 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2007
William, I like to use brochure boxes for any number of reasons. First, if we have gone through 50 flyers in the course of a couple of weeks I ask the buyer, "think it's time for a price reduction?" Kinda natural don't you think?
As a Realtor I like brochure boxes to see what the price or informatin is on a property when I'm diving around. Even with my techy e-key which has every listing on my Treo, I still like to grab a flyer! It's a baby boomer thing!
I like to "cross-market" my services. I once met a great Seller/Buyer from the additional marketing material I ADD to the usual property brochure. I'll put a brief bio on myself, tips on buying/selling, web site information--whatever I can stuff into those little bitty things! This particular Seller/Buyer was looking for someone who thought outside of the brochure "box"!!
Most Realtors pass through their listings onto Realtor.com with a full address so what's the biggie? Put on a flyer of all your other listings, your web sites, bio,Open House dates, etc. Make it work for you. And PULEASE--don't have an empty box! Arrrrgh (ooops! getting hosile and mean spirited here! I'm watching my P's and Q's in this regard!)

Francesca--Don't take the Thumbs Down to personally!! Maybe if you had brochure boxes cross marketing your talents you would have sold 20 Million in the last two years!!
3 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
Ginger R.....I hope you don't mind but your answer to this question was PERFECT and you are not even a Realtor. Every single word you said were my exact feelings. So..............instead of writing my own response I just copied and pasted your words into my Answer.....I hope you don't mind, it's just that I couldn't have said it better myself and I just tried to in another question. I really hope more Realtors "catch on" to how the modern buyers think.......it'll be better for everyone. Thanks again for a GREAT answer...here it is again....

================================================================================

Wow - 19 answers to that question. With all the thumb action, there was only one TU for the question that sparked all this discussion. (I just gave a 2nd TU.) You guys are tough.
As a buyer and seller, this is my take - not that it is right - but to give you a client reaction:
1) I like brochure boxes. I will take a flyer home. If it sparks my interest, I will use it to go to the agents web site and look further. I personally do not like to do business on the phone so this is the best avenue to reach me.
2) Your best shot with me is to get me on the web, not the phone. I will generally inquire by email. If you jam me on the phone, it is probably our only contact. If you have a killer web site, I will save this and come back. A killer web site has complete information on properties with tons of photos. It has great info, like a search by neighborhood feature, with NO requirement to fill in your personal info to access. Even if I am just looking right now, if you give me thorough info, you are the agent I am most likely to call when I am ready to get serious.
3) My general reaction to no price is that it is priced too high, and that is why they don't want to tell you. I usually go no further with the property. I will sometimes look it up on the web, and if I did have an interest, I would probably go thru another agent. I don't want to deal with a realtor that I feel is less than forthcoming with me. (I am not saying that this is correct. I am sharing what kind of reaction no price info generates in some people.)
4.) All over my neighborhood, there are empty brochure boxes. I know these realtors, and I know they have not been out here in weeks. I have seen their empty brochure boxes all over town. It is the same realtors, year after year, with the empty boxes. The empty box next to their name is an arrow pointing to their name that says "I do nothing after I get your listing."
5.) I think brochures are very useful for land. Most buyers don't know how to look at land and don't want to walk in the woods or brush. I also think a great brochure will make a low price home look more upscale. I think it is critical for a mid-priced home which is the glut in the inventory for my town. They are less common on high end homes.
We are moving into an age of more perfect information, and the ability to "hook" a buyer by phone is decreasing. Whoever has the best information wins.
OK - just MHO. Thumb away, you meanies out there!!!
2 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Apr 5, 2008
You all are making valid points and I agree with most! However, my answer regarding price on the flyer is more directed towards the realtors as opposed to the FSBO's. If you are running your business like a business you should be using your listings to help you get more buyers and we have been successful in this "buyers market" at getting the leads through folks calling about the home off of the flyers. Of course the 800 number is on the sign and the "just listed" postcards as well. Deborah, you make a great point about missing information etc upon a price change, however if realtors and their team have systems in place that do not let them forget to make these changes then you are fine and these problems do not happen.

I think all too often Realtors are not spending money on things like Top Producer / Wise Agent etc that provide the infrastructure to keep this from happening.

By the way, while I disagree on this issue with the Wagner iTeam, they are a great model for realtors to follow as I am impressed with their online presence and the quality of information on their sites.

JR is correct that it is a major sin to waste that money on color flyers that are tossed!
2 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 28, 2007
You make a good point about price, Deborah. Plus, it's sinful to me to throw away 50 color flyers because the price changes, LOL! ;)
2 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 28, 2007
Of course you should place a brochure box at the property if placement is feasible and within any local or association rules and regulations. Will it sell the house? Maybe not. Will it prevent the sale of the house? Absolutely not. Given current market conditions it is critical to be aggressive and proactive and "user friendly." I agree with you that this is a "no brainer." Other things for you to consider are other areas where your realtor is being proactive such as online marketing that include Trulia, craigslist, oodle, backpage, and an address specific website for your home. Again, these steps respond to the currently sluggish housing market and reach out to as many buyers as possible.

Best of luck selling your home.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 28, 2007
Why put the Price on the Flyer? Not putting it will encourage them to call you.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2007
I believe that it is at an agent's and seller's discretion to decide if they want a brochure box or not. I agree with lots of comments below and I understand that you cannot put everyhting down about a house on a sheet of paper. After all, we are not trying to sell a "house", we are trying to sell a "home" and you cannot convey that through paper. You want to generate traffic to get inside the house and the first thing is to get them to go to the website and look at some photos.

However it is a buyer's market and therefore we have to listen to buyers and they are saying give me information that is going to make me want to call you to show me the house.

However, the point is to sell the house you were hired by the seller not to get buyers to call you and use that sign and brochure as a lead generation to sell them something else.

I feel that I come across as a bad agent if my sign stays on a property a long time. I always prepare my sellers that the first 20 or so brochures are going to be taken by the neighbors... it's the activity after that you must watch. Basic information is all that is needed on a flyer... such as beds/baths/SF and PRICE and a website to look at pictures and more...

A name rider with a website is just not enough, buyers need something on paper to take with them so they can refer to later.

I long for the days when the topic of multiple offers comes back!!!! Do we even remember how to deal with that?

Thumbs away!!!
2 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2007
Here is another reason why photos are important on the flyer. In my neighborhood, most of the homes were built 30-50 years ago so you can imagine what the interiors of some of these homes look like.

My husband and I are specifically looking for a refurbished home requiring little work, particularly a new kitchen with granite counters and a spa like master bath. You can easily see from the photos if the house is a fixer or remodeled (especially the kitchen) from the photos.

Again...another time saver for everyone if the photos accurately depict the homes interior.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2007
Michael (and everyone) - pls don't stop posting if you have other thoughts on this, some really great opinions here. Thanks again for all the viewpoints!

In the end, as the seller, I need to make a decision on whether I think the brochure box will benefit me (i.e. increase the chance that my home will sell faster with the box vs without the box.) I need to be convinced that the decision to have/not have a brochure box is rooted solely on this outcome.

It's very interesting to see all the realtor issues and angles with the brochure boxes, and reasons outside of the interest of the seller that realtors might consider (i.e. box is inconvenient to maintain, calls can generate more clients for realtor, brokerages want calls coming through their call centers.) The non-realtor-business-centric viewpoints are also compelling. What to do?

Hmmm JR - why not post the home price right on the house? I bet in this market, alot of neighbors would be suprised at how low the homes are selling for and might try to talk a friend into moving into the neighborhood! Alot cheaper than a mailing. Does making a potential buyer call for a price benefit the realtor or the sale of the home more? Every new home development in my area posts home prices right on the sign ... and they're some of our most active competition! If a buyer can't afford my home, why do I care if they call you or not? Of course, there is a great upside for the realtor to get that call and a chance at showing them other homes in their price range....

Ha, who woulda thought there would be so much passion over a little plastic box :)
2 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2007
I don't like boxes. They are a lot of trouble and I don't believe they give a return. IMO the people who take flyers are curious passersby who want to know the price. And no, I don't put a price on, there should be SOME reason to call. Why not just put a ticket on the house that says "$485,000!!!!". The flyers get damp and look terrible, and nothing is worse than an empty box. Worst yet, I once put a flyer box at a neighbor's listing and she would call me to complain the box was empty. I left a stack of flyers at her house and explained to her that if they got wet she could replace them if I didn't get over there quickly enough but apparantly she wasn't going to fill the box. Personally, if I were a homeowner who thought a box was important, I would keep a pile and fill the box if it got empty. JMO.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2007
Thanks for all the responses guys - this is the type of information and debate that is so helpful to sellers like me!

Ha - when we were FSBO, I caught an agent emptying my brochure box (driving away, recognized the car from a neighbors house), and I know it happened on at least 2 other occassions (put 10 brochures out, half hour later they're all gone. We're not on a busy road!)

( We also caught an agent stealing our "Home For Sale" directional sign from the street corner - red handed. That time we tracked them down and got our $10 sign back. Wow - Real Estate is a competative business! Boy were we mad! )

For my realtor, I can't figure out why they wouldn't want brochures out there. They created an absolutely gorgeous full-color fold-over brochure... and the stack of them aren't selling my house from my kitchen drawer! But I can understand Francesca and Lorie's points also. We're thinking about giving it another week - if showings don't pick up we'll probably ask for a box....
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
To those naysayers who've marked my response thumbs down . . . I've sold over $10M in properties in the past two years WITHOUT ANY BOXEX!
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
William,
Great question, I always use brochure boxes and I actually put brochures in them. However I often wonder if I'm missing out on the sign calls by giving the buyer so much information without having to talk to me. I would let your Realtor work his or her plan and relax, if someone is interested they'll call or look it up on the internet.
Michael Doyle
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2007
From my perspective, a brochure box is "another iron in the fire". All you need to make a sale is one solid lead from any source. Without flyers that are easily accessible from the road, some prospects may be lost. (Not everyone has a pen or piece of paper handy to write down the agent's contact information or the address of the house.)
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Mar 16, 2011
Brochure Boxes Can Be Great Advertising Vehicles. However, Only If They Are Kept Full! It Amazes Me That Over 55% Of All Flyer Boxes In Central Florida Are Always Empty. We Refill Flyer Boxes For Realtors In The Orlando And Daytona Beach Areas.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sat Apr 18, 2009
I absolutely believe that brochure or flier boxes should be used and be well-stocked. I know that a lot of agents feel like yours but I'm wondering just how many calls they are getting, especially in this slow real estate market. My husband and I were just discussing how frustrating it is when the boxes are empty. We aren't looking for ourselves but we have friends moving into the neighborhood and want to canvas it for them. We need a flier to know if the home is even in their range, style, size, etc... Pictures are highly desirable. We found AND purchased our last home based on a flier and we weren't even LOOKING for a new home. We just saw the brochure and fell in love with it!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sat Jan 31, 2009
As a buyer, I will not write down the address, I will not call the number on the sign. I want a flyer with the price and basic info on it. A website address with "more info and pictures on the website" is great.
I think many agents don't use brochure boxes hoping to make their phone ring so they can try to sell me any house, not necessarily the one I am calling about. It is a disservice to the seller to not have a box, and even more importantly; not keeping it full.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sat Jan 31, 2009
I'm not calling without one.
If you have a sign, get a box. More important, keep the box full. Putting the sign in your yard is just advertising for the realtor company. You want to advertise for your house.
I think the fact that most of the flyer boxes in my neighborhood are empty point to a bigger trend. Realtors don't care anymore. Lazy, unprofessional, and not getting my business. The current market trend is that you are expected to go get a buyers agent and have them find the house for you. They want me to call, and they want to be my buyers agent.... You want your house sold. Get some flyers.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Thu Aug 14, 2008
Hello,

In answer to your question, I say that regardless of whether your Realtor prefers to not have a box, you are the client and it is your dollars that are paying the commission. I believe that we have a duty to give our best advice to our clients and give them the straight facts but if you feel that a box with flyers is a better idea, then tell your Realtor to get to it! It only takes about half an hour to do a good flyer since we are almost all tech savy and the printing shouldn't cost that much or be free if it is done at their office. Besides, flyers do give you an idea of how your home is doing and what kind of marketing exposure it is getting. Try putting little numbers on the back of the flyers to count how many are being taken every day. If none are gone, you are either not getting enough market exposure or your price could be too high!

Okay, there is my two cents worth! Good Luck!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Thu Aug 14, 2008
Seems like a no-brainer to me as well. If the brochure turns the person off, most likely they weren't going to buy your home in the first place.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Thu Aug 7, 2008
If I put out a brochure box, I put limited information....no price. Its a teaser...I want them to call.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jun 22, 2008
I am a realtor in Fredericksburg, TX and have recently encountered very much the same predicament. When the brochure box is up, there are fewer calls from "drive-by's". Typically these "drive-by" buyers are just starting to think about buying. They haven't gotten serious and gotten a realtor yet. On homes that I have listed without the box, the calls do lead about 1/4 of the time to showings. My home owner appreciated the box because it reduced showings to those who were really serious about the house. She felt lookers got the brochure and then after getting more information about the home where able to decide if the home was really right for them.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sat Jun 21, 2008
I have always used brochure boxes for my flyers. I use inside photos to interest them in wanting to view the inside of the house for themselves and this allows me to meet them speak with them in person. I do however leave off the price so they will call me directly, and this gives me the opportunity to ask them questions and get a feel for what they are looking for. Ultimately the decision is made by the seller.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Fri May 9, 2008
This has always caused a big debate. I think it is better to have a brochure with lots of pictures to make the potential buyer want to see inside.
Web Reference: http://JohnTaylorSells.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Apr 23, 2008
I definitely would put a flyer box on every property listing all the details of the property and plenty of pictures. What you might want to leave out is the price. That way when the buyer has seen the property and actually gotten some interest in it he will call for a price and then you will be able to actually capture your buyer's attention with your own enthusiam and hopefully arrange an appointment for a showing.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Apr 23, 2008
I find that the brochure boxes are normally raided by the neighbors. I use Talking House and DOT COM the home address. Everyone's on the web, it saves paper, and can give a ton more information as well as being able to be forwarded. It helps brand "you" better as well as showing you have the technology on your side that most agents really need to catch up on!
Web Reference: http://www.5710Emory.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Apr 23, 2008
I think this goes along with agents who don't list prices on flyers. The theory is that it will make people call to get more information. My take is that it intimidates people. I am all for a flyer box, as long as you are going to keep it filled!) and a price on the flyer.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Apr 23, 2008
One of the problems with a brochure box is inability to follow up with potential customers. When someone takes a brochure, I can't contact them about Open Houses, answer questions about the home, help them establish value or any of the many things we do to sell you home. We need a way to communicate face to face or phone to phone to accomplish that. I use an information hotline on my signs (instead of a flyer box.) It provides my recorded narrative about the home, will connect directly to me if the customer wants more information and captures a telephone number for future follow-up. The recording tells the customer they may receive a follow up call and leads them through the process depending on their needs. I've had very good responses from customers using the "hotline." It really helps when we are having an Open House or in the case of a price reduction. It allows me to return to people who previously stopped by the home and re-introduce the possibilities. It's one of many tools in my tool box!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Apr 23, 2008
I prefer not to use a brochure box. It seems that they are always empty the day after I fill them and yet I don't receive any calls. My sign has my cell phone number and my web site on it. I have also found that an 800 number is a good way to get buyers to call. They can listen to a recorded message and not feel uneasy about talking to an agent.
Web Reference: http://www.mikesnearly.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 22, 2008
I believe in brochure boxes. A beautifully created bruchure, filled with the correct wording and pictures will a entice a buyer to want to come in and experience the feelings described in the brochure.

As a consumer I want as much info as possible before I make the decision to bother my Realtor and the seller with a showing. I'm annoyed by what I perceive to be "sales strategies " to make me call, so they can capture my number and try to sell me something else.

As a Realtor I don't want to waste my sellers time cleaning and making plans to remove themselves, their children and pets, so someone that drove by and liked the exterior, can come in only to find out it has everything they don't want and would never buy this home. I also know that by making the buyer call me to get the info on the home, I can then attempt to sell the buyer something else, if this home doesn't meet their needs, in essence using this tactict as a way to pick up new buyers.

I believe today's buyers are saavy and the days of Realtors being the holder of all information are long gone. Where I live, brochure boxes are standard practice and as long as they remain filled (big pet peeve, empty boxes) they benefit both the seller and the buyer, but not necessarily the Realtor. Just my opinion...
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 22, 2008
What a great question!

Personally......there are too many reasons not to implement a "Box." From the curb, a buyer can see everything they need to to make a decision to consider a home further. The agent/office telephone numbers should provide direct access to the best source of information.

The "Eckler Team"
ecklerteam@comcast.net
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Apr 6, 2008
William,

Using a brochure box is an excellent way to advertise your home.

Just a couple of tips:

1) keep a few but not many brochures in the box at all times (if your realtor provides the box, ask your realtor to give you additional brochures so you do not run out)

2) dont give too much information on the brochure. You want the prospective buyer to call and hopefully to set the appointment to see your house.
For example: if you say 2000 sq ft, the buyer may think, that is too small for me and not give your home another thought. But if that same buyer was curious about the size of your home, they may call to find out (in this example) the size, and after talking to you or your agent, may decide to see you home anyway to determine in person if your home would work for them.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Fri Nov 30, 2007
Hello William. As a potential buyer there are several things that I look for when I'm looking for property. One, is how cagy is the agent? By that I mean, is the agent willing to risk giving me accurate information about a property listing prior to my making a decision to work with that realty person, or, does the agent require that I (a) call them for price or location before getting the vital information I need? Cagy agents count their kudos by the number of calls they get, and see a direct relationship between calls and sales. While there is some statistical validity to this statement if one was selling chocolate bars, soap, cosmetic or cleaning products, it does not follow that this rule applies to real estate. For myself, I would rather make all possible information available to potential customers. If after looking at the facts and assuming that they are intelligent adults, I would expect them to call if the brochure is sufficiently informative, is appealing, and the agent is not playing sales games. All things being equal in the brochure box, the most effective brochure, not necessarily the cutest one, will get the call and at the same time, save the agent hours and hours of answering questions on the phone that could have been just as well answered through a brochure, complete with pricing. Imagine all that an agent can do with productive time not spent answering general questions on the phone?
Web Reference: http://www.taxcats.net
1 vote Thank Flag Link Fri Nov 30, 2007
RE: Putting price on a flyer:
I do not belive that flyers sell a house at all. I put them out at a Sellers request (under certain circumstances) but the flyers are created for the people who take them. People who pull flyers want the price and (from my experience) are angry if the price is not on the flyer. If the home is interesting enough - they will call: price or no price.
Web Reference: http://www.wagneriteam.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 28, 2007
Naima wrote:
I long for the days when the topic of multiple offers comes back!!!! Do we even remember how to deal with that?
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I was lucky enough to have multiple offers on two of my listings in the past month. Both are in contract. Coincidentally, both were priced right. I had 3 offers the same weekend for one. The next week we got two more after we had an agreed price.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 28, 2007
Collier wrote:
Why put the Price on the Flyer? Not putting it will encourage them to call you.
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I noticed you got thumbs down for this one. You make a good point. Does anyone deny that most people who call on a sign are surprised to find out how high the price is? The reason they stop to pick up a flyer is because they are curious about the price. More than likelythey are going to be surprised at how high it is. I think that most people who pick up flyers do it out of curiousity. Why do I stop and pick up FSBO flyers? BEcause I think I might want to buy the house? Not likely. I'm wondering what the price is. Anyone truly interested in the house is not going to say "well I'M not calling! What NERVE! They didn't put the PRICE on the FLYER!". :)
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 28, 2007
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