Question Details

Rep Chandler, Real Estate Pro in Oklahoma City, OK

Should my realtor take less commission to make a deal work?

Asked by Rep Chandler, Oklahoma City, OK Sun Oct 10, 2010

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Answers

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This comes up just about every time the buyer and the seller get close to their absolute bottom (or top) line. Usually a deal can be reached, it just may take some more creative, or skillful negotiation by one or both of the agents involvced in the transaction. It's not fair to ask an agent to cut the fee that they have worked hard for and earned (as many have said). However, if there really is ABSOLUTELY NO OTHER WAY, the agent has a choice to whether or not he or she is willing to take a cut in pay to get the deal done. He or She may decide its worth it to be done and move on, but I don't think the agent is obligated.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Oct 13, 2010
I think you should ask yourself, when I do my job, quote a price, and do the work, would I appreciate or have respect for my customer if they asked me to do it for less, after the fact? I'm sure not.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Oct 13, 2010
When asked the question should a REALTOR take less to make a deal work. Does your lawyer take less, does the dentist take less, the accountant, the doctor, your house keeper, the restaurant owner. Whatever commission is made at the time of the listing is the agreement between the listing agent and the seller or buyer, whichever they are working for, is what is due the REALTOR. Come to think of it my hairdresser never cuts me a deal and I go often, nor does the nail guy. I am very fair with my commissions, and if the seller or buyer wants to pay less, they need another REALTOR. It also depends on how much work the REALTOR does, I see million dollar listing with 3 or 4 photos, then a commission should be cut, unless it is the seller choice. You shoul get what you pay for, and that should be in writing.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 12, 2010
Hi Rep Chandler,
Every situation is different & commissions are negotiable so it doesn't hurt to ask. However most fees are negotiated before you list the property not after the realtor markets your property & finds a buyer for your home. If the price is not what you exoect tell the agent to go back to the buyers & tell them they have to come up in price if they really want the house. If it is not meant to be, then wait for a better offer.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 12, 2010
Thanks for the thumbs up good luck with your transaction.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 12, 2010
Why would you want them to do this?
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 12, 2010
@Mack. I didn't know that ..... I thought all states were moving towards transaction brokerage. Interesting. So transaction brokers are the future? Or the other way around?
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Oct 11, 2010
Realtors should be paid for their work....
If there is any negotiation, you a the contractor have potentially more to offer than the Realtor, and because of their brokerage association they may not be able to and they should not have to work for nothing. You on the
other hand to make a deal work can offer upgrades and other items to the buyers....

So I am not sure why you expect the Realtor to jump in....???
Good Luck!
It is also a question of value of property and the % of agreed upon commission....
Edith YourChicagoConnection
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Oct 11, 2010
Scott, here in Washington State, by default, the listing broker represents the Seller, and the selling broker represents the Buyer.

My feeling, Rep, is that if you don't want to make the deal work, then it's not your Realtor(r)'s place to fill in on your behalf.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Oct 11, 2010
@Mack. How does that work in Florida? Down here the law for Transaction Brokers (all default contracts) is that you represent the transaction.

No comprende'.

Thanks, Scott.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Oct 11, 2010
I think most realtors work very hard for their money. Listing agents usually have to pay for advertising, and buyer agents often do a lot of running around to show houses that don't always end in a sale. We all have business expenses just like any other business, fees, health insurance, car payments and insurance and all kinds of advertising and promotion expenses! I like to think that as an agent, I have the ability to thank a client by contributing something in the way of home warranties, or pest inspections, or gifts, but this economy has not only hurt homeowner, but realtors as well, being a commission based business. Best, Terry Bell, Realtor, Santa Rosa, CA
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Oct 10, 2010
I think that's a fair question. Some Realtors will take less. Depends on the bottom line. Any Realtor that would not consider this option would not work for me. They expect you to take less in most cases to get a closing, so why wouldn't they?
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Oct 10, 2010
Would you take less money for your home? Or less for your pay? I think not!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Oct 10, 2010
First, there are no black and whites positions in any business, and 100% of nothing, is nothing. That said, my advice is for agents to take the time, perhaps even invest in negotiating classes or sales courses on how to protect your commissions. But my email is to address the
Specific Comment of Isfcco Isfcco, Both Buyer and Seller, Champaign, IL: My brokerage requires that the listing agent be present in the home for every showing. Frankly, I get more push-back from Buyer's agents on this that buyers, and frankly it has saved and made many deals. It is amazing to see the variation in competency and preparation. Agents showing up not even knowing the square feet, price or details on the community are common. Agents that have studied, know the details and have value to add are less common. I agree with Isfcco: The listing agent should be there if at all possible. Why? We are paid to sell. We are paid to influence. We are paid to overcome objections and provide information. If the Buyer's agents would utilize the listting agents more this would be a muchmore enjoyable occupation, and buying and selling clients would be better served. Defaulting to a 30 word email to debrief a showing is pretty poor. One deal we saved by being present was for a lovely home... a listing-agent's dream really... It was built on a slab. During the showing, the buyer said, "I would never buy a home on a slab... they are nothing but trouble.", the buyers agent simply said. "OK" and they headed out the door. Had I not been there to explain the type of slab we had, and that were no HVAC, electric, gas, or water lines in the floor we would not have made the sale. The buyer had no issues with the slab except that untilities can be expensive to repair if encased in the floor. That was not the case. You can't sell, you can't represent, if you don't show up!
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 29, 2014
Real estate commission fees are always negotiable. Talk with your agent regarding your concerns over making the deal work. There are always options available that can be a win-win situation for both you and the buyer.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Jun 11, 2014
How would you feel if your boss asked you to take a cut in pay so he/she can balance the books? Every situation is different and I really can't make a blanket statement one way or the other but typically the agent shouldn't be expected to take a discount.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Jun 11, 2014
House sales typically net a 6% commission. This is typically split between two agents, so 3% each. Then the agent splits a percentage with their broker, which is usually a 50/50 split. Considering the average cost of a home in the United States is $285K, the average realtor is making (after taxes) about $3200 per sale.

The average Realtor makes $40,000.00 a year.

So, no. It's pretty crappy to ask a person who works their butt off for every cent they get to take a pay cut. Only 1% of Realtors are making $30K commissions.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Jun 11, 2014
Do you ask the person that you work next to to take a pay cut to make a deal work? Are you willing to take a pay cut just to make a customer happy? Whatever business that you are in I think the answer is no! So why should a Realtor? First, commission is paid to the Broker, not the Realtor. Franchise fees (in many cases) relocation fees and more are deducted from an Agent's commission. So why would this be any different from a Doctor, Dentist, secretary or anyone else? Broker's and Realtors are free to discount a commission but in the majority of cases, you get what you pay for. And after negotiating a deal, inspections, advertising and much more should a realtor be asked to cut their commission to make a deal work? Please enlighten me!

Frank Dolski MBA, ABR, e-PRO
Associate Broker
Certified Relocation Specialist
Previews Luxury Home Specialist
Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors
215-803-3237 (mobile)
215-794-1070 x-103
f.dolski@cbhearthside.com
http://www.FrankDolski.Com

2006-2013 Top Producing Agent and Agent of the year for Coldwell Banker Hearthside in Lahaska Office!
2013 Coldwell Banker President’s Circle Recipient – Top 6% of all Coldwell Banker International Realtors.
Ranked in the top 1% of all Bucks County Realtor in 2013!
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 22, 2014
No, it is not standard procedure to do that, even though I have done it a couple of times on short sales only.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 22, 2014
i can only tell you about my current experience. i had someone come to go over a contract to sell my home. 30 years in the business with a reputable company. once the concessions were discussed i signed the contract. i told him the house needed repairs and i might be able to get the money to do so. adjusting the price and/or taking off the market may be a concern. he told me he would make the necessary changes in the contract and send me a copy. 90 days was discussed. i know i'm stupid and trust people at their word. never got a contract. originally told him to text me as phone signal isn't great in the neighborhood he complied with that for about a week. all phone calls after that. simple. TEXT ME. no mention of repairs needed on the listing. people came to look expecting turnkey with a 80k discount. no offers. i asked about the contract. "oh ill send you one" never saw the agent showing my house. never got the contract. it's been months. im feeling pressure to sell. "you need to drop the price 40000 to make it a fast sale. i agree to do this. "I know some builders that would be interested at that price" weeks go by. no calls. no showings. no nothing. after 9 phone calls. 9. 9 in a row cause 1 or 2 in a day get no response. i ask about investigating other options and getting out of my contract. look at selling for cash as it seems like we are just waiting for foreclosure to pick up the property at a sizeable discount and a complete loss for me. him: "the contract doesn't expire until december". me: "So it was a 9 month contract? this wasn't discussed at all." him: "well you should have asked for a contract at the onset" me: "but i did" him:"we keep going in circles. let me make some phone calls as i've been telling everyone about your property. in the mean time try cleaning up the house as i'm able to get around the repairs but the house isn't selling as it isn't clean enough. I'm tying to help you." "if no one has been here how does cleanliness effect selling the property? it isn't like i own 10 dogs and there's a giant pile of dog crap in the yard. it's a gated community. I'm on a culdesac with 6 houses on it. how much traffic is a big sign on my lawn going to draw? I'm having difficulties and need to sell. I didn't pay my taxes this year. won't be able to this year. So the only way that can happen is through this guy and if he doesn't sell it I'm basically out of luck. I lose my house which is paid for. in a week i contacted 3 fast cash places and one agreed to buy the property and basically save my life. give me basically what i'd get without the agent at it's current price. pay all closing and hidden agendas. unfortunately the real estate agent i hired is going to make that impossible and wants the 15000 commission for putting on the mls as was said before. do i piss him off and call the broker and ask to be removed as a listing? pretty much ensures if he gets mad enough he just sits on the property until it goes into foreclosure auction. real estate people aren't your friend nor do they wish to help you. they want to make money any way they possibly can. they like inside information and most likely it's how they live in the house they do. i disagree with the earlier post. it's not the honest ones that survive. it's the bloodsuckers that do. are you telling me that the laws of physics apply to everyone but real estate agents? lol whoever said that one is laughable. the last person i would ever trust is someone in real estate again.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Apr 21, 2014
Sounds like you had a very unfortunate experience. There are alot of unprofessional people in the world including real estate. I would speak to the broker if you feel the agent is not doing their job. Remember agents work on commissions so its in their best interest to get your house sold, sitting on a listing won't put a nickel in your agents pocket. Generally the reason a home doesn't sell is because its over priced or underserviced. If you are not getting showings when its in the mls there is a good chance the price isn't right. Buyers want a clean home at a good price. It doesn't have to be the lastest in updates. There are tons of foreclosures out there so you have some stiff competion. I wish you luck and hang some garlic around your neck to keep the bloodsucker away.
Flag Tue Apr 22, 2014
Realtor's are either not savvy in the mathematics of a good offer or they are disingenuous and misleading their buyers, it's not both. The woman Realtor I made an offer to had ZERO commission split on a cash deal and would not concede even five hundred dollars to get it across the finish line. Here is where she is completely WRONG, any new deal placed with a Realtor will mean a commission split anyway, her business acumen and that of her manager are deplorable as is the entire industry, it's dirty and so are it's minions.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Jan 23, 2014
Thats like your employer paying you less than your regular salary. Would you mind if your employer did not pay your wage? Is that fair? What if your property sold for more than expected, would you pay your agent more?

Perhaps you signed a listing contract. If you did, the agent pay has already been established.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 14, 2014
There is no right or wrong answer to this question. I guess the question back to you is would you take a pay cut to stay at your current job? Would you ask a doctor to take less for his surgery?
Would you ask a dentist to take less or for that matter you car dealer, banker or anyone else? Sometimes yes, sometimes we do, but it is not always up to the realtor, they often need to ck with their broker and sometimes it comes out of just the agents pocket. I guess what I am asking you is do you ask everyone to take less or just expect realtors to? We only get paid when deal closes and not for all the clients we drive around for who never buy or rent. We do not get weekly pay checks so when you see a large commission it may cover a longer period of time then just the few hours put in with you. In general most realtors will work together and do what it takes to close a deal.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Aug 24, 2013
Chris,
I could debate this all night. My clients get more money in a shorter period of time. I invest alot of time and money in my business and I am very sucessful. Can only speak for myself and my broker so no I am not kidding.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Aug 24, 2013
You've got to be kidding me! For 80% of brokers out there, they simply drive to homes and point out the obvious: here is the kitchen; here are the Viking, high end appliances; here is the spacious living room.... Really! I can see that and don't need you to point it out. There are always exceptions to the rule, but for the most part brokers don't do much to cash that check. They absolutely should be willing to cut commissions for their client. Thw advant of key boxes means the selling agent doesn't even need to be there. Yeah, you're really working hard for that check. With today's Internet and free flow if information, buyers are pretty well educated and informed.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Aug 24, 2013
You must be kidding? Would you take less pay?
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Aug 24, 2013
All I can say if your agent is willing to reduce his or her own fee for the hard work and effort to put a deal together, how hard will he or she work for you?? Get someone who will fight for the best deal for you.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Aug 24, 2013
I guess it depends on the realtor. I personally will reduce my commission if that is what is going to get my clients the house or get my sellers out of the house. I think there is more to what I do then the amount I make. Sure its nice to not have to reduce your commission but this is a job that involves working with people and doing what is right for them. I would never want to be the person standing between a client and their home so yes I would reduce my commission.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Aug 23, 2013
The public really does not understand how most realtors get paid.

Listings (both buyer and seller) belong to the real estate company where your Realtor holds his/her license. Realtors are not allowed to unilaterally cut their commissions. Only the Broker can do that. As an Independent Contractor (realtor) they are under a contractural agreement with their broker and must abide by the commission structure that they agreed to as an Independent Contractor. The contractural agreement between the Broker and the Realtor also indicates the percentage of the listing fee that the company will keep from each transaction. The Realtor gets to keep the remainder. The national average income for a Realtor is $55k. This is before any taxes or business expenses are paid. They have no retirement fund, 401k or health insurance paid by their employer, so you can see realtors' pockets are not always the deepest.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Aug 3, 2013
Absolutely not, we work hard for that money and I refuse to lower my commission!
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Aug 1, 2013
With the internet, it seems like everyone is looking for the best deal and many sites are devoted to doing just that. As realtors, we do not like to cut commission to make a deal work simply because we take a chance on our paycheck every day. If your home does not close, I dont get paid so I work my butt off to get that deal to closing. And unlike most people, I do not get a paycheck every week or every other week. My paycheck takes 30-45 days in most cases.

To answer your questions, the situation really depends. If you are already bringing thousands to closing then yes I would consider cutting commission to get the deal done but if you just cant bring the money to closing because you spent it on a new boat...then we have a problem.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Aug 1, 2013
If it's a good market the house will sell for a premium and the broker thinks they are a star. If it's a lousy market their solution is to keep lowering the price. What value added do they really bring to the table? List and show it...wow...Here is an exercise for you. go to realtor.com and look at houses for sale in your area. Look at the pictures these so called experts post. Toilets and sinks in the pictures..Way to be creative..........
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Mar 6, 2013
This question is so important and why agents need to go over the net proceeds statement with the seller when they sign a listing agreement. It needs to be pointed out clearly what the total commission payout is and how it will effect the seller's bottom line. It is a big number, sometimes it is earned easy, sometimes it isn't earned so easy. The agent does take financial risk with a listing not selling (photographer, marketing, open house, etc and time away from the family)....if it doesn't sell, its a direct loss to the agent. Same with a buyer's agent....take them out to several properties and they flake out and disappear. Also a loss for the agent with gas & time that could be used for more productive business. Back to the topic about commission cuts...a good agent would not be threatened by a potential cut of commission to make a deal happen, especially if its a sizable sale. It's not working round the clock for one listing or sale, its working with about 10 different deals at once. Some will net bigger than others, some not at all....but it is what it is. Again, comparing our industry to doctors, lawyers, dentists, etc...that is silly. Not to mention disrespectful to the tough degrees they have earned. Real Estate is not rocket science...but the difference is experience, contacts, networks and social skills that put value on it. We are more like teachers...you always remember the good ones and the bad ones.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Mar 3, 2013
The answer simply is that we, as professional and conscientiousness agents should always find the best solution for any situation. My philosophy of the more you give, the more you get in life can be tested in this situation. Also, we must remember, we make a living by what we make, and we make a life by what we give. Ok, hope everyone feels a little better after all that.

If you like the message if you agree.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Feb 25, 2013
Please. Honest Realtors of USA. Answer This:

Who thinks:
Showing the Pre-Approved Loan amount to the Selling Agent and the Seller is a great idea?

Who thinks the Selling Agent should take a hit in commission?

Who thinks the Buying Agent should take a hit in commission?

Am I crazy, or is it simply ignorant for a Buying Realtor to show the Pre-Approved Loan Amount to the Seller and the Sellers Agent?????
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Feb 25, 2013
it should be up the buyer's agent discretion whether or not to use it a pre-approval letter. As you may see it, its showing too many cards. The purpose of using it is to show the seller that the buyer has been vetted and isn't wasting anyone's time. Pre-approval letters can be customized over and over again for each home that is targeted and its listing price. As for agents taking a hit, the listing agreement between the seller and the broker is agreed upon in advance before the home even hits the market. The seller enters into that agreement and only when thing are extraordinary should commissions be considered. Realtors don't pocket everything the public may think, we pay off some of that check to our broker, assistances, business expenses and income tax, etc...like everyone else.
Flag Sun Mar 3, 2013
Wow. This question was posed in 2010 and is getting some mad comments to this day in 2013! Most Realtors work hard for their commissions- some..ok- maybe most, do NOT. A standard commission today is still 6%. Short Sale Banks still pay 6%. Usually of that total of 6%, 3% is paid to the Buyers Brokerage- who works the hardest and is the transaction coordinator.
Since 2008, Buyers Brokers have been offered by Listing Brokerages only 2% or 2.5% in those 6% commissions sellers are paying. Therefore, the Listing Brokerage are either taking (greedy? YES!) 3.5% or taking listing commission reductions at 5%, paying themselves still 3%, and making the buyers Brokerage work for less 2 oor 2.5%. Therefore, I have to agree that in these cases the Listing Brokerages/ Realtors are not only GREEDY, but doing an injustice to the Sellers. This does not help the seller at all when we (buyers Brokers) see our commissions reduced to 2% or 2.5%! Sellers beware. Make SURE your listing Broker is honoring at least 3% for the Buyers Brokerage to show your home! Don't be cheap- thinking you are saving money- you are NOT. I have worked as a full time Realtor for over 13 years in Scottsdale AZ , but on this one I have to agree- if Sellers ask the Listing Brokers to reduce their commission....and allow the Listing Brokerage to take the big end of the stick...the Sellers are getting &%#@ and of course the Listing Realtor is Greedy. That is obvious Sellers.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Feb 25, 2013
If that is what it takes to get the deal done.... Then I always say "Something is better than nothing!"
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Feb 25, 2013
As a last resort some realtors may find the need to reduce the commission to get the deal closed; especially if the alternative is having the transaction cancel or fall apart. Of course any realtor would prefer not to, especially if they have put in a lot of work and hours. In every situation it must be looked at as a case by case scenario since it will be different every time. Call if you have any other questions 520-400-5735
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Feb 25, 2013
Do you think a Buying Agent should reveal the buyers pre-approved loan amount to the Seller and Seller Agent? Do you think it would be a fair offer for the Buyer to ask the agents to give up part of their commission for conspiring and to steal away the Buyers ability to affectively negotiate?
Flag Mon Feb 25, 2013
I preface the answer with a question. Would you take less money from your employer? Perhaps just once or every time? In any business, any job it is about the wages, salary and in this case, commission. So, to get what you pay for and if I am working for a certain commission, the value that I add and the level of service that my Broker, International company and I offer, is well worth it and it is a contractual fee. Therefore, I refer back to my question to you! And furthermore, since I am ranked the #1 Realtor for Coldwell Banker International in Pennsylvania for 2012, should I charge more? I think not.

Respectfully,

Frank Dolski MBA, ABR, e-PRO
Associate Broker
Certified Relocation Specialist
Previews Luxury Home Specialist
Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors
2012 Coldwell Banker International President’s Elite Award
2010-2011 Coldwell Banker International President’s Circle Award
215-803-3237 (mobile)
215-794-1070 x-103
f.dolski@cbhearthside.com
http://www.FrankDolski.Com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Feb 25, 2013
For such a bright guy, you don't seem to get it. A Realtor offers a service. You *ARE*, in a sense, the Company providing services for a client. I am the Director of Information Systems for my company. If *I* offer services to a client, and I screw that up, then I have to right a wrong. That could mean that I reduce the overall price of the project. Is my boss going to pay me less because the project did not go as planned? No. My boss is not my client.
Flag Mon Feb 25, 2013
This is a joke. RE agents are, for the most part, worthless. As a buyer, when I enter a home and the agent so aptly points out the sub zero fridge, the such-and-such oven, the "powder room" is over here....what in the world are you doing to deserve thousands of dollars?
That was a very broad statement and paints all agents with the same brush, and that's not fair. The agent who sold my home in the city of Chicago did so in 4 days. We priced it right, listened to her every word of advice, and she actually SOLD my home (eg. didn't point out the obvious). She has earned my utmost respect and I've referred 3 others to her. She's the exception, not the rule. I would never consider asking her to give up commission, even when the buyer was nickle and diming us for a few thousand dollars. I offered the credit and never thought about asking her for support.
As a buying agent, you should assist where possible for the buyer. That doesn't mean you give up all your comission, but you should be willing to negotiate to get the deal done. All the ridiculous comments about "negotiating upfront", how do you know what home / situation you'll end up in? Be flexible.
It's also funny that the only "defendants' of not reducing the commission is agents. No one else seems to agree with you.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Aug 20, 2012
If an agent is not powerful enough to stand up for their own self worth how strong could they possible be when it comes defending you and the price we set on your home?
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Dec 1, 2010
I would say yes, but circumstances would dictate if this were appropriate or not. It depends on the need. I certainly want to make a deal happen particularly after I have put so much time and energy into a transaction, but I'm not going to do it despite myself. We are all adults and modivation is different for each of us. I would have to evaluate the hardship and determine how my response would effect the outcome. I'm all for a win-win scenario.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Dec 1, 2010
If they buyer and seller do not have the funds to contribute or are not willing, than yes, they should. You win some you loose some. Move on to the next deal and hope for 6%+ on that one. Is your agent experienced with working short sales? Find a good one:
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Dec 1, 2010
I think it is perfectly fine for your agent to help as long as it is still profitable for them. Agents are inundated with fees to belong to a variety of associations etc. So it's not a business that is easy to finance.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Dec 1, 2010
These are hard times which call for "Desparate Measures" some agents will take a cut!


Milly from Exit
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Dec 1, 2010
I agree that it depends on the situation. If I feel that my Buyer or Seller is willing to work with me in making the deal work, I am more likely to help. If, on the other hand, my Buyer or Seller is expecting me to make all concessions, I am less likely to consider it.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Dec 1, 2010
This question should have three parts:

The other two parts are:

Should the seller take lass the make a deal work?

Should the buyer pay more to make a deal work?
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Dec 1, 2010
With this economy, "SURE"
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Dec 1, 2010
I think that would depend on the circumstances. If I had to in order to make a deal work, I would certainly consider it. We work very hard and under normal circumstances that should not be asked of us, but there are times that it may be necessary.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Dec 1, 2010
Not just the realtor needs to make a deal work, everyone works on a deal so all sides need to agree on what they will get.
A buyer wants to spend as little as possible, the seller wants to make as much as possible and then the realtor wants as high of a commission as possible.
It all depends on what your current situation is.
If not all sides give in, then there will never be a deal.
So yes, if you ask me, the realtor also needs to see his commission lowerred, if that means a deal can go through. Better that they make a deal themselves than them not making any money.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Dec 1, 2010
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