Home Buying in 07030>Question Details

Buyer2011, Home Buyer in Bristol, NH

how to find and choose a buyer's agent?

Asked by Buyer2011, Bristol, NH Tue Oct 25, 2011

What kind of questions should I ask to help me choose a good buyer's agent?

Also, since I've not decided where to buy, can I have different agent for different area? say one for hudson county, one for union/moris if I can't find one that I like and is familiar with both area.

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Check out my blog on "Where to find and How to choose a great buyers agent"
http://www.circadianrealty.com/lifecycles-blog/entry/1/12

I am unfamiliar with how far apart these jurisdictions are, you might be able to find an agent that is familiar with both areas, but if you need 2 different agents just make sure that your agency agreement stipulates which jurisdiction they are representing you in, instead of the whole state etc...
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 25, 2011
John, dual agency is for those who are misinformed. If you think dual agency is better for buyers than single agency then you are as much misinformed as the poor saps that get sucked into dual agency.

Dual agency sucks, John, and if you push it then you have to live with youself. But don't kid yourself: go read the responses on this thread AND all over Trulia. The majority of agents these days have negative views on dual agency.

>>Why wouldn’t a buyer want an agent that can handle all aspects of the transaction?

Because buyers and sellers have opposite objectives, so no agent can properly negotiate for both. Simple as that. It's all about fiduciaries, and Dual Agents and seller's agents can't give them to the buyer.

Sorry, John, it's not a vast conspiracy. Buyers just get it these days and want somebody looking out for them. Dual agents don't look out for anybody in particular but they do look for that double commission. You are fighting a losing battle. Dual agency will be gone in a few years.
4 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 7, 2011
John,

Seriously, stop instigating.... This is very unprofessional and an embarrassment to our profession.
4 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 7, 2011
Is this the best you have? All the posts after my post have done nothing.. N-O-T-H-I-N-G to explain what you do different to make the transaction easier or get the buyer more money as you state you can do.
All I see is a few clippings. Nothing more.

“We Don't have attorneys negotiate anything here in Ohio. I negotiate everything. Do I do more work than a Dual Agent? You bet your sweet bippy”

O.k.… What do you do? Tell me what you do different. I actually do twice as much when acting as a dual agent. which is harder when facilitating a transaction.. rather than the imaginary “stand opposed” stance that these so called “exclusive buyers agents” do…

I AM a buyer’s agent.. Of course and I am! We ALL ARE.. Unless we have a buyer on our own property our or within the same company!

So to anyone buying a home, why would they want to work with an agent that only understands how to handle one side of a transaction.. Why wouldn’t a buyer want an agent that can handle all aspects of the transaction? I would want someone that is educated in all situations.

“Honestly, John, I don't understand most of your comments.”

Exactly my point.

The reason I do not like what you call yourselves is that you are doing nothing but baiting the hook with different bait.. giving people the illusion that there are problems that only you can fix.. When in fact all you are doing is preying on the fears of first time homebuyers that unfortunately get channeled to posts and blogs about what you say you do … and these poor buyers do not know any better.
4 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 7, 2011
Hi Buyer,

You need to find an agent that you are comfortable with in the areas that you want to look for a home. In New Jersey, we are all buyer’s agents, seller’s agents and disclosed dual agents when and if the opportunity arises. If you choose to look at a listing that your agent has within their office or their own listing then they would become a disclosed dual agent. But, until that point.. We are all buyers agents.

Aside from you doing your due diligence as you should, ANY agent you deal with will be there to give you the correct to give you the information you need to make an informed decision. All realtors are trying to "put a deal together". It is a matter of finding the right one that gives you the proper guidance to make an informed decision.. That can be the listing agent, Buyers agent or Dual agent. Joining a "club" makes no difference.

I had a deal with a so called "exclusive buyers agent" and after a very nasty closing (nasty generated by this agent) the buyer paid $10,000 too much for the home! My seller client said.. take this amount and sell the house... and instead of coming into the negotiation calm and cool she came in with “THIS IS ALL WE ARE GOING TO PAY AND WE WANT THIS AND THAT FIXED!! The buyer’s agents insisted on a certain price which was 10k more than the seller was looking for! We said.. Sure!

I found out after the closing (at a party, as the house was in my neighborhood) the buyer was there and he was apprehensive to speak with me as I found out that the “buyer’s agent” lied to the buyer and told them all kinds of made up things... and how she was fighting for the buyer.. When in fact.. We were laughing and there were no issues!

At this stage of the game, you need to find an experienced agent in the area you want to find a home, continue your due diligence on Trulia and other sites to find that Realtor.. call and phone interview a few!
In the very rare chance that you look to purchase listing within the same company or your agent.. Then take the agency disclosures as they come about.
4 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 2, 2011
Buyer 2011,
There are Exclusive Buyer's Agents. We happen to be the only office of Exclusive Buyer's Agents serving eight counties of Northern NJ. We represent only Buyers and our position never changes. We never become a Seller's Agent or Dual Agent and never have a conflict of interest.

Across the country buyers can find an Exclusive Buyer's Agent by going to http://www.NAEBA.org. This is the National Association of Exclusive Buyer's Agents. Agents at open houses are typically listing agents. You can try phone interviews but what are you going to ask? Try asking how much of an agents business is listings versus working with buyers. How often have they been a "Buyer's Agent"? Are they going to tell you the pros and cons of a property or are they trying to sell you one? If an agent doesn't push you to buy this weekend while you are in their car you might be in another agent's car next weekend! A true Buyer's Agent is going to give you the information you need to make an informed decision and is not trying to "put a deal together". Best of luck with your home search!

Pam Bell, Exclusive Buyer's Broker
http://www.BuyersAdvisors.com
Serving Metropolitan NJ
4 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 1, 2011
- Most important, NEVER EVER use an inspector, attorney, mortgage broker recommended by your REALTOR.

I couldn't disagree more.
4 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Oct 27, 2011
Buyer2011, you might want to review sites such as: http://www.naeba.org/ or the site that REBAC has for home buyers. Both have something to offer buyers. REBAC's is content rich, but NAEBA's offers access to agents than don't do dual agency.

Clients that interview me often ask for references (which I provide) and they ask to see my contract - which I also provide. They want to know how many homes I have sold and where. They want to be able to have a discussion with me and know coming away that I understand the purchase and will be their advocate. You see, if the agent ends up as a dual agent they are no longer an advocate. When you see agents advertise buyer agent services most of the time there is a potential bait and switch component (without an appropriate disclaimer) because if their office also represents seller's and you want to see one of that company's listings they can NOT be a buyers agent. You can confirm this with any NJ real estate attorney.

By the way "Mack" had some good advice to "Private Home Buyer" below.
Whoever you end up choosing - you can be pretty sure if you find, in your questioning, one agent belittling another they are lacking in professionalism in other areas too. Find a decent agent and expect a lot from them - and let them know what you need -otherwise they can't help you.


Too bad I don't work in the area you are targeting! Good luck.
3 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 7, 2011
I think a good way to find and choose a buyer's agent is to utilize two avenues of research - one is to ask your friends who are homeowners if they recommend their agent(s), the second is to visit open houses in the areas you are interested in and talk to the agents there.

First and foremost, the overwhelming majority of problems between agents and clients has to do with communication styles, so talking to a few agents is a great way to see if you "get" each other.

Once you've found a few that you "click" with, then comes the qualification process. The problem with a checklist is that so many of the questions have no "right" answer. I think the basics is that an agent should be knowledgeable, trustworthy, and available.

Having talked to them, you should have a sense whether they share your ethical values, and whether they know enough about the areas you're looking in to be useful. So, from there, the last two things to find out are if they have enough time to devote to you, and if they're okay with your using another agent to look in another area.

All the best,
3 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Oct 26, 2011
There is one important way in which an exclusive buyer agent (EBA) is better than other agents that call themselves 'buyer's agents'.

An EBA will NEVER switch to dual agency. No other agent can promise that - because when you start working with them you don't know if eventually you will want to look at one of their (or their companies') listings.

EBA companies don't have listings. That is pretty simple. That fact alone doesn't make an EBA automatically better but it does mean that if the agent is better they can actually use that skill to help you. Any other agent potentially may be neutered by dual agency or even worse end up as the seller's agent. In either case, they can't advocate for you.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Dec 18, 2011
I think everyone should read all of John Sacktig's answers on this and all the other questions he has responded to. You will get a sense of what the word "obfuscation" means. As to the 'club' reference - anyone know what that means. Is he referring to being a Realtor?
2 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Dec 18, 2011
OOhh... Are you like the person Larry below? A Buyers Borker?

"I specialize in Buyer Borkering"

I got it Paul, but you are declaring how you choose to represent the client. Which goes back to the statement that we are all buyers, seller and dual agents until we designate how we are to operate within the transaction.. it is your choice to join a club.

The reason I do not like what you call yourselves is that you are doing nothing but baiting the hook with different bait.. Giving people the illusion that there are problems that only you can fix.. When in fact all you are doing is preying on the fears of first time homebuyers that unfortunately get channeled to posts and blogs about what you say you do … and these poor buyers do not know any better.

Do not get me wrong, I act as a buyers agent every day.. 75% of my transactions are as an "exclusive buyer's agent" ( I act exclusivly for the buyer). BUT, I will handle a client that comes in on my own listing when the time comes. I explain dual agency in detail and close the transaction.

No issues, no fighting, no problems.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 30, 2011
>>As far as two agents - that's probably a good plan - but please do be upfront with both agents about this so you don't run into hard feelings etc. later.

I disagree. Most agents will not "share" clients with somebody else. I know I won't. An agent is typically not going to invest their time and resources into helping you if you're not going to be loyal to them. That is bad business.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 23, 2011
One last thing, John.....

We don't have to "prey on anybody's fears." They come to us having heard horror stories from somebody that used a dual agent. You guys drive them right to us. So just keep doing what you do, and push that dual agency thing....
2 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 8, 2011
"Sorry, John, it's not a vast conspiracy"

I never said it was. Stop making things up like I said them. ( oh, that is part of what you do)

We are actually speaking about a minority of so called "exclusive buyers agents" that are out there, it is these agents that:are (as stated before).....The reason I do not like what you call yourselves is that you are doing nothing but baiting the hook with different bait.. giving people the illusion that there are problems that only you can fix.. When in fact all you are doing is preying on the fears of first time homebuyers that unfortunately get channeled to posts and blogs about what you say you do … and these poor buyers do not know any better.

I have had two encounters with agents that have this so called affiliation and there had been nothing but lies and deception to the poor home buyers from these agents.

I thank you guys for posting.. it has been eye opening for many. How so John? Eye opening in the fact that you have no answer, no response, nothing that shows me or anyone what you say you do.

But I have to say.. you guys tap dance pretty well.. as you danced around the issue with clippings and quotes.

Now, i am done. Thank you.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 8, 2011
This is getting nowhere this is very unprofessional like what Jane said, there is no point of doing this!
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 7, 2011
"giving people the illusion that there are problems that only you can fix"

When one is unable to make a valid counter point in a debate sometime the tactic of using a 'straw man' (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straw_man ) is utilized. This is what was done here. Sometimes that is done out of honest ignorance or inability to understand a position - but not always. Sometimes it is desperation. I think if you look back through the various comments of the poster of the above quote it will start to become clear why it was made. You may also make a judgement regarding the professionalism of said poster. The post was NOT made to further consumer education or promote the concept of consumer advocacy.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 7, 2011
With all due respect, you can't honor exclusive representation if you are a dual agency. Who do you represent? Do you represent the buyer or the seller to the best of your ability? If you choose either one, then you are not doing your job with the other. If you know of information that is of benefit to the buyer, would you use it against your seller or vice versa? Dual agency can never work with the same person, if it is dual agency with one brokerage, then it might work if the agents are clear as to who the represent.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 7, 2011
Rather than take just any agent's "opinion", you can actually checkout what the professionals have to say:

"A study by U.S. Sprint found that 232 relocating Sprint employees who hired buyer's brokers paid an average of 91% of a home's list price. People who use traditional agents typically pay about 96%."
House Hunting? Save By Hiring Your Own Broker - Carla A. Fried

“Unlike the traditional agent who looks out for the seller, a buyer-broker acts as your advocate … the best buyer brokers are so called exclusive agents – that is they represent buyers, never sellers, and thus are not tempted to push a house on which they stand to earn a double commission. You can find a true buyer broker in most states by stipulating you want an exclusive agent.”
-Money Magazine

“Always remember that a real estate broker does not work for you, but the seller If you want a broker on your side, get a buyer broker.”
-Reader’s Digest

“A conflict of interest is more likely when a real estate firm that represents sellers assigns you one of its brokers as a buyer agent. That’s why many people believe an “exclusive” buyer broker is preferable.”
- Business Week

“When buyers do not use an exclusive buyer broker, they are generally dealing with a professional, trained selling agent who has pledged to get the best price and terms possible for the seller.”
-Mobility Magazine

“Agents: How to hire one for your side.” “Most agents who show you homes don’t represent your interests. They work for the seller, and their objective is to sell the house at the highest possible price.”
-USA Today

“Exclusive buyer’s agents work only for consumers and often can save them money – and they don’t cost more to hire … Buyer’s agents are not tied to any particular property or agency, so they will show buyers any home, even those for sale by owner.”
-Los Angeles Times

“To protect themselves, buyers can retain their own exclusive representative, called a “buyer’s broker”. Your local agent may offer such services, but be aware that buyers’ brokers who also work as sellers’ brokers can sometimes end up on both sides of the deal.”
-Business Week

“Buyer Brokers: agents that buyer’s can call their own.” “If your real estate agent isn’t a buyer broker, he works for the seller.” “Buyers no longer have to fend for themselves.”
-U.S. News and World Report

“Your goal should be to engage an agent who will represent only your interests. Not just a ‘buyer broker’, but an exclusive buyer broker . Make sure that is what you are getting.”
–Joseph Eamon Cummings, author- Not One Dollar More

“Confusion often arises because many buyers believe that the agent who shows them houses works on their behalf. In fact, subagents of the listing broker — often they are agents who work for another office – also act on behalf of the seller.”
-The New York Times

“Many people don’t realize that, unless specifically stated otherwise, brokers are legal representatives of the sellers. A buyer’s broker, representing only the buyer, may be able to secure a better price and better terms.”
-Good Housekeeping

Traditionally, the real estate agent has always represented the seller of the house. So whenever you walk into an agent’s office and say something like, “I’m ready to offer $150K but would go as high as $160K if I had to,” that agent is duty-bound to tell the seller about your conversation.

Even though a traditional agent may spend hours and hours with you, her allegiance isn’t to you at all. It’s to the seller, and in this regard her main motivation is to get as much money out of you as possible. There are two reasons for this. One, it makes the seller happy to get a lot of money. Two, as we’ve seen, the agent’s commission is based on a percentage of the selling price. The more you pay, the more she makes.

There are many agents who will take exception to looking at their business so coldly. And there are many fine and ethical agents in the world. But the bottom line is that sellers’ agents are salespeople who make their living off commissions. Never forget that, no matter how nice they are.”
-The Motley Fool

Pam Bell, Broker
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 7, 2011
I've been called a lot of things, John, but never slimy. You would be hard-pressed to find anybody else who would call me that. Why, I'm an upstanding citizen, I pay my taxes, and I do my job well. But everybody is entitled to their opinion.

We don't have attorneys negotiate anything here in Ohio. I negotiate everything. Do I do more work than a Dual Agent? You be your sweet bippy. Why do agents engage in Dual Agency? Because its eaaassssyyyyyy.

Honestly, John, I don't understand most of your comments. But here's what I do know: I represent buyers, the seller's agent represents sellers, and everybody is happy with that. The buyers get representation, the seller gets representation, and nobody gets shafted. What's so wrong with that?

>>You do nothing more than any other agent. Listing, dual or buyer.

Just keep telling yourself that, John. But my clients, and the clients of Exclusive Buyer's Agents all over the country will never believe that. They have the internet, so they can research anything they want. And they all search for "buyer representation" because they know the difference.

I'm not going to engage with you, John. The consumers will make up their own minds.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 7, 2011
Jane, since you mentioned that rebates (your "incentives") are now legal in NJ (since Jan., 2010), you , or anyone else who is interested, might want to check the link below. It explains what is and isn't allowed in offering a rebate, and how it can be paid out.
Primarily, you, as an agent can't offer a rebate, as it must originate from the Broker as part of the company policy.....and it must be disclosed at the beginning of the transaction....as well as disclosed to all the parties involved in the transaction.
The following clearly explains it:

http://www.state.nj.us/dobi/bulletins/blt10_03.pdf

In addition, to answer your question regarding whether NJ is the only state where it is legal............actually, quite the opposite is true - NJ was one of the last states to make rebating legal........there are approximately only 9 states where it is still illegal. We were the 40th or 41st state to legalize it.

Sorry, Buyer2011 - I didn't mean to hijack your question, but wanted to clarify the NJ rebate issue so there was no misunderstanding or confusion by a consumer reading this.

Good luck!
2 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Nov 3, 2011
Thanks, Private.

The other thing is, there's just not enough money around to make it worth anybody's time to pay an agent for referrals. If anything, it would go the other way. An inspector charges, what, $400? If they have to split that with their company, what's the lead worth? $25? A mortgage broker charges 1% of the loan, on a $200,000 loan, that's $2000, and that gets split between the rep and the company.

Title companies used to spend to create loyalty, but again - title insurance would be, what, $750? Escrow $600? They'd bring cookies to the real estate office, maybe, but kickbacks, not so much.

All the best, Private!
2 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 1, 2011
Thanks Mack for a detailed explanation. It makes sense. Personally I don't like anyone in any business that gets kick backs or referral fees, just because, according to me, its conflict of interest.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 1, 2011
Exactly Mack. Could not have said it better!
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Oct 31, 2011
Private, with all due respect, you are absolutely wrong.

We do not get "kickbacks," that would be a RESPA violation, which is too serious to try to nick an inspector out of $50 for.

The world isn't out to get you, and we are not conspiring against you. By the logic of an agent putting their self-interest first, It is in the agent's best interest for you to have the lowest loan costs, so you can borrow more, buy more, and generate a larger commission. It is in the agent's best interest to have an honest and capable inspector find and identify defects, so that the agent isn't sued or harrassed after the sale. And title companies are just cheap!

Thanks for the softball!
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Oct 31, 2011
This is a good place to begin your search. Go to the find a pro section and put in the area of interest. Talk to/interview several agents. While it may be that one agent can service you in all areas, she may not have the local expertise you are looking for so stress that point. Let me describe a live situation I have in play - I have a buyer who has three different target areas. I can show and sell in all, but my area of real expertise is one of them. So I am lining up referral agents to assist in the other two areas so that the out of area Buyer gets the local expertise he's looking for. The Buyer benefits from my screening agents to find a good one, and I benefit if the search moves elsewhere by getting a referral fee as a thank you from the agent I've lined up as a referral. It costs you nothing and is the way agents thank one another. I think a process that is define has a greater likelihood of success.

My particular area of expertise is Somerset County and parts of Morris County, if you find yourself moving this direction please remember me. Many buyers starting at points east of us do migrate out our way. I have an existing referral relationship established in Union/Morris -- the agent is patient and gracious and knows her market cold. If that would be a useful starting point, please reach out to me and I'll bet you in touch.

Good luck to you,
Jeanne Feenick
Unwavering Commitment to Service, Unsurpassed Results
2 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Oct 26, 2011
Ask every agent to describe the practice of real estate as to type of agency. Your in NH, but in FL they do transactional brokerage without any requirementt for disclosure or discussion. Buyers in FL need to get an agent to admit their only role is to fasilitate the transaction and not provide advantage to either seller or buyer. So dont just go for the big name agent, understand how agency rules work in your state and seek advocacy and full fiduciary care. Cracks me up how FL agents have this great advice and never comment to the transactional brokerage model and that agents role is diminshed to keeping a deal together and facilitating the transaction and no need to discuss or disclose get signatures on a piece of paper that describes how agency works in FL.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jan 8, 2012
Ask a friend or family member that has worked with a realtor. Ask them to sahre their experiences.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Thu Jan 5, 2012
So to summarize your response John, You do NOT ever check the box that says you: Represent the Buyer Only. And, whenever you do claim to be a buyer's agent, you leave open FOR YOURSELF the option to switch to dual agency and you will in that event represent the seller in the same transaction -apparently in the process you lead the buyer to believe it does not affect them or your representation at all.

My claim is that I will not switch alliances. It will always be the buyer. I also believe that on average a buyer with an advocate (whether that advocate is an EBA or not) working as their agent will do better than one that does not have an advocate.

Lastly, I believe, John Sacktig, that the prospect that consumers will at some point realize they are better off with a true buyer's agent (An EBA) that works under a business model that excludes the possibility of switching or diminishing alliances scares you silly. It shouldn't. There are companies that work exclusively for sellers too.
Web Reference: http://www.naeba.org
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Dec 19, 2011
John, you can say what you will, but an informed buyer always choose buyer agency over dual agency. And as far as "scaring first-time buyers" they are scared from the stories they hear from other buyers who used a dual agent.


>>It's really easy, just walk in to your local realtor like Coldwell Banker, Intero, Better Homes and Garden and just talk to the agents in the office.

Nah, that's not how you pick a buyers agent. Even if you don't believe in exclusive buyer's agency that is not how you find a buyers agent.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Dec 18, 2011
It is difficult enough for consumers to find someone to represent them without having to deal with agents intent on obfuscation through the use of straw men. This statement: " Giving people the illusion that there are problems that only you can fix." is intentionally deceptive and misleading and is a straw man. And is disparages those agents that have chosen a business model that limits them to representation that does not result in divided loyalty.

Further, ONLY agents that work for offices exclusively representing buyers can be "Exclusive Buyer Agents" for the very definition (including that used by NAR, NAEBA and HUD) MEANS that the agent works for an office exclusively representing buyers. If you make a statement that you are an "Exclusive Buyer Agent" and you work for an office that takes listings and represents sellers you are making an intentionally false statement. ie You are intentionally lying. Professional agents do not do that. If you have the 'illusion' that there are problems that only an EBA can fix - it is simply your delusion. What an EBA can do is to guarantee that their full representation of a buyer will not be suddenly limited due to the conflict created when the agent's company represents a buyer and a seller in the same transaction? Buyers can choose whatever agent they wish - the should though have informed consent when they make that choice. Being an EBA does not guarantee that the agent is 'better' than a non-EBA. It does mean that the skills they have will not be neutered by dual agency.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Dec 18, 2011
Buyer, please, oh please say that by now you have made a decision!!!

If, after 109 responses, you still need more "advice", no problem., I am sure more will be coming your way!

Good luck.........

ps.... and, for the record - you should have a Hudson County agent, as well as one (or 2) who really know Morris and Union Counties......much will depend on the towns you select...there is no 1 agent who can cover those 3 counties and have expertise in all......
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 30, 2011
>>Go to the find a pro portion on this website for the area you are looking in and see who are on the first page, pick on of the top ten and you will be alright!

That wouldn't be my answer. The "pros" are merely agents who paid to get the "pro" designation on Trulia. It has nothing to do with experience, ability or knowledge. Some of the best agents in my area aren't even on Trulia, let alone listed as "pro." I wouldn't use that as some type of measuring stick.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 30, 2011
Hi Buyer,

You need to find an agent that you are comfortable with in the areas that you want to look for a home. In New Jersey, we are all buyers agents, sellers agents and disclosed dual agents when and if the opportunity arises. If you choose to look at a listing that your agent has within their office or their own listing then they would become a disclosed dual agent. But, until that point.. we are all buyers agents.

At this stage of the game, you need to find an experienced agent in the area you want to find a home, continue your due diligence on Trulia and other sites to find that Realtor.. call and phone interview a few!

Never- Ever sign any documents that tie you to one agent like a "buyers agency agreement" this is NOT in your best interest, if the agent asks you to sign one, think about the motivation in doing so...

And in the very rare chance that you look to purchase listing within the same company or your agent.. Then take the agency disclosures as they come about.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 30, 2011
Are they Exclusive Buyers Agents or do they take listings. Know the difference.

Yes, you can use more than one depending on the contract.


Tom Coler
Broker/Owner
Buyer's Broker of Southwest Florida
800.331. GULF (4853)
http://www.buyersbrokerswflorida.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 29, 2011
If you need an agent, it is always best to talk with your friends and family. Odds are one of them has purchased recently and can refer you to a good qualified agent.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 29, 2011
>> Don't sign any paperwork or contracts binding you to one agent.

Not necessarily. Just remember, if you don't sign an agreement with a buyer's agent they don't have to be loyal to you, either. And they can work with you casually if they want. An agreement is a two-way street. An agreement is from your agent, not just a promise TO your agent.....
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 29, 2011
First, you are the buyer and you have the power. A good buyers agent helps you. Spend time and find the right agent for you. Don't sign any paperwork or contracts binding you to one agent. The right agent doesn't need to bind you contractually to help you find the right house he does it naturally.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 28, 2011
One more thing.. what the heck is an "area saturated agent" ?

Kind of like when my sister in law said one time that she would "infomate" something.. I said wtf is that? She said it meant to gather information.. I said she was nuts.. it is not a word. But she said it so convincingly that I looked it up.. it is not a word.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Nov 27, 2011
Hi Buyer,

You need to find an agent that you are comfortable with in the areas that you want to look for a home. In New Jersey, we are all buyers agents, sellers agents and disclosed dual agents when and if the opportunity arises. If you choose to look at a listing that your agent has within their office or their own listing then they would become a disclosed dual agent. But, until that point.. we are all buyers agents.

At this stage of the game, you need to find an experienced agent in the area you want to find a home, continue your due diligence on Trulia and other sites to find that Realtor.. call and phoe interview a few!

And in the very rare chance that you look to purchase listing within the same company or your agent.. Then take the agency disclosures as they come about.

Call or Email!

John Sacktig
Broker / Manager
Orange Key Realty
JSacktig@orangekeyrealty.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 22, 2011
I recommend to contact a few Realtors you find through word of mouth or advertisements and conduct an interview. Also if you know of anyone in the area ask them who they would referral if they were looking to buy a home. The Realtor will be working for you, so you want to be comfortable with his or her personality, energy level, typical work hours and plan for helping you find the perfect home!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 21, 2011
The best place to start is ask a friend or relative who they used. If you know someone who has used a buyers agent and they had a great experience with them then ask for a referral. People you trust to give you a good referral is a great place to start!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 21, 2011
Great question,
I would first look for the professional designation ABR (Accredited Buyers Representative). This will ensure you have a good starting point. Since agents are not paid by the buyers (in California) you can get the best representation for free! Interview a few and see which one you can easily and comfortably talk to and who listens to your needs and wants. Once you find that agent, discuss your areas of search and they will tell you if they are part of the MLS in that region. Keep in mind that most agents are looking at the same houses and data so bouncing from one agent to another is not in your best interest or the agents. Once you have picked one...stay with them unless you feel you are not being represented. Good luck with your home search!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 21, 2011
John, it does have to do with Dual Agency. A Buyer's Agent representing a client as they should would have made sure they had a formal contract that would not have let the owner back out. A Buyer's Agent would have advised the client not to spend money on an inspection UNTIL they had a solid contract, whether it was a land contract or whatever creative financing was being used. A Buyer's Agent may have even advised the client that (maybe) they were not qualified and should not have entered into this deal to being with. It was the Dual Agent trying to get his listing sold that wanted the buyer to go ahead no matter what and is probably still pushing him to overextend himself. Whether the buyer was qualified or not he did not have an agent representing his interests.


Pam Bell, Exclusive Buyer's Broker
http://www.BuyersAdvisors.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 9, 2011
You have to search and you must feel comfortable with your agent whatever decision you might like. Through my experience with other real estate agents, they had push me around and when i decided to withdraw the listing of my property two of them felt so bad and took it personal!
The worst experienced i ever had was the last one i had, she brainwashed me and pushed me so much . I was forced to follow her!The person was even very experienced . I got scared and ashamed to back out, believe me , you have to search a lot, i am not selling myself to you just be careful, there are lots of them who are really there to help you and not just care about the commission they are gonna get out of the sale!
We have to earn money too, but, it has to be balanced..
Good luck to you!!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 9, 2011
Pick an agent that you TRUST.Ask about their experience. Ask how long they have lived/worked in the area. Look them up on the MLS and read their client reviews. Best to stick with one agent as opposed to working with multiple. A buyers agent is someone that will represent and negotiate on your behalf, so you want someone that you connect and feel comfortable with.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 8, 2011
Ah, if it only were done. I don't think obfuscation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obfuscation) and staw men trump numerous national consumer advocates and HUD and NAR and NAEBA.

I think every person but one 'gets' that it isn't what EBAs do that is the distinguishing factor. It is what they do not do - and EBAs do NOT EVER represent a buyer and seller in the the same transaction because they NEVER represent sellers.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 8, 2011
Wow....tension on the boards today. I will just say that dual agency is ILLEGAL in Florida....good day folks!!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 7, 2011
In HUD's settlement cost booklet (a PDF is here: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/documents/huddoc?id=DOC_12164.pdf ) they recommend on page 6 (dealing with the role of the real estate agent or broker) that home buyers consider "...hiring an "exclusive buyers agent," who will be working for you." In HUD's booklet the part in quotes is in bold. The National Association of Realtors (NAR) and the National Association of Exclusive Buyer Agents (NAEBA) define exclusive buyer agents the same way. Basically that definition is Exclusive Buyer Agents are agents that work for brokerage firms that EXCLUSIVELY represent home buyers. They are known in some quarters as EBAs.

They (EBAs) tend to be passionate about what they do and they hold the concept of consumer advocacy in high regard. They believe that a consumer with an advocate will do better than one that does not have an advocate. There is one area, though, in which the FACT that they are an EBA can make them a better choice. If an agent is NOT an EBA there is a possibility that they may have to switch or neuter their fiduciary duties to become a dual agent or transaction agent. This would happen if the agent or the agent's company already are working for (listing) the seller of a home the consumer may wish to buy.

There are some excellent agents that end up in the dual agent (or in some cases transaction agent) position but they are then expressly forbidden by state laws from advocating for either the buyer or seller in a way that would favor one side over the other.

The choice of a buyer's agent matters. In some areas EBAs are not available but if they are, including one, or more, in the list you are deciding from (as recommended by HUD) can be a wise choice. Every EBA is NOT better than every other buyers agent but if you get one with the needed skills (and they work hard to hone them because that is all they do) you will know they won't end up neutered and unable to be your advocate. They will be with you start to finish and on your side.

Good luck in your search.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 7, 2011
>>It is a matter of finding the right one that gives you the proper guidance to make an informed decision.. That can be the listing agent, Buyers agent or Dual agent. Joining a "club" makes no difference.

I couldn't agree less. I've spent 16 years disproving this mentality. Buyer2011, just read blogs and you'll see. It DOES matter what kind of agent you pick, as a seller and especially as a buyer. If you are a buyer (which you are) Dual Agency "representation" is the ABSOLUTE WORST option you could pick. A close second is buying a home from the seller's agent with NO representation.

People can say what they want. Seller's agents say all kinds of things about Exclusive Buyer's Agents because they've never seen anything like us before. However, a good seller's agent will have nothing but praise for what we do. The seller's agents that I co-op with respect and admire what I do. And I surely keep them honest by advocating for the buyer.

Nuff said.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 7, 2011
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