Home Buying in 01109>Question Details

Thomasina, Both Buyer and Seller in Springfield, MA

Why do realtors ask if you already have a realtor when you request to see a home?

Asked by Thomasina, Springfield, MA Sun Mar 21, 2010

Is it not easier for a buyer who has a realtor to have the seller's realtor show them a home, and then let their own realtor know if they want to make an offer? When you go to an open house buyers don't go with their realtors, so why can only buyers see a home if their realtors go with them? Is it against some rule to have the buyer call the seller's realtor directly to arrange viewing times?

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Answers

12
It's fairly simple.

Realtors ask if you already have a Realtor, because if you do, then your Realtor should be making the appointment for you... it's part of their job, and they want to do it.

We, as listing agents, don't want to step on the toes of an existing relationship that you have with your Realtor, if you already have one. If you tell us that you don't have one, then we see that as an opportunity to create our own relationship with you, and perhaps become your Realtor.

And no, it's not easier to see a home with the listing agent, in fact it can create some complications that you might want to avoid... situations that have been discussed all over Trulia and other websites, such as procuring cause problems, and dual agency situations. Do yourself a favour and search those terms, and learn about them.

Open houses are "neutral territory", and buyers are welcome with or without their Realtor... (although we'll likely still ask if you're working with a Realtor)...

Good luck and enjoy your search.
3 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Mar 21, 2010
Alan May, Real Estate Pro in Evanston, IL
MVP'08
Contact
Your buyer broker should view all homes with you to ensure the home is in good working order...
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I'd be very hesitant to represent myself this way, as I am not an inspector, and am not qualified, nor insured, to assure my client that they're purchasing a home in good working order. That's the job of the professional inspector that I highly recommend they hire for any potential purchase.


if their website, sign, postcard, or any other marketing material leads you to call them directly without your buyer broker then they are entitled to the entire commission.
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procuring cause is much more than just "who found, or showed them the home first"... just because the website, sign or postcard first attracted them, does not (in and of itself) entitle one to the entire commission. Procuring cause is an "unbroken chain of events leading to the eventual sale of a property". That bespeaks more than mere marketing... that presumes an ongoing relationship, that may involve: home search, writing a contract, negotiation, inspection, interaction with attorneys & lenders... and plenty more.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Mar 24, 2010
Alan May, Real Estate Pro in Evanston, IL
MVP'08
Contact
A buyers agent will have your best interest in mind and try to get you the best deal.

A seller's agent is working for the seller and trying to get them the best price. Their main interest is to get the best deal for their seller.

I hope this helps!
Cathy
Web Reference: http://www.WinsorRealty.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Mar 28, 2010
- Is it not easier for a buyer who has a realtor to have the seller's realtor show them a home, and then let their own realtor know if they want to make an offer?

Hmmm.

You know, I think that it's as easy for one to show as it is the other one, especially since we don't know how difficult it is for either one to get over to the house at a particular time.

So, generally speaking, I don't see any specific energy savings in having the Seller's agent show you the home, rather than your own agent.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Mar 24, 2010
Thomasina:

1. Your buyer broker should view all homes with you to ensure the home is in good working order and that you are getting a good home.

2. Real estate is considered a business of procurring cause and that means that if their website, sign, postcard, or any other marketing material leads you to call them directly without your buyer broker then they are entitled to the entire commission.

3. The largest concern for you is if you sign a buyers agent contract and call the listing agent directly then you might find yourself in a situation where you might have two commissions to pay. You will have the listing agents and then have to pay your buyer broker out of your pocket.

Best of luck
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Mar 22, 2010
Even if you go through an open house by yourself you should go back to the house with your agent .The agent should see the house to guide you when making an offer.
Before the buyers agent shows homes the agent has information about the buyer . You do not want to give the seller's agent information that can hurt your negotiations. I am curious as to what you expect your agent to do for you . The most time consuming part of a buyer's agent's job is showing homes.
Agency contract and procuring cause are some of the things to be considered and you need to talk to an attorney about these things.
If you have a contract with an agent , another agent cannot interfere with the relationship and that is why they ask you if you are working with an agent.
Web Reference: http://www.gitabantwal.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Mar 22, 2010
Pretty much all of the real estate agents here gave great answers. But I will say is if you already have a real estate agent and you are asking another real estate agent to show you a house,that should tell you that you need to terminate the exclusive buyer broker agreement with that real estate agent if you have one. Most real estate agents won't bother showing you a house if you don't have a exclusive buyer broker agreement signed with them. http://www.buyandsellnewhomes.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Mar 14, 2014
Thomasina, If you are working with an Agent then that Agent should show you a property if you are interested in it. Sellers Agents do not show their own listings to clients who are working with someone else. It's just unethical to call around for Sellers agents to show you homes when yo have a buyers agent. Your buyers agent should do the work. In some cases a Sellers agent won't pay the commission to your Realtor if you called direct.
Web Reference: http://www.mdmrealtyinc.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Mar 22, 2010
Thomasina the other part of it is if you have signed a buyers contract with a Realtor® the listing agent may be due buyers commission for doing the paperwork for you and you may have to pay the Realtor® that you signed a buyer broker agreement with. The Code of Ethics requires us to ask if you have an exclusive relationship agreement established with another Realtor® to prevent that from happening.
Web Reference: http://www.Find1Home.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Mar 22, 2010
It's all about the money and who is the agent entitled to a portion of the commission. In MA the buyer is asked to sign an Agency Form - this form goes inwith the offer and that agent gets the commission. This is NOT a contract and a buyer has the right to go with any agent they want. Buyers change agents all the time.

If you sign an Exclusive Right for Representation, then you are bound to stay with the agent you are currently working with. No other agent can represent you. When times are slow (as they have been in the last year) agents are trying to hold on to their buyer.

Open Houses are shown thru the Listing Agent - he/she represents the Seller - if you walk into the property without you agent, the listing agent shows you the property and is working forthe full commission. If you do not tell them you are working with an agent, do not expect your agent (who did not accompany you) to put in the offer (the only change to this is if you realtor contacts the selling agent and tells them that you are coming without them).

A buyer working with an agent should not contact the selling agent for a viewing. Your agent is not considered the contributing factor to the sal. It's like you (selling agent) doing all the work and someone else getting paid for it.

Good luck.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Mar 22, 2010
Alan gave one half of the reason. The other half is that if you do not have an agent the realtor can bug you a lot trying to make you their client.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Mar 21, 2010
Simple. Listing agents pay (generally) 50% of the commission to the buyers agent. We expect buyer agents to do half the work, and that means showing property.

More importantly, if your buyer agent has seen the home, or seen other homes that you're looking at, he can't help you very much with pricing, comparables, and developing options for finding you that right house. I would ask your question a different way: If you aren't seeing houses with your broker, why bother having one?

Here's another way to look at it. You pull in to get gas at a station that offer full serve, and self serve. The prices are more expensive at full serve. That's because the gas stations costs are higher to offer the service. Would you go to the self serve island and honk the horn until someone came out, pumped your gas, and then expected to pay self-serve rates? No, I don't think you would. And we're talking about $3.00 a tank here. A buyer agent is paid thousands in gross commissions, so they can get off the couch and show you the house.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Mar 21, 2010
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