Home Buying in Seattle>Question Details

Wendy Cecche…, Real Estate Pro in Seattle, WA

What has been your experience with buying or selling a Seattle property near powerlines? Does this affect the price? the ability to rent?

Asked by Wendy Ceccherelli, Seattle, WA Tue Jan 7, 2014

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19
There can also be a challenge with financing if the towers lie in the "fall zone" of the towner. Checking with your local lending institution.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu May 29, 2014
Yes, power lines effect the price and your ability to rent and sell. There are conflicting reports about the potential health hazards of living too close to power lines. There are a thousands of homes on the market that aren't near power lines. Buy one of those instead.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu May 29, 2014
Yes, power lines effect the price and your ability to rent and sell. There are conflicting reports about the potential health hazards of living too close to power lines. There are a thousands of homes on the market that aren't near power lines. Buy one of those instead.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu May 29, 2014
I'm no real estate agent, but I wouldn't have a problem buying a house near a powerline. I don't think they pose any health concerns, and if I liked the property and the house I wouldn't hesitate. I'd ask experienced agents in the area, however, about trends they've seen. They'll be able to let you know what the public's general feeling is.

Grace Watson | http://www.eaglehire.com/poles.html
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu May 29, 2014
My thoughts....

I would not consider a property that was any where near a power line there are all sorts of potential Health Issues plus it makes the home difficult to sell.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Jan 23, 2014
Since some people do not want to live near a power line, and probably no people consider that a must have feature, then yes, power lines do reduce demand and thereby reduce value. So that should mean that when you buy you can get the property at a lower price, but when you sell you will also get a lower price.

For buyers the question is how much will the power lines bother them. If not at all then the house near lines would save them money. If a lot, the house probably should not be bought at any price.

There will be the same impact on renters. Some renters will not want to live near power lines, so that will make it somewhat harder to rent and/or you may have to adjust your price.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Jan 9, 2014
Powerlines will narrow your buyer pool and therefore likely drive down the price. Seattle as a whole is a highly educated city and many people have heard possible negative consequences of EMF's.

Given our tight rental market currently and the idea that renters won't be living decades there, you are less likely to see much of a negative reaction to them from tenants. People are more likely to rent a house they might be skeptical of purchasing.

With all that being said all it takes is the one buyer who loves the open spaces and extra light!
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Jan 8, 2014
I sell homes in the South Seattle/Renton neighborhood with a major power line running through
the homes. Only homes directly under the lines are truly affected. You only have to be three or four homes away are unaffected. But the ones that are probable have a 10% DISCOUNT.

MIKE K
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 7, 2014
I have sold several homes next to powerlines. In fact, I will have one for sale soon. There are reports now that say there are no health issues but some people are still not comfortable with that. But for others, they don't seem to mind. They get the property for less money and many times, the location and size of the property is desirable. Many times you don't have a neighbor right next to you or behind you. So they like the privacy. Powerlines are like being next to the freeway, or a busy main arterial. In most cases the price is right.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 7, 2014
Discuss this question with your Broker, you Broker will be able to give you some great advise.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 7, 2014
Yes, heavy powerlines can discourage some buyers which ultimately affects price, but rarely affects rentability unless the powerlines are particularly close. I have had more than one buyer concerned about even the small transformers at the top of poles on most streets. The perception of risk and the actual increase of risk to health based on science are very different things, but the effect on value is real. Bonneville lines rarely go over private property (or near enough to ever likely affect health) and often have publicly accessible easements which add privacy and open space for those smart enough to recognize it.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 7, 2014
In my opinion proximity to major transmission lines will drive prices down.....
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 7, 2014
This will absolutely affect the value of a home.

And there are studies showing health risks (cancer in particular) as well.

I would very much caution you about buying a property if its in close proximity.

Sincerely,
Robin Denburg
2067624622
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 7, 2014
This will absolutely affect the value of a home.

And there are studies showing health risks (cancer in particular) as well.

I would very much caution you about buying a property if its in close proximity.

Sincerely,
Robin Denburg
2067624622
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 7, 2014
Wendy,
I stay completely away from any discussion of the scientific or medical issues. I'm not a scientist and suspect that for every finding that says it's "safe" I can find one saying "unsafe". What I am an expert on is real estate sales. Buying a home adjacent to power lines should only be considered if the home meets all buyer's other needs and is a "deal" when compared to similar homes away from power lines.
I advise my buyer's to do their own research and be persuaded in whichever way they feel comfortable in regard to safety, but to remember that though they are buyer's today, they will be seller's someday. The market for these homes will be smaller due to the uncertainty of the safety issues and future buyer's will need to be similarly enticed to buy. It will also likely take longer to sell than the same house away from them.
With all this stated, I'm comfortable moving forward however my clients choose.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 7, 2014
Look closely at this picture in the link... and then ask Michael Jordan. ;-)
http://money.cnn.com/2014/01/03/real_estate/jordans-house/in…
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 7, 2014
Yes, my belief is that it is a detriment to many due to aesthetic or electromagnetic radiation concerns. But every case is different, and it would depend upon how near the property was to the power lines. I would be happy to have a look and give you an opinion. kengraff@cbbain.com.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 7, 2014
My clients purchased a home near high-voltage power lines because of the adjacent open space.

They hired an independent electrical inspector who was familiar with high voltage power lines. He found that there was a negligible increase in electrical energy below the electrical towers.

However, he found the highest readings in two locations: 1) directly alongside/beneath the city power pole, which had a transformer, and 2) in the kitchen. It turns out that all kitchens will generate a high reading for electrical fields. That's because of all the electrical appliances. The expert suggested that ALL kitchens can be expected to put out the highest electrical field of any room in the house.

I'd recommend having your clients hire an independent electrical inspector if they are considering a home in close proximity to high voltage power lines. In my example, the inspection helped convince my clients to proceed with the sale.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 7, 2014
I've worked with buyers who can feel the movement of ions in the air when we get anywhere near hign voltage lines.
That would indicate to me that it does narrow the buyer pool.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jan 7, 2014
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