Home Buying in 94087>Question Details

Dhiraj, Home Buyer in Sunnyvale, CA

What does court lot mean?

Asked by Dhiraj, Sunnyvale, CA Tue Oct 26, 2010

In real estate terms, what does a court lot mean?

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It's possible the listing agent is referring to a residential parcel lot located on a court (street) where these lots are usually larger than others in the neighborhood and are located within the "curve" of the courted street those lots often have large pie piece shape to them. Have you input the address here on Trulia to see an aerial view ?
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 26, 2010
Dhiraj:

Thanks for your post.

As Andrea and David both noted, the "court lot" actually refers to the larger pie-shaped located at the end of cul-de-sac street, where there is not through traffic, so the extra space that would be allocated to the 32 foot wide street is distributed amongst the lots at the end of the street. This results in larger lots with a slight pie-shape and are considered premium lots due to size and location.

If you have any other questions about this lot and what it means to you, as a buyer, talk with your trusted Real Estate professional. They should also be able to respond to your questions!

Sincerely,
Grace Morioka, SRES, Reator, HOA Professional
Area Pro Realty
1.5% Commission and Rebates to Buyers
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 26, 2010
Hello Dhiraj;

Born, raised, live and work in Sunnyvale I'm glad to see you are also living in this great town. A court lot means a street lot that has a dead end to it. You drive down a court and it has a circular area at the end of the street to turn around on. It is not a through street, you must go in and turn around to come out. The homes that are on a Court lot go around this circle that you turn around in. Because they go around in a circle around the street they are always bigger lots than a normal street because of the shape of the court. They are not normal lots that are square in shape they normally look like a big piece of pie. These lots have more value in them for two reasons, one they are larger lots and two they are in a dead end street and you don't have through traffic or a busy street. They are quiet in natural because of no traffic. I love court lots and suggest you buy one. If I can help you in any way, with out any obligation please feel free to contact me since I know this town like the back of my hand. Now go make this a great day!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 26, 2010
Hi Dhiraj, The Court Lot usually means the larger end lot. There are cases where the home is just simply 'in a court' or Cul De Sac and those homes only benefit from the reduced traffic. This is a great feature for families with children who enjoy playing outside.

In the heel of a court lot, where the court ends, the frontage of the property is usually substantially reduced due to the Pie shape. However, this does allow for a larger rear yard depending on the placement of the home.

In some cases the larger back yard can be rendered useless if the home is placed too deep in the lot leaving you only large side yards. This does not lend itself to very much usable space for entertaining.

Something else to consider is the serious street parking issues that can occur in a court lot home (cul de sac located home) if the frontage area is reduced. Ordinary homes have enough space for 1 to 2 cars to park on the street directly in front of the home.

If a neighbor parks a large recreational vehicle or trailer the parking issue can become more serious.

When a home is located at the end of the Court all cars point directly at it as well. At night, the headlights can be annoying for some.

As you can see there are so many things to consider when you are choosing a home. Be sure your Realtor spends the time to share all of the different things to consider from roof to foundation to neighborhood to help you make the best choice.

Michael
http://LosGatosHomesandRealEstateBlog.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 26, 2010
Wikipedia:

"Dead End Street" redirects here. For the song by The Kinks, see Dead End Street (song).
.....

A cul-de-sac (literally "bottom of bag") is a word of French origin referring to a dead end, close, no through road (UK, Australian and Canadian English) or court (American English and Australian English) meaning dead-end street with only one inlet/outlet. While historically built for other reasons, its modern use is to calm vehicle traffic.

In the United States, a cul-de-sac is notably longer than a court.[c
Web Reference: http://www.TerriVellios.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 26, 2010
MLS has a description called Court Lot. It usually refers to homes in planned developments where the streets are on prive courts rather than a public street. If you go to a new development you will see that the streets are on courts that are maintained by the HOA not the city in most cases. These are court lots.

Hope that helps!
Marcy Moyer
DRE 01191194
Web Reference: http://www.marcymoyer.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 26, 2010
djiraji, write down where you read this and add the sentace that you read so we can help you.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 26, 2010
Hi Dhiraj,

Are you looking at some property with this description? Please provide more detail. I do see some properties listed as court lot in the east coast..
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 26, 2010
There is a listing that says Court lot. Also for location it mentions Court location. So not sure what the agent is referring to in the listing..?
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 26, 2010
Honestly, I've never heard the term. Can you provide some context?
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Oct 26, 2010
I been trying to find out wy my ancester had courtlot added to his name. He also was a tenancier (French). Acadians were given land in 1809 and he was in charge of making sure the granter had work the land enough to deserve a deed. Mabey that it.
Onil C. in N.B
Flag Tue Dec 31, 2013
Don Tepper, Real Estate Pro in Fairfax, VA
MVP'08
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